JL corrosion

JayJay

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I have a 2018. Zero issues with bubbling, and my Jeep sits outside constantly, in southwest Florida tropical humidity and rain. Why?
It could be that a very small percent of the Jeeps have the problem and that you, and so far myself, are part of the majority.

Later,
Johnny





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JayJay

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I think you’re part of the minority......which in this case is good
If you're right Jay I sure hope that it stays that way. I had an '87 GMC pickup that was built not long after the transition to water based paints. The paint was still peeling in places when I sold it a couple of years ago. I wouldn't want to experience something like that again.

Later,
Johnny
 

Jay 13

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If you're right Jay I sure hope that it stays that way. I had an '87 GMC pickup that was built not long after the transition to water based paints. The paint was still peeling in places when I sold it a couple of years ago. I wouldn't want to experience something like that again.

Later,
Johnny
I hope so, for your sake or anyone else who doesn’t have this (at the moment) and hopefully doesn’t have it occur to have to bother dealing with.

I’ll say that from what I’ve seen is more and more ppl only notice this issue by coming across some of these threads on the issue and then sure enough they go check to find some spots. It sucks!

so I truly believe not everyone may have this issue occur (at least not so early on) but almost every JL in my area that I come across in person....I’d say about 8/10 I see having this issue unfortunately.

it’s a shame really. Even just reading on the forums you find many who have gone to the dealers shops, are informed they’re well aware of this! so that tells me it’s pretty wide spread.

but of course not everyone does. I hope more don’t. All I hope is there a frickin damn fix for this instead of ppl having to

#1 have this occur at all.

#2 FCA do proper prep work on these expensive jeeps to avoid this known issue and provide a true proper fix and therefore a damn proper tsb for the ones that do so it can be corrected CORRECTLY and move on.

#3 because of #1....some have had it repaired only to have the paint work look like a$$ or have the bubbling return again!
Just as @Redneck_Jedi. He knows the unfortunate non sense of that.

just brutal!
What amazes me is how they know it’s an issue and don’t even try and address it on the line. What’s the point of a tsb if you continue to push them out knowing very well your going to spend the money to fix them anyway.

also the tsb proves it’s more wide spread than not.
:mad:
Sorry for the rant, it just :swear: me off
 
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Yogi

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According to my dealer's body shop, Demeyere CDJR, this problem is not specific to Jeep only. It is rampant on Caravan hoods as well.
My dealer's solution is to remove the door hinges from the door, epoxy the bare metal (takes 24 hours to cure) reattach the hinges, and paint.
I've seen the work that comes out of this shop and it is stellar. Mind you this is the first Jeep they have tackled with this issue, but it's a proven process as they have done a couple hundred Caravans.
Mine has it on both hinges on 3 of the 4 doors. The body shop manager has taken pictures, and submitted a request for warranty. I was told it may take a week or two to get an answer.
I have every confidence in my dealer. On a scale of 1 to 10, these guys get an 11. We'll see how it goes.
 

DaltonGang

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According to my dealer's body shop, Demeyere CDJR, this problem is not specific to Jeep only. It is rampant on Caravan hoods as well.
My dealer's solution is to remove the door hinges from the door, epoxy the bare metal (takes 24 hours to cure) reattach the hinges, and paint.
I've seen the work that comes out of this shop and it is stellar. Mind you this is the first Jeep they have tackled with this issue, but it's a proven process as they have done a couple hundred Caravans.
Mine has it on both hinges on 3 of the 4 doors. The body shop manager has taken pictures, and submitted a request for warranty. I was told it may take a week or two to get an answer.
I have every confidence in my dealer. On a scale of 1 to 10, these guys get an 11. We'll see how it goes.
Hopefully word will get around, and every repair shop will be doing it right.
 

HeatBird

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  1. You’re trying to isolate the dissimilar metals.
  2. You put film between the hinge and the door.
  3. Now what about those pesky metal torx bolts?
Nice plan until #3

Pesky bolts
All kinds of products can be applied to the bolts.
 

sost1sg

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I think I’ve got this issue. Waxed the Jeep this weekend and noticed the below. Is this what is being referred to?
706C0ECB-2C5B-498E-9CC8-693BD81FF158.jpeg


D9841E68-B00A-40FA-BC77-1F2331C75D5B.jpeg
 

2020OceanBlue

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The white stuff is galvanic corrosion. Bad stuff. Will spread under the paint and pop the paint off.

Should be using some sort of inert coating/pad between the metal types, and inert material bolts.
Something maybe like a thin piece of rubber, cut to fit of course. Thin like bicycle tire tube thin. Then perhaps a bead of silicone to seal it in?

Thoughts for your engineer types out there??
 

oceanblue2019

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Something maybe like a thin piece of rubber, cut to fit of course. Thin like bicycle tire tube thin. Then perhaps a bead of silicone to seal it in?

Thoughts for your engineer types out there??
Rubber probably too soft, I would use something like a thin layer of teflon tape or other durable material that can compress to fill any small voids and keep water out. Also need to either ensure the bolts do not make contact to the hinge, or go with a inert material.
 

ImAJeepskate

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Rubber probably too soft, I would use something like a thin layer of teflon tape or other durable material that can compress to fill any small voids and keep water out. Also need to either ensure the bolts do not make contact to the hinge, or go with a inert material.
Get those cheap super thin cutting boards, cqnd even color match and cut those to size
 

HeatBird

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Rubber probably too soft, I would use something like a thin layer of teflon tape or other durable material that can compress to fill any small voids and keep water out. Also need to either ensure the bolts do not make contact to the hinge, or go with a inert material.
Too soft for what? Rubber would be perfect as it is obviously very pliable. The pic is of my 84' Carrera. See where the side mirror is attached to the door? There is a rubber gasket there. Worked perfectly well. It was for keeping water out but the mirror housing was aluminum so without it there could have been galvanic corrosion also.
With all that being said if this starts with my Willys I'm taking it back to the dealer the second I see a single friggin bubble. They'll take the hinges off and paint behind them like they should have in Toledo's paint shop.

Porsche_Gasket.jpeg
 

oceanblue2019

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Too soft for what? Rubber would be perfect as it is obviously very pliable. The pic is of my 84' Carrera. See where the side mirror is attached to the door? There is a rubber gasket there. Worked perfectly well. It was for keeping water out but the mirror housing was aluminum so without it there could have been galvanic corrosion also.
With all that being said if this starts with my Willys I'm taking it back to the dealer the second I see a single friggin bubble. They'll take the hinges off and paint behind them like they should have in Toledo's paint shop.

Porsche_Gasket.jpeg
Rubber is a poor material choice for something like a door that is used frequently and has some mass to it.

Very different use case to holding a mirror pod on, and in 1984 they didn't have the material choices they have now. Today that mirror pod is composite.
 

TheBigBadWolf

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Interesting first post for me here.
I had a 2015 JKU WW.
This was happening to the JKs too. Sometime around 2015 they added a gasket in between the two layers to help mitigate this process. I remember getting mine, wondering if it came through with these all important gaskets. You could barely see the thing, but it was there.
I’m a little confused to see this here on the JLs since it seems they made moves to fix it on the JKs.
 

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