Heel/Toe Solutions?

RussJeep1

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I guess everyone thinks the only reason someone would want to employ this technique to their daily driving is because race car...


Sorry that was long.
...but not excessive...well said Leo.:)
 

RussJeep1

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Hi all,

On most cars I've purchased, I have been able to buy a gas pedal that extends a little closer to the brake pedal to facilitate heel/toe shifting. The struggle I'm facing right now is two-fold - I haven't been able to find any sort of pedal that does that for the Jeep and the brake pedal is positioned much higher than the gas pedal. So two questions:

1. Has anyone heard of or found a gas pedal that extends closer to the break pedal? Here is a picture of what I'm taking about. The gas pedal installed is the one I'm using that has a little lip extending toward the brake pedal):
199046d1501310603-how-remove-gas-pedal-nismo-380rs-gas-pedal.jpg


2. Is there a way to either drop the break pedal down a little or raise the gas pedal up a little (with preference to the former option)

Leo, my suggestion is only something to ponder, by no means the optimal solution, and definitely not meant as some hate-joke.

If equalizing the height of the brake and accelerator is a goal, ***consider*** adjustable height devices for both, normally marketed to the little person's community.

I realize these may provide too much height, even with the seat all the way back, but they might spark ideas regarding how to DIY build up the lower pedal to match the height of the higher one.

http://www.pedalextenders.com/transaction_detail.php?id=7
 

Creeker

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As a professional engineer and a nationally certified instructor who teaches folks how to drive their cars on the track, I do not agree with the statement "Heel/toe actually increases the wear on the clutch, transmission and engine." My data shows the exact opposite.

Personal experience, I have had two vehicles (Mustang & BMW X3) go over 200,000 miles on the original clutch, engine, transmission, etc. using the heal and toe (H&T)method. H&T's goal, IMHO, when driving is to match the RPM of the motor to the RPM that the drive train so the clutch disk is at the same RPM as the engine. When this is done, there is essentially no wear on the clutch disk, no upsetting the balance of the car, or excessive stress on the drive train, and better control of the vehicle. This is why some cars (e.g., Porsche) have electronics that can match the engine speed to the transmission speed during downshifting.

To accomplish smooth H&T during normal driving, and making a right hand turn, the goal is to do the H&T in the breaking zone that is done in a straight line. Near the end of braking zone, the clutch is seamlessly mated to engine speed (both at about 2500 RPM). At the end of the braking zone, the turn in occurs at about 2000 to 2250 RPM. During this process, the engine / drive train has done little or no braking. At the turn in point one smoothly and gently applies the throttle. After the apex of the turn, the acceleration increases util the track out, at which point normal acceleration occurs to obtain the appropriate speed.

The same is done in racing except at much higher RPMs, speeds, braking rates, and acceleration rates. The goal in both racing and street driving is simple, be smooth, safe, and protect the life of the drive train. A great H&T is not easy. However, when done properly, H&T is a really beautiful thing. I wish I could say that every H&T I do is perfect, it is not. However, after 20 plus years of doing H&T on the track, I have never blown up a drive train or upset the balance of the car to a point where the rear locked up and I spun out. My thoughts: you cannot win the race if you don't finish the race. Of course on the street, one does H&T with lots of margins (e.g., slow speeds, no traffic, ideal conditions, etc.). IMHO, the H&T's that I do on the street are much safer and better for the drive trains then most of the driving I see being done.

I understand there may be those that disagree with me. This is just my $0.015 worth. Flame away.
 

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