Is overheating an issue?

JDub11

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EGR actually reduces in cylinder combustion temp.





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Rogues Gambit

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What’s involved with replacing these tubes?
Removing front bumper, detaching a few things including the Intercooler and then replacing the original connecting pipes with those, thus gaining better airflow and stuff

Never actually diy, so might have a step or two out of place
 

Narb16

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So today I was driving at an incline on my 3.0 that I got about 6 months ago and it got to 75% to the hot temp gauge. The weather was about 110 but my buddy was driving his range and his gauge temp was consistent the whole incline. I also had a 3.6 JLR and it did the same going up an incline with similar weather as well. So I’m curious if they can’t withstand it? Or drain and add more concentrated coolant?
 

Sydwaiz

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I drove from L.A. to Vegas two weeks ago. It was 115 in Baker when I went through. Going up Baker grade, it definitely started to get hot beyond my liking. Then again, I was going about 85mph or so pushing it up a hill. I don't recall the actual temps(around 240 or so) but I slowed down a bit and got out of the boost and temps dropped immediately. I had the gauge screen active on the Uconnect so I could watch all the temps.

My next upgrade is going to be something where I can monitor the boost and EGT. The turbo on these motors are water cooled and this is why I think we are seeing the higher and faster temp swings. I have the Tazer but it only monitors boost.
I have boost and EGT gauges on my Duramax and when I'm towing or hauling something heavy, I pretty much drive by those two gauges alone. Keep your EGTs in check and it will save your turbo and motor.
 

DEZELJP

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Alright I’m going to give you the truth according to two new version eco diesels. Just returned from Moab doing a 10 day family road trip. Driving a 2020 JL Rubicon and a 2021 Rubicon Gladiator. Both Diesel of course. Your diesel does not like the heat, the altitude and the RPM. Your Eco Diesel will protect itself and shutdown if you are pushing these. Your oil temp will hit which appears to be as we tested about 248 degrees. It will shut down and not let you push over 2000rpm. This means you will not be able to even hold the 80mph speed limit. Ram diesel owners have already experienced this and have been trying a variety of mods so they can tow their trailers. This is a dash pic with the outside temp, oil temp. The Gladiator carrying more load experienced this issue before JL did. No, neither had a lot of weight. JL had a cooler a suitcase, three passengers, normal tools, winch, running 35” Mud Terrains.
We have not had time to research this any further because we are headed out of town again. (Sorry if I’m slow responding to forum ahead of time.) Gladiator has hood vents already ordered to see if this helps since it is on the road again. So there is the truth.

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Mjolimar

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I have a 2021 Wrangler Rubicon with an unmodified Ecodiesel. It does have a Tazer mini installed, but that does not affect engine performance in any way. It has LoD Destroyer front and rear bumpers and tire carrier, and is running on 35x12.5 BF Goodrich T/A tires on stock wheels. I have a R-Pod 171 Trailer that runs 2500 pounds empty that I tow from time to time.

The front bumper and Warn winch I have sit low and do not interfere with the radiator, which is why I bought that particular setup. I have no lights above the bumper – just the fog lights in the bumper itself.

Even when not towing, this diesel runs hotter than any diesel I have ever owned. Of course, I have only owned Cummins diesels before, and perhaps they run cold. So I get nervous watching the gauges on this Ecodiesel sometimes. The fact is that 240 degrees on any engine is friggin hot, and it hits that going up grades at speed in high ambient temperatures whether towing or not. The gauge goes up to about half slowly, but as soon as it hits halfway if I keep my foot in it, the rise is fast. Towing on long grades, I have to slow down to keep the heat down. So a 7% grade loaded and towing has me backing off the throttle and maybe doing 50 or less just to keep the temperatures down. No problem with power, as it would easily pull hard and fast up just about any grade I encounter on highways or the interstate, but heat is an issue.

Last week, I pulled off the hood liner and opened the hood vents with a Dremel tool, to make them operational instead of cosmetic in hopes of getting some more air moving through the radiator because that is clearly the limiting factor. The only other thing I can see that would be an easy mod would be to move the horns, since they block the air flow to upper corners of the radiator. The grill inserts do block maybe 3/4” of the total width of each of the grill openings, and maybe the edges of the JT grill inserts are a little thinner? I haven’t checked that.

All in all, this engine appears to run hot on purpose. I wonder what the thermostat is set at. It is definitely higher than 190, because the engine warms up past 210 immediately in any weather. That is perhaps why they are so picky about the oil, as those temperatures will cook any soot that is in the oil. Perhaps that is why the point of failure on these engines appears to be the main bearings filling with hard deposits. There are a couple YouTube videos showing this.

My plan is to see if the opening of the vents helps, maybe move the horns, take it easy on the hills (especially when towing), and try to keep the temperatures under 240. I hate to cook oil like this. So far, I am changing the oil at 5000 miles, and Blackstone Labs is saying my oil is fine, so I will keep changing it at 5000 miles.

The biggest thing I would think might help would be an aftermarket radiator with an additional row of coolant passages (another row in depth, that is), and perhaps a thermostat that is ten degrees cooler. I love the engine and the Jeep itself, but I hate to cook any engine like this.

EDIT — Just to make sure I am being clear, the engine temperatures I am talking about are oil and water temperatures as shown on the off-road gauges and the main gauges in the cluster. It is the oil temperature that I am most worries about, as it tends to run hotter than the water temperature. I am talking about changing the thermostat in hopes that a cooler engine may help keep the oil from spiking in temperature. I haven’t looked at the oil cooler to see if it is part of the radiator (like the transmission cooler often is). If the oil cooler is separate, like it should be, then a larger oil cooler or a better placement would definitely help.
 

Compression-Ignition

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These engines do indeed run hot. For guys that have had diesels before and who also pay attention to temps, it just doesn't seem right. Count me in that group.

I am convinced as others have stated that the entire system runs hot as designed. They want it this way for emissions purposes. The hotter it runs the easier it is to burn everything off.

My advice is to quit worrying about it and let it do what it does. Drive it with a smile and take it in if any issues arise. Either that, or just 'fix' the damn thing and make it right....
 

Plongson

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The little diesel DOES run hot...too hot for my liking, but it is what it is I guess.

The TAZER with the latest version allow you to manually run the electric radiator fan on HIGH rolling down the road. I find if I start the fan before actually encountering a high temp condition (ie. steep grade etc.) it does help keep the temp down on the off road gauge.

With all this said...For instance, I've scanned the entire engine with IR at many different temps and nowhere have I found anything as hot as what the digital gauge is reading..(except the exhaust amnifold...DUH...lol). I sure wish I knew where they were the sender is and how they are getting the readings.
 

rickinAZ

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I don't tow or go up steep hills, but I do drive in one of the hottest places on the planet. So far, no troubling temperatures. Does it only happen under a load?
 

Plongson

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Well, it looks like what is considered "high" engine temperature is purely in the eye of the beholder.

If one is old enough to be from the era of 180f thermostat, these little engines are scorchers.

Others think it's fine if spit sizzles on the air cleaner.
 

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