Negotiating for a side step.

viper88

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Dude. You’re going to lose this deal if you aren’t able to stop analyzing every single possible contingency. Your price is practically unbeatable! You’re not likely to get free side steps, instead you’re likely to stop having your calls returned.

That said, here’s the way to use that sort of technique. Once you have a deal you know you’ll say yes to, then find a reason to throw in an accessory to get you to say yes to the purchase of the Jeep.

When I bought mine I said “Okay. Throw in a set of all-weather Floor Mats and I’ll come to your store first tomorrow.” (I was traveling almost 3 hours and two dealerships in the same area were offering me the same discount.) If the sales manager had said no, I’d still have bought their Jeep in all likelihood, but they said yes and I didn’t go to the other dealership at all.

So in a case like that, knowing 7.5% under invoice on a Sport was pretty much all there was, at least I got the “free” mats which I knew I was going to have to buy anyway.
What was your build and msrp? How much under msrp was your 7.7% under invoice? Was it a cash deal without financing and trade?





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Jeepney18

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Dude. You’re going to lose this deal if you aren’t able to stop analyzing every single possible contingency. Your price is practically unbeatable! You’re not likely to get free side steps, instead you’re likely to stop having your calls returned.

That said, here’s the way to use that sort of technique. Once you have a deal you know you’ll say yes to, then find a reason to throw in an accessory to get you to say yes to the purchase of the Jeep.

When I bought mine I said “Okay. Throw in a set of all-weather Floor Mats and I’ll come to your store first tomorrow.” (I was traveling almost 3 hours and two dealerships in the same area were offering me the same discount.) If the sales manager had said no, I’d still have bought their Jeep in all likelihood, but they said yes and I didn’t go to the other dealership at all.

So in a case like that, knowing 7.5% under invoice on a Sport was pretty much all there was, at least I got the “free” mats which I knew I was going to have to buy anyway.
I get it. I'm asking for too much. That's why I post here to get feedback. The thing is, I didn't even negotiate yet.
 
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Jeepney18

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What was your build and msrp? How much under msrp was your 7.7% under invoice? Was it a cash deal without financing and trade?
Basically msrp is 40710. OTD they agreed to when I showed them a quote from another dealership was 34777 and they told me if they can do that, can I come in tonight and get it. So since I didn't even negotiate anything yet, I thought I would try to get more. I know the deal is already good according to what I've seen here in the forum.
 

Shots

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I'm also going to ask for the lifetime warranty since it's a first YEAR JL (does this even matter) and a full tank of gas. Is that too much to ask? Should I be asking for something else?
I'm normally skeptical about buying a first year vehicle, but the JL has so much in common with the JK, that I didn't worry about it. These are more like a redesign, or update, rather than a first year model car.
For example the Renegade came out in 2015, and was a completely new vehicle. The 15's have some problems that the following years don't have. However, the Ram was updated in 2009 (known as the 4th generation). They didn't have any significant issues because a lot of the same design was still there from the 3rd generation. It's more of a face lift and update than a "first year vehicle". The JL from the JK is the same thing.

As for the lifetime warranty. Meh, I'm not impressed. My dealership threw it in, without any negotiation at all. They do it on all the new cars/trucks they sell. The key to the lifetime warranty is that you must have all scheduled maintenance done by the dealership for them to honor it. Scheduled maintenance comes around a lot faster than actually required. The book still shows something like 3-4 thousand miles between oil changes, but with full synthetic oil that is usually a fair amount longer. Not only that, but even if you follow the book's recommended service schedule, you'll be paying quite a bit for that "free" warranty. For example, part of the scheduled maintenance is little things like air filters, and tire rotations. You can buy a Mopar filter (or a better aftermarket one) for the same money or less at somewhere like Summit Racing. You do the install yourself in 5 minutes for free. If you go through the dealership they charge an hourly rate to change the filter, plus you're usually paying more for the filter. The tire rotation should cost you nothing, but if you take it to the dealership so you maintain the scheduled maintenance to retain that lifetime warranty, they'll bill you an hourly rate to rotate the tires.
Long story short. In my opinion, it's not worth it. The factory warranty is 3yr/36k bumper to bumper, and 5yr/60k on the powertrain. This is generally sufficient, which is probably why it's the industry standard. It's worth asking for the lifetime warranty, but I wouldn't make it my key negotiation piece.
As for the tank of gas. Sure, ask for it, no harm in asking. As with the warranty, my dealership does this with every new car sale, without negotiating. After signing the papers and getting ready to walk out the door, I saw a different salesman wearing a Jeep hat. I looked at my salesman and asked him "can you hook me up with one of those hats?". He did. It never hurts to ask, the worst they'll do is say no. I don't think I'd make a tank of gas a negotiation item though. After all, it's maybe a $40 value if they're filling it from empty.

Free hat.jpg
 

Wanderingwheelz

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I'm normally skeptical about buying a first year vehicle, but the JL has so much in common with the JK, that I didn't worry about it. These are more like a redesign, or update, rather than a first year model car.
For example the Renegade came out in 2015, and was a completely new vehicle. The 15's have some problems that the following years don't have. However, the Ram was updated in 2009 (known as the 4th generation). They didn't have any significant issues because a lot of the same design was still there from the 3rd generation. It's more of a face lift and update than a "first year vehicle". The JL from the JK is the same thing.

As for the lifetime warranty. Meh, I'm not impressed. My dealership threw it in, without any negotiation at all. They do it on all the new cars/trucks they sell. The key to the lifetime warranty is that you must have all scheduled maintenance done by the dealership for them to honor it. Scheduled maintenance comes around a lot faster than actually required. The book still shows something like 3-4 thousand miles between oil changes, but with full synthetic oil that is usually a fair amount longer. Not only that, but even if you follow the book's recommended service schedule, you'll be paying quite a bit for that "free" warranty. For example, part of the scheduled maintenance is little things like air filters, and tire rotations. You can buy a Mopar filter (or a better aftermarket one) for the same money or less at somewhere like Summit Racing. You do the install yourself in 5 minutes for free. If you go through the dealership they charge an hourly rate to change the filter, plus you're usually paying more for the filter. The tire rotation should cost you nothing, but if you take it to the dealership so you maintain the scheduled maintenance to retain that lifetime warranty, they'll bill you an hourly rate to rotate the tires.
Long story short. In my opinion, it's not worth it. The factory warranty is 3yr/36k bumper to bumper, and 5yr/60k on the powertrain. This is generally sufficient, which is probably why it's the industry standard. It's worth asking for the lifetime warranty, but I wouldn't make it my key negotiation piece.
As for the tank of gas. Sure, ask for it, no harm in asking. As with the warranty, my dealership does this with every new car sale, without negotiating. After signing the papers and getting ready to walk out the door, I saw a different salesman wearing a Jeep hat. I looked at my salesman and asked him "can you hook me up with one of those hats?". He did. It never hurts to ask, the worst they'll do is say no. I don't think I'd make a tank of gas a negotiation item though. After all, it's maybe a $40 value if they're filling it from empty.

Free hat.jpg
This is an excellent post.

For a car dealership to be offering a free lifetime warranty you can be sure that they’ve structured it in such a way that they’re the long-term winner.

Car dealers are just like Wall Street bankers. Everything is structured to benefit themselves, not the customer.
 

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