IIHS rollover test?

nerubi

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That's hard to argue with that point of view. Last year I celebrated my 50th year in the saddle - Ducati Monster 1200. I've never fallen off on the street. Knock on wood.
Falling isn't the problem. Had one accident where the motorcycle attempted a u-turn on a 4 lane highway and because he had extended forks he made a wide turn and was hit by a car doing 50 mph. When I got there, at 5:00 pm on a hot July day where the asphalt was soft underfoot, there the two were with both having compound fractures of both legs and road and asphalt burns. Still alive. And they tried suing the lady that hit them. Year later had to testify about the accident investigation and they could barely walk.
And I did see a guy with short legs on a Harley at a stop light fall over and it was too heavy for him to get back upright.





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Notorious

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I worked too many motorcycle accidents with dead and live mangled bodies to ever touch a motorcycle.
Yep. It’s horrifying to see human beings become life size rag dolls spread across the asphalt because they didn’t wear a full helmet nor did they choose to dress for the slide instead of the ride.

No one needs to see this. Ever. Granted, we already knew the driver was a dummy - there was no need for him to become one.
 

Sean L

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Almost all vehicles are built that way. They have to be, otherwise the tires would scrub the frame rails when they turn and articulate.
Of course I understand why it was built that way, but it still seems to me that in the small overlap testing with the Wrangler it does contribute to the tipover. In the moderate overlap testing, the Jeep doesn't have this problem as the very front of the frame takes the hit and performs as designed. IIHS hasn't released a video of that test though. :asshat:
 
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timn1984

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Nothing goofy, they'll analyze the crash tests and figure out what the root cause of the tip over was. The downside of all of our off road goodies it that it makes the Jeep top-heavy so its an engineering challenge to keep it upright in a collision. It should also be noted that while the Jeep in the test did wind up on its side, the passenger compartment stayed intact better than the Toyota 4Runner's compartment.

Well with my limited knowledge of crash tests, and specifically this weird crash test (hitting a fixed object full speed) and seeing that video, I think I would rather roll and possibly survive than get smashed and certainly die in a low-rider sedan. Just my opinion.
 

Sean L

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Well with my limited knowledge of crash tests, and specifically this weird crash test (hitting a fixed object full speed) and seeing that video, I think I would rather roll and possibly survive than get smashed and certainly die in a low-rider sedan. Just my opinion.
I don't think I'd consider it to be a weird test, but more along the lines of a demonstration of how well the vehicle holds up to an impact. Apart from tipping over, I am satisfied at how well the Jeep held up. I am curious as to what the barrier FCA used in their own testing looked like.
 

timn1984

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I don't think I'd consider it to be a weird test, but more along the lines of a demonstration of how well the vehicle holds up to an impact. Apart from tipping over, I am satisfied at how well the Jeep held up. I am curious as to what the barrier FCA used in their own testing looked like.
Yes, good point. also it looked like a plastic bumper from what I could tell, I wonder what a metal bumper would do in the same test?
 

Sean L

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Yes, good point. also it looked like a plastic bumper from what I could tell, I wonder what a metal bumper would do in the same test?
Aftermarket bumpers would do better I bet. With the Mopar steel bumper I have, that endcap would just sheer off and I'd have the same result.
 

Rico1111

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I thought it held up well! These vehicles are narrow and top heavy...specially the 4 door! I would venture to say the 2 door would be impacted and the back end would rise up and skip to the right, possibly turning outward. A wider stance would probably mitigate this on the unlimited! The passenger was fine ..the cockpit held up! Isn't this about the occupant? I don't care if the Jeep is toast! It kept the driver intact...albeit some bruizing due to airbags and being knocked around.
 

emptyminded42

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Well with my limited knowledge of crash tests, and specifically this weird crash test (hitting a fixed object full speed) and seeing that video, I think I would rather roll and possibly survive than get smashed and certainly die in a low-rider sedan. Just my opinion.
Modern sedans and hatchbacks do just fine in small overlap crashes. Likely better than body-on-frame vehicles specifically because they don't roll over.

See the following video for a 2014 Mazda3 hatchback (same generation as my daily driver) which scored the highest possible (Good) for the small overlap test:


Rollovers are bad. Period.

I don't think I'd consider it to be a weird test, but more along the lines of a demonstration of how well the vehicle holds up to an impact. Apart from tipping over, I am satisfied at how well the Jeep held up. I am curious as to what the barrier FCA used in their own testing looked like.
I do think the results are pretty good aside from the rollover. Rollovers are bad - unpredictable and not many safety systems are designed to account for it. But, I don't think any Jeep owner prioritizes safety considering our doors and roofs are removable.
 

Sean L

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I'm just saying that pretty much all ladder frames are built that way and there's no real way around it. If the other vehicles don't exhibit the behavior and have a very similar shape....that's not the underlying cause of the tip over.
Yes, but not all ladder frames are identical. Here's a Ram 1500 frame vs the Wrangler frame for reference.

1589463077964.png


1589463294731.png


You'll note in the slow motion portions of the IIHS video of the wrangler that the tipover does not begin until the vehicle hits that point where the frame widens out. A better bumper could help out in this situation I'm sure, but the shape of the Jeep's frame does appear to be a contributing factor.
 

Badweissenbier

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Energy has to go somewhere. So choice here - all of the energy absorbed straight towards the driver through the vehicle, or part of that energy straight towards the driver and part used laying it on its side.
I think I might take the latter.
Kinda don’t care about the vehicular damage as much as my own damage at that point.
As they say , seat belts and keep your hands and arms inside the ride at all times.
 

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