Other Upgrades when adding lift

cOtter

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x3 on the rabbit hole.

It's like buying a lathe or a mill - the initial purchase of the actual machine is cheap compared to all the tooling you're gonna want.

I'd really consider a comprehensive kit for lifting the JL - ultimately it'll save you lots of time and maybe some money. Worst case you'll probably break even on expense - buy once, cry once as they say

That said I'm all for having fun on a budget so if you can only afford $X now and you can't wait, ok. You can always add and upgrade stuff later just know in the long run you're definitely not saving time and probably not saving money.
Truly a rabbit hole..... the varmints are multiplying!!!!! :)
 

AnnDee4444

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This might not help the OP's rabbit hole issue, but I think other people may find it useful.

The roll center is determined by the center point of the panhard bar (a.k.a. track bar in Jeep lingo). Assuming a relocation bracket raises the axle-side mounting point 4", the resulting change to the roll center would be raised 2". Roll-center can be thought of as the point which the body rotates around. It is the center of rotation, and is mechanically linked to the axle through the panhard bar.

The other important concept to know is that the center of gravity is located somewhere above the roll-center. It's exact location is not important, as long as you are familiar with the idea that lowering the center of gravity reduces body-roll (think sports car). The center of gravity acts as mass with a virtual lever arm that pivots around the roll-center, which is what forces the body to roll. By reducing this lever-arm length, the body mass has less mechanical leverage. The lever-arm length can be reduced by two ways: lowering the center of gravity or raising the roll-center height. Lowering the center of gravity is usually not possible in a Jeep, but raising the roll-center height can be achieved with the axle bracket.

By raising the roll center high enough, you could theoretically get zero or reverse body roll (leaning into the corners). This is probably not possible in a Jeep, but I mention it to show the potential influence of the suspension geometry changes. Another benefit of a higher roll center is that less sway-bar will be required for the same amount of body-roll. In some cases this could allow removal of the sway-bar for better articulation. These calculations that I have described above relate to both the front and rear axles, and each axle has their own independent values.

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