LED Headlight Fail - Winter Driving

cgagnon99

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For the reasons stated you would think someone would design /make a lens that attaches to the outer ring to sit flush with grill, so it would be flat and the force of air would push the snow off ....heck add a heating element in that with a connector to the light! Like a light cover but clear so the benefit of light is still there unencumbered by the build up of snow.
I had this idea a while ago! I guess it could affect the optics of the headlight but should be relatively simple





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Cleoncini

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LEDs are not the problem... My JL is sitting on a 3.5" lift with 38s, I lowered my lights and have not been flashed a single time. So for those of you complaining about LEDs being too harsh, not sure what to tell you, manufacturers won't be stepping back in time. I had a JK with Halogens, and driving that thing at night was dangerous. They did not light up a damn thing. HIDs, LEDs are a very important feature that vehicles need to have. Not many new vehicles are leaving the lot with Halogens anymore.

The original post by OP has been addressed about the snow, it's the recessed housing that is going to give us winter people issues.
 

Strommen95

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LEDs are not the problem... My JL is sitting on a 3.5" lift with 38s, I lowered my lights and have not been flashed a single time. So for those of you complaining about LEDs being too harsh, not sure what to tell you, manufacturers won't be stepping back in time. I had a JK with Halogens, and driving that thing at night was dangerous. They did not light up a damn thing. HIDs, LEDs are a very important feature that vehicles need to have. Not many new vehicles are leaving the lot with Halogens anymore.

If one genuinely feels unsafe without LED lights than the issue is with ones self and not Halogens. The point of headlights is to see in front of the vehicle and a small radius outside it. Not everything and anything around you blinding oncoming traffic in the process. In most areas of the country they are not safer and even in poor lit areas high beams are there for a reason.

The automotive industry is incredibly regulated. The more LED lights on the road the more likely it’ll be regulated. Especially with this incoming administration.
 

Cleoncini

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If one genuinely feels unsafe without LED lights than the issue is with ones self and not Halogens. The point of headlights is to see in front of the vehicle and a small radius outside it. Not everything and anything around you blinding oncoming traffic in the process. In most areas of the country they are not safer and even in poor lit areas high beams are there for a reason.

The automotive industry is incredibly regulated. The more LED lights on the road the more likely it’ll be regulated. Especially with this incoming administration.
Have you driven in a new vehicle with LEDs/HIDs or is your only experience with lighting technology from 1983? You're incidentally making my point... headlights are made to see in front of a vehicle and a radius outside of it. LEDs do this INCREDIBLY well. You're complaining more about the person that goes down to Autozone, or orders some no name Chinese light off Amazon and throws it into their stock halogen housing. That just casts light every which way. Auto Manufacturers are not just putting this into vehicles so light can be cast out like a flood light.

The last thing we need is the government regulating anything more.... they can't do much right to begin with, so more auto regulation isn't exactly a comforting feeling.
 

Strommen95

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Have you driven in a new vehicle with LEDs/HIDs or is your only experience with lighting technology from 1983? You're incidentally making my point... headlights are made to see in front of a vehicle and a radius outside of it. LEDs do this INCREDIBLY well. You're complaining more about the person that goes down to Autozone, or orders some no name Chinese light off Amazon and throws it into their stock halogen housing. That just casts light every which way. Auto Manufacturers are not just putting this into vehicles so light can be cast out like a flood light.

The last thing we need is the government regulating anything more.... they can't do much right to begin with, so more auto regulation isn't exactly a comforting feeling.
Of course. They obviously light up the road better at the expense of blinding oncoming traffic. A great positive associated with a great negative. The Halogens in comparison do the job fine, are cheap and don't blind others. LEDs while nice(especially visually on a vehicle) just aren't necessary. It wouldn't be a big deal if they weren't all over the place but they are. You are right about cheap Chinese lights but daily driving through the Northeast I've been in front of enough JLs with stock LEDs to know they're too bright.

Agreed. That's exactly why slapping LEDs because one can rather than because it's necessary is a bad idea.
 

KDX

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I do a fair amount of night driving and would not consider a vehicle without LED lights from the factory.
 

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Add to that a growing number of drivers who are either too inconsiderate or lazy to lower their beams around town.
In the past few years, that problem has increased to epidemic levels. Offending drivers are simply refusing to manually dip their main beams (to use European terminology here) when flashed to do so by an oncoming vehicle. Projector and particularly LED lighting on High can be truly blinding; that's a point I will concede to the cheerleaders who prattle on regarding the alleged inferiority of incandescent lighting.

I'd wager part of the problem stems from automated lighting systems that are supposed to switch to low beams, based on the sensitivity of the sensor on the windshield. These systems are increasingly common, and no doubt are contributing to the laziness that you correctly suggest is occurring.
 

aldo98229

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In the past few years, that problem has increased to epidemic levels. Offending drivers are simply refusing to manually dip their main beams (to use European terminology here) when flashed to do so by an oncoming vehicle. Projector and particularly LED lighting on High can be truly blinding; that's a point I will concede to the cheerleaders who prattle on regarding the alleged inferiority of incandescent lighting.

I'd wager part of the problem stems from automated lighting systems that are supposed to switch to low beams, based on the sensitivity of the sensor on the windshield. These systems are increasingly common, and no doubt are contributing to the laziness that you correctly suggest is occurring.
Or perhaps is laziness from a new generation of users of mobile devices and apps that has become accustomed to not having to do anything manually.
 

Oncorhynchus

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LEDs are not the problem... My JL is sitting on a 3.5" lift with 38s, I lowered my lights and have not been flashed a single time. So for those of you complaining about LEDs being too harsh, not sure what to tell you, manufacturers won't be stepping back in time. I had a JK with Halogens, and driving that thing at night was dangerous. They did not light up a damn thing. HIDs, LEDs are a very important feature that vehicles need to have. Not many new vehicles are leaving the lot with Halogens anymore.

The original post by OP has been addressed about the snow, it's the recessed housing that is going to give us winter people issues.
My Sahara is riding on a 2” lift with 35” tires and all the Audi / BMW / Benz vehicles around these parts are not blinding me with cheap aftermarket LED headlights. The brightness of oncoming traffic’s low beam LEDs make it really hard for me to see pedestrians at night while I am turning at an intersection.

The LED headlights visible in the sides mirror make it more difficult for me to see the road ahead of me on the freeway because the light reflected off the mirror is always going to dominate the dynamic range of my eyes compared to the light reflecting off the road ahead of the LED-equipped vehicle just behind me in either lane.

What’s the use of bright lights illuminating the road when those same lights are causing my pupils to contract because they are lighting up my side mirrors on the freeway and shining directly in my eyes on local roads

You are right about manufacturers continuing to use LED lights. The presence of LED headlights will continue to grow. I may have to look for some sunglasses that are able to selectively filter the LED light more than the yellowish light of my conventional headlights when dealing with oncoming traffic and possibly find a way to get something like autodimming capabilities for the side mirrors for highway driving.

I might get some auxiliary LED lights for my Jeep. After all, I bought the vehicle to transport me to places far from civilization.
 

Heimkehr

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Or perhaps is laziness from a new generation of users of mobile devices and apps that has become accustomed to not having to do anything manually.
That's an easy conclusion, and I don't entirely disagree with it.

That said, I've observed drivers of all ages with poor lane discipline. I see it every day...the constant fiddling with touchscreen infotainment systems, which have an ever-increasing presence in all automotive trim levels. These distractions have largely replaced the distraction of smart phones, which are now controlled by voice and steering wheel controls through those same touchscreens.

In response to arguably misplaced consumer demand, manufacturers are forced to compete with each other as it concerns adding new forms of needless complexity to their vehicles. It's instructive to consider that even the mainline automotive journals & websites are framing their analysis in the same way, despite being completely at the mercy of the OEMs for free/sponsored access to the latest and greatest vehicles.
 

aldo98229

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That's an easy conclusion, and I don't entirely disagree with it.

That said, I've observed drivers of all ages with poor lane discipline. I see it every day...the constant fiddling with touchscreen infotainment systems, which have an ever-increasing presence in all automotive trim levels. These distractions have largely replaced the distraction of smart phones, which are now controlled by voice and steering wheel controls through those same touchscreens.

In response to arguably misplaced consumer demand, manufacturers are forced to compete with each other as it concerns adding new forms of needless complexity to their vehicles. It's instructive to consider that even the mainline automotive journals & websites are framing their analysis in the same way, despite being completely at the mercy of the OEMs for free/sponsored access to the latest and greatest vehicles.
Awhile ago, I was sitting at Discount Tire waiting for my wheels to be balanced and rotated when a mint early 1980s Buick Century, like this one, pulled up right in front.

It struck me how unobstructed outward visibility was. You could see right inside and right through it. Window pillars were thinner, seat backs and belt lines were lower, to the point that your eye sight was directed towards outside.

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Not only we are much more cocooned in modern vehicles, but most trucks and SUVs now have dark windows, and there are so many more distractions pulling our attention inside, like digital screens, LED lights, illuminated switches, fancy stitching, etc.

In general, a car was a tool that enabled you to go and see the world, albeit with an individual degree of flavor. Today, we create our own separate world inside; vehicles are the object of existence onto themselves.

Like the difference between the journey and the destination.
 

Moreace

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Would be nice if there was a clip in dome or something quick and easy (doesn't have to be pretty, just functional), that could be thrown in those few time you're driving in snow and it would be an issue.

This combined with the front defroster issues make this go anywhere all terrain vehicle a pain in snowy conditions. You would think these design issues would be addressed by now.
 

BroncoHound

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Was up in Denver yesterday and headed back home in the evening during the snow storm. Had white out conditions most of the way out of Denver heading south to the Springs.

Visibility was pretty crappy but made even worse by the headlights getting frozen over. Couldn’t stop to clean them either as there weren’t many safe places to stop. This is ridiculous.

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If it makes you feel any better, I was driving through your stretch of I-25 last Monday and the 55w HID retrofit headlights on my pickup which NEVER ice over were completely caked by the time I hit the Wyoming line. That whiteout that hit late Monday afternoon between Colorado Springs and Denver was severe. 65degF at 10:30am, 18degF and accumulating 45 minutes later.
 

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