Traction Control - On vs Off when off-roading

jeepoch

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Chris,

Not to belabor anything further but something's been knawing on me.

Why would you have been embarrased to use 4WD to move your rig in snow? That's exactly why 4WD was invented.

Needing to prove that you can jump tall buildings in a single bound while only in 2WD seems strange. At a hunting camp, my rig would have naturally already been in 4WD (likely 4Lo) already just getting there. Getting it started and moving should have been peanuts.

It seems like you rely way to much on your experience with the LSD and only select 4WD for the most tumultuous of circumstances.

For me, if I'm not on pavement or some maintained and grated dirt road, 4WD is my best friend. It's why I purchased the JL in the first place. For me nearly anything off-road (off pavement) = 4WD almost instinctively.

My AWD nature just doesn't require a computer and a fancy transfer case. I'll never be embarrased by driving my JL the way it was designed or intended.

If my father or brother in law chided me for it, I'd tell them to pound sand while snorkeling. It's nearly the same thing.

I like my Jeep. I like everything about it. Especially what makes it way better than any ordinary two wheel drive car.

Best wishes, happy Jeeping.
Jay





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RV Wrench

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Lots of really good info in here.

I'll give a more thorough/brief summary of my findings:

-Traction control: if this is on, all three features are enabled (TC, SC, BLD). I am telling you right now that if you try to climb a hill with limited traction (especially a sand dune), you probably wont make it. I find TC is only useful on the street.

4lo:

-Stability control: if TC is off but SC is on, you also still have BLD. Even with SC ON and TC OFF, your ability to climb hills with limited traction can be noticeably decreased. IE: you find you need more throttle/momentum, but the Jeep isn't accelerating any more even with the pedal on the floor. There are several times I have tested with and without this feature, and I can tell you that the computer running things did NOT allow you to take full advantage of traction available. The computer response is way too delayed in sensing actual traction.

-Brake Lock Differential: Even if TC and SC are turned OFF, you still have BLD. This will apply brakes to the spinning wheels in limited traction situations to apply more wheel torque to the wheels not spinning. For super slow mostly-good traction situations (creepy crawly crossed-up situations), it can help your Jeep get through stuff that other guys have to lock their diffs to make it through. In slightly higher speed situations where wheelspin is actually more advantageous, this feature hurts your momentum. I find this is a problem mostly in sand and snow hillclimbs. I do not believe there is any factory way to shut it off (unless the lockers are engaged), but it is most definitely shut off with a Tazer, by holding the TC OFF button until the dash lights up with all kinds of warnings.

Hope this helps.
 

McGilli

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I made this video today for anyone interested
F ME

Thank you.

In the past 2 months I've experience this 2 times in a snowy road - both times in the mountain I had to turn around as it just bogged right down in the snow - just like what you had - and wouldn't move any further

This would have helped enormously both times - at least until I was past those situations.

Thanks for posting this.
 

Black Jeep Convertible

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As a city dweller with a sport, I turn TC off all the time when I need to parallel park on top of a lot of snow. Full Stop + Steering Locked + TC on isn't going to get you anywhere when you only need to move inches over and over again.
 

Mfarr75

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So sorry for the probably dumb question but is there any benefit to keeping TC off when doing normal road/highway driving, meaning would the engine be peppier on road with it off, or does it not really make much difference on dry roads.
 

MeanMrWolf

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So sorry for the probably dumb question but is there any benefit to keeping TC off when doing normal road/highway driving, meaning would the engine be peppier on road with it off, or does it not really make much difference on dry roads.
Absolutely no benefit. If you're driving on the highway it's not going to engage unless you're already, pardon the expression, fucked. That's usually because you're driving past the limits of the conditions already.
 
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basinite

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F ME

Thank you.

In the past 2 months I've experience this 2 times in a snowy road - both times in the mountain I had to turn around as it just bogged right down in the snow - just like what you had - and wouldn't move any further

This would have helped enormously both times - at least until I was past those situations.

Thanks for posting this.
Your welcome and anytime, glad it helped you out. :like:

I believe the Jeep community is the most tight knit vehicle community out there. These forums and the folks who post on them certainly exemplify that belief.
 

DadJokes

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Your traction control algorithm doesn’t know what you’re TRYING to do. It just reacts. If you’re trying to push through deep snow and you want the treads to clear with rpm, turn off traction control. That’s why they enable you to disable it.
 

Uhdinator

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Chris,

Not to belabor anything further but something's been knawing on me.

Why would you have been embarrased to use 4WD to move your rig in snow? That's exactly why 4WD was invented.

Needing to prove that you can jump tall buildings in a single bound while only in 2WD seems strange. At a hunting camp, my rig would have naturally already been in 4WD (likely 4Lo) already just getting there. Getting it started and moving should have been peanuts.

It seems like you rely way to much on your experience with the LSD and only select 4WD for the most tumultuous of circumstances.
I use 2WD as much as I can:
Helps you become good at judging terrain / capabilities with and without 4WD.
Saves wear on components (turning sharp in 4WD is hard on axle u joints)

Just because I turn onto a dirt road doesn't mean I need 4WD. Obviously if I come to a mud hole or very rough terrain or a steep grade (were I know from experience that I'm going to need more traction or a crawl speed) I engage 4WD before attempting. When I'm back to a smooth terrain I go back to 2WD. No need to add extra wear and tear when I don't need 4WD.

I remember the first year of the TJ Rubicon.........There were a lot of people damaging Front axle U joints and complaints about problems and a lot of it was because many were going out and hitting the trail..........as soon as they got on a dirt trail, Lock everything up. There were instances of blowing out front u joints and breaking ball joints galore.

Example: Don't need 4WD for something like this.........its like driving on pavement. (look at the tiny fender wells that are barely big enough for 31 x 10.50's with recurved leaf springs even)

IMG_5963 2.jpg


IMG_5962 2.jpg


Tumbledown4.JPG
 
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basinite

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Chris,

Not to belabor anything further but something's been knawing on me.

Why would you have been embarrased to use 4WD to move your rig in snow? That's exactly why 4WD was invented.

Needing to prove that you can jump tall buildings in a single bound while only in 2WD seems strange. At a hunting camp, my rig would have naturally already been in 4WD (likely 4Lo) already just getting there. Getting it started and moving should have been peanuts.

It seems like you rely way to much on your experience with the LSD and only select 4WD for the most tumultuous of circumstances.

For me, if I'm not on pavement or some maintained and grated dirt road, 4WD is my best friend. It's why I purchased the JL in the first place. For me nearly anything off-road (off pavement) = 4WD almost instinctively.

My AWD nature just doesn't require a computer and a fancy transfer case. I'll never be embarrased by driving my JL the way it was designed or intended.

If my father or brother in law chided me for it, I'd tell them to pound sand while snorkeling. It's nearly the same thing.

I like my Jeep. I like everything about it. Especially what makes it way better than any ordinary two wheel drive car.

Best wishes, happy Jeeping.
Jay

I think your taking the story way to seriously, at least the part about being "embarrassed". We talk sh*t to each other all day long, isn't that what family does??? Yes, if you get stuck in a few inches of snow and have to shift to 4 wheel, prepare for some massive sh*t talking and questioning of your skills. LOL.

Uhdinator in the post above this one pretty much hit the nail on the head.
 

rallydefault

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-Traction control: if this is on, all three features are enabled (TC, SC, BLD). I am telling you right now that if you try to climb a hill with limited traction (especially a sand dune),
See, I've gone oversanding many times now, and I never once turned off my traction control and I've been just fine. I always air down to 15psi, and I only do 4hi, and haven't had any issues. Packed sand near the water, super soft sand dunes up and down away from the water; everything's been fine with the TC on. Maybe it's the aggressive airing down that can offset?

Otherwise, excellent video, OP!
 

jeepoch

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I think your taking the story way to seriously, at least the part about being "embarrassed". We talk sh*t to each other all day long, isn't that what family does??? Yes, if you get stuck in a few inches of snow and have to shift to 4 wheel, prepare for some massive sh*t talking and questioning of your skills. LOL.

Uhdinator in the post above this one pretty much hit the nail on the head.
Chris,

Fair enough. Like I said, this was 'knawing' on me. My dad has since passed and I no longer have the pleasure of him giving me his ration of friendly criticisms. However, when he crossed the line I would give it back. Never in an unfriendly way, but just to give him a taste of his own medicine. Boy I really do miss that.

Yes, maybe I've read way too much into this. For me, I do tend to favor 4Hi over 2Hi on nearly anything off-road and 4Lo is reserved for the slow speed, really tough stuff. However, I agree with @Uhdinator that everything he posted is still 'on-road' in my book. Living along the Colorado Front Range and going off-road is typically unmaintained Forest Trails where twisty, winding mountain paths dictates a top speed of only around 3-10mph (max).

Here, trails tend to get fairly radical pretty quickly.

Jay

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basinite

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Chris,

Fair enough. Like I said, this was 'knawing' on me. My dad has since passed and I no longer have the pleasure of him giving me his ration of friendly criticisms. However, when he crossed the line I would give it back. Never in an unfriendly way, but just to give him a taste of his own medicine. Boy I really do miss that.

Yes, maybe I've read way too much into this. For me, I do tend to favor 4Hi over 2Hi on nearly anything off-road and 4Lo is reserved for the slow speed, really tough stuff. However, I agree with @Uhdinator that everything he posted is still 'on-road' in my book. Living along the Colorado Front Range and going off-road is typically unmaintained Forest Trails where twisty, winding mountain paths dictates a top speed of only around 3-10mph (max).

Here, trails tend to get fairly radical pretty quickly.

Jay

IMG_20201010_141718_1.jpg


IMG_20200901_113102.jpg


IMG_20201010_130216_1.jpg


IMG_20201010_130110.jpg


IMG_20201010_124648.jpg


InShot_20200915_223133135.jpg


IMG_20201017_101409.jpg


IMG_20201010_114334.jpg


IMG_7689.jpg


IMG_20201017_102200.jpg


IMG_20201010_120123.jpg


IMG_20200614_152406.jpg

You, me and everyone else on here are "Jeep Family", so its all good.

I'm sorry to hear about your father. Mine is getting up there in age, so I try to hang out with him as much as possible these days.

Very nice pictures!!!
 

Timmyjoe

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I made this video today for anyone interested (first video, so don't laugh).

In 2012 when the 3.6 came out I bought one and first time getting stuck in the snow I blamed the "new" engine. I had no power, my posi rear end wasn't working, needless to say I was pissed. After getting un-stuck and a few hours of Google Research, I learned the hard way about turning this off when off-roading.

My Dad had a similar issue last month while playing in the snow and couldn't figure out why his new Dodge Truck was acting so gutless while out playing in the snow.

I decided to make this video for all folks new to Jeeping.

Enjoy.
Thanks so much for posting this. I was not aware of how to do this, and today, for the first time, I got my Jeep stuck. Well, not really stuck, was in deep snow, and 2WD trying to back up, and on a side incline and as the back end slipped, it started sliding downhill toward a wall that was just a couple feet away. So I turned off traction control and tried again, and it was better but still inching toward the wall, so I popped it into 4WD High and did the "Hold traction control button for five seconds" and the dash indicated Traction Control was OFF and the Jeep walked right out, no longer sliding toward the wall. So Thanks Again, would not have known how to do this without your video.

Best,
-Tim
 
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