How to rotate tires?

SSinGA

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So I meant to do a 5 tire rotation every 5k miles, but I lost track of mileage then had a long trip before I could rotate. So I’m at 8k miles on 4 with a fresh spare on the back. What would you guys recommend to catch the spare up over the next couple of rotations?
Put it on the primary drive rear wheel and light it up!





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BLACKMOAB

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Sorry if this is a stupid question...
Do you have to do anything with the TPMS after rotation? Like, tell the TPMS where the tires are etc.?
Yes, you will need to tell each TPMS where the tires are but be sure to speak loudly and concisely into the valve stem as it’s hard for them to hear you through the thick rubber of the tires. :like:
 

Rhinebeck01

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Sorry if this is a stupid question...
Do you have to do anything with the TPMS after rotation? Like, tell the TPMS where the tires are etc.?
@rmasonjr

No such thing as "a stupid question".

In regard to your JL's TPMS:

-
How does the JL/JLU know which tire/rim/wheel is where .....

Well, there are 3 sensors on the chassis that monitor the 4 TPMS Sensors found on the 4 tire (rim) positions.

Info from the 3 chassis sensors is transmitted to the Wireless Control Module. There is no need for a 4th chassis sensor as the computer uses the process of elimination to determine the fourth tire location.

Yes, your JLU/JL knows exactly which rim is where, usually within seconds of a tire rotation for example. Yes, It's all done automatically.

There is a TPMS sensor in the factory mounted spare but it is not read by a chassis sensor/ considered by the computer until it is placed in one of the 4 tire positions.
 

The Last Cowboy

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I knew this would turn into a shit show. A guy actually realted not doing a 5 tire rotation to a vehicle not lasting long beyond the warranty. Wow.

I have a great idea, let’s talk about oil and filters, especially Amsoil.
 

jeepoch

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For the record the statement:

"or ignore it like most people do and wonder why their vehicles never last much past their warranty"

was only a 'tongue-in-cheek' quip to highlight how very little some people actually take car of their cars.

It's certainly not that if you don't rotate your tires every few hundred miles your vehicle is going to disintegrate. Come on...

I'm truly amazed at how 'literal' people read things.



Also to complete the earlier differential discussion, yes the spider gears within the carriage frame are the load bearing components within the differential.

When traveling straight, (with similarly worn tires) the spider gears don't spin. All load is evenly transfered to BOTH wheels evenly (50/50%).

However with a wheel with a different diameter, the spider gear will spin within the carriage frame, just like it would during cornering. The transfer energy to each wheel is now different and no longer balanced.

The wheel with the least resistance, the tire with the shorter circumference (smaller diameter) will now get the higher percentage of power since its rotating faster (higher RPM). This imbalanced load transfer does indeed create frictional contact points between the spider and axle gears simply because they are now spinning . Recall, going forward in a straight line the spider gears DO NOT spin. Anything else they will. Either clockwise or counter clockwise depending on which wheel is rotating faster.

Friction occurs on moving elements of contact not stationary. The highest efficiency of any open differential is when the greatest number of contact points are stopped and not rotating. Anything else increases friction, heat, drag and loss of available motive power.

So rotate (or don't rotate) your tires, you be the judge on whether its beneficial with more of the physics considered.

What you do is up to you. All I can do is help you see the bigger picture. Ignore it or not.


Also feel free to criticize all you want. I perform both 5 tire rotations, along with a computerized wheel rebalance every 5K miles. I like getting 22+ miles per gallon and the longest possible tire life. You do what you want. It's your Jeep and your wallet.

Happy Jeeping.
Jay

For reference, here is my rig (not that it much matters), but I do take my rubber seriously.

IMG_20200801_200022.jpg
 

neil

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I've always used this pattern every 3k miles, especially with md terrain tires!!!. Why leave a brand new tire on the back to rot?
jeep tire rotation.png
This is what the cool people do.
 

WhereRU_A-A-Ron

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Okay, so HOW are you guys rotating your tires? Do you do a few tires at a time or put the Jeep on jack stands and do all of them at once. What’s your process? What saves you time? Does your dealership do it correctly?

I have a jack and a few jack stands but that’s it. I can definitely invest in more equipment if needed.
 

Zandcwhite

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Okay, so HOW are you guys rotating your tires? Do you do a few tires at a time or put the Jeep on jack stands and do all of them at once. What’s your process? What saves you time? Does your dealership do it correctly?

I have a jack and a few jack stands but that’s it. I can definitely invest in more equipment if needed.
I do passenger side 1st, then drivers side. That way 2 tires stay on the ground for maximum stability and minimum equipment needed.
 

neil

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Okay, so HOW are you guys rotating your tires? Do you do a few tires at a time or put the Jeep on jack stands and do all of them at once. What’s your process? What saves you time? Does your dealership do it correctly?

I have a jack and a few jack stands but that’s it. I can definitely invest in more equipment if needed.
A 5 tire rotation you only need lift one wheel before changing that tire, leave the jack stands in the garage, follow the diagram that the cool kids use above. Pull spare first and move to passenger rear like diagram says, then more passenger rear where diagram says.

To save time break lugs before lifting. Three clicks at 130 on the ground and your done.
 

R3TRO

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Since the Jeep has a full size spare and pretty aggressive tires (I have M/T on my Willys) a 5-way rotation makes sense on it around 5K miles. Matter of fact this weekend I'm planning on rotating them and even bought a second jack to make my life easier.

Not going to lie though... On our two commuter cars, I just wait until the front tires need to be replaced then go to Discount Tire and have them move the backs to the front (they usually have 75% tread left on them) and put brand new tires on the back. I see two advantages to this... it spreads the cost out since you only need to replace two tires at a time and I never have to find the time to rotate the tires! I'm sure there's a flaw to my logic, but it has served me well for years! :)
 

jeepoch

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Steve,

If your two commuter cars are both 2WD vehicles then your logic is only flawed by how long you wait to purchase new rubber.

If the rear tires are nearly as worn as the front, then overall safety is less than optimum.

If either vehicle is front wheel drive, then you're putting the tires with the worst tread (therefore least amount of tractive effort) on your powered wheels increasing your chance for slip. Living in Southern California (Pasadena is a pretty cool place by the way), poses no problems. However, if you lived here in Colorado this strategy would cause you all kinds of grief.

As you are aware, tire dealers are mandated to only put (two) new tires on the rear only, regardless of what type of car you have. The theory is to ensure maximum braking grip on the rear tires in order to prevent fish-tailing on heavy braking. With your strategy in snow your front tires would just spin trying to get traction in order to start moving. Quite aggrevating when your struggling to get going at a traffic light with the big bad-ass AWD SUV riding your butt while your more worn front tires are just spinning and going nowhere. Here (or nearly anywhere other than SoCal), you want your best rubber up front.

If your two commuter cars are AWD vehicles, then your fancy dancy cool transfer case will certainly not like the extra binding energy due to dissimilar tire diameters. A good recipe for higher than normal excessive drivetrain wear.

You're lucky you live where you do. Sounds like you are certainly using this to your advantage.

Nice job.
Jay
 

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