Ground tent vs RTT

Myron

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We've been tent campers forever. I liked being able to use the same basic gear for canoe camping and backpacking and car camping. But we are older now and the kids are out of the house. Sleeping on the ground has gotten to be no fun and I want a good night's sleep. So we've decided to try an Autohome Maggiolina, but instead of mounting it to the vehicle, I'm going to put it on the small trailer we sometimes tow on longer trips. It will be about 3-4 feet off the ground, and the vehicle is freed up.

Restful sleep off the ground, something to leave behind and "claim" your campsite, and the Jeep freed up for that trip into the nearest town for a beer run or whatever. Problem solved.





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zb39

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I agree with this. Thats why my trailer is now a coach and I pull the jeep. We can go for weeks with zero issues.
To be honest packing and unpacking was my top reason for a trailer, makes camping easier and less stressful knowing everything is one place. Cons it’s more difficult to take a trailer on difficult trails, Pro setting up “base camp” and going out exploring in the Jeep.
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Bryce

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Ground tent vs RTT has evolved into towing Trailers to RV's towing Jeeps, lol.
Here.. I'll circle it back.

I have a soft top, so, no rack for a RTT. I really dont want RTT or the extra high up weight it'll add any how.

Honestly, I sleep in a little 2 person tent that I also use for MC camping and backpacking on my Jeep trips.
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We do have a 26ft bunkhouse style TT that I pull behind a 3/4 Ton F250 PSD. Looking at selling it now that the kids are older and getting something in a different configuration. Maybe something small enough to go behind the jeep and get more off the beaten path than the big TT can handle

Oops. Brought it completely around 360°:LOL:
 

JimLee

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I've seen a lot of people that say they don't want a RTT or a rack on their vehicle when they are not out camping. With the Rhino backbone system you can easily remove the rack, just the mounts are left behind, they even sell caps to put over the mounts to make them look nice. I plan on making an A-frame support with a cheap HF winch. When done camping back it in, hook up the winch and hoist both the RTT and rack off the jeep. I could even hoist the entire hardtop with rack and RTT if I ever desired to go topless, which I probably never will. Anyway, a roof rack doesn't need to be a forever thing, or even a PITA to remove in between camping trips. I'm 100% going RTT, I ground camped too much in my life and I hate it.
 

AdamEaton

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I've seen a lot of people that say they don't want a RTT or a rack on their vehicle when they are not out camping. With the Rhino backbone system you can easily remove the rack, just the mounts are left behind, they even sell caps to put over the mounts to make them look nice. I plan on making an A-frame support with a cheap HF winch. When done camping back it in, hook up the winch and hoist both the RTT and rack off the jeep. I could even hoist the entire hardtop with rack and RTT if I ever desired to go topless, which I probably never will. Anyway, a roof rack doesn't need to be a forever thing, or even a PITA to remove in between camping trips. I'm 100% going RTT, I ground camped too much in my life and I hate it.
I will be keeping mine on. The MPG and handling impact I found to be minimal. I will be doing accutune shocks and synergy 2" springs to make up for it. I cancelled my order for quick release tent mounts after the first outing. I dont see the need to take it off and if I do it will be once a year for ski season.
 

Myron

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Love that RoofNest.
 

Dkretden

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I've seen a lot of people that say they don't want a RTT or a rack on their vehicle when they are not out camping. With the Rhino backbone system you can easily remove the rack, just the mounts are left behind, they even sell caps to put over the mounts to make them look nice. I plan on making an A-frame support with a cheap HF winch. When done camping back it in, hook up the winch and hoist both the RTT and rack off the jeep. I could even hoist the entire hardtop with rack and RTT if I ever desired to go topless, which I probably never will. Anyway, a roof rack doesn't need to be a forever thing, or even a PITA to remove in between camping trips. I'm 100% going RTT, I ground camped too much in my life and I hate it.
Good points.

but, then there are city dwellers like me who live in residential downtown highrises and have a JL as a DD. We have to park in the building parking garages and have literally no facilities to take stuff off when done or mount stuff on when needed or store the stuff taken off........ and we really need to watch out for garage max heights!

In the total Jeep community, we are likely FEW in numbers but there are some and I am one of them — and so are the dozen or so other jeep owners who also live in this same building.

RTTs probably won’t work for me. Of course I could rent a storage locker somewhere go there at the beginning of the trip and put everything on (assuming that my wife who is 5’ tall and 100 pounds could actually help get a 110 pound RTT lifted to the top of the Jeep). Then head immediately out on the trip. Then at the end of a long trip, immediately go to the storage locker and take it all off, then go home. But that seems like a PITA to me.

Therefore, it seems given my lifestyle that Ground tents are the best, simple, alternative I think for the few Jeepers who have chosen to live in urban settings without access to personal garages. I think that the next best option might be a trailer that can be stored somewhere that is already set up and all you need do is hookup and go.....

I would be very interested to hear from any Jeepers who live in Urban “highrise” settings (no personal garages or storage) how you are solving this question of RTT vs Ground tent.
 
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imbuere

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Depending on where in BC you are, I'd check out hammock camping if you haven't. Light weight, doesn't take up much space, very comfortable. I did a lot of that on Vancouver Island and the Olympic Peninsula.
This is where it’s at.
 

JimLee

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Good points.

but, then there are city dwellers like me who live in residential downtown highrises and have a JL as a DD. We have to park in the building parking garages and have literally no facilities to take stuff off when done or mount stuff on when needed or store the stuff taken off........ and we really need to watch out for garage max heights!

In the total Jeep community, we are likely FEW in numbers but there are some and I am one of them — and so are the dozen or so other jeep owners who also live in this same building.

RTTs probably won’t work for me. Of course I could rent a storage locker somewhere go there at the beginning of the trip and put everything on (assuming that my wife who is 5’ tall and 100 pounds could actually help get a 110 pound RTT lifted to the top of the Jeep). Then head immediately out on the trip. Then at the end of a long trip, immediately go to the storage locker and take it all off, then go home. But that seems like a PITA to me.

Therefore, it seems given my lifestyle that Ground tents are the best, simple, alternative I think for the few Jeepers who have chosen to live in urban settings without access to personal garages. I think that the next best option might be a trailer that can be stored somewhere that is already set up and all you need do is hookup and go.....

I would be very interested to hear from any Jeepers who live in Urban “highrise” settings (no personal garages or storage) how you are solving this question of RTT vs Ground tent.
I agree that your circumstances play a very big role in how you decide on camping gear. Also what you like to do. I chose not to have a trailer setup because Im not big on camping in one spot for more than a night and then having to return to it, id rather be moving toward something. I also dont want to try and drag one of these newer offroad trailers through tough terrain. I think I can honestly assess my abilities as high enough to drive a well equipped jeep through the Rubicon with a RTT but not high enough to drag 2 more wheels and that much extra wheelbase through a trail like that. Maybe someday, but not today.
 

av8or

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I decided against a RTT because, bottom line, I want more room. I don’t like being that confined if the weather is bad, or I wake up early and want to get up. I have a Coleman instant tent that’s big enough for a queen sized mattress, a chair, and a Mr Heater. I can stand up in a nice warm tent to “take a bath” and get dressed before the sun comes up. I’ve had friends with RTTs hanging out in there with me when’s it’s cold outside. I know a person could add an annex, but them you’re adding more setup time and you’re back on the ground again anyway.


Also the only rig I saw on it’s side on my rubicon trip had a RTT.
 

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I sometimes carry my 6 person tent, holds cot, chair, table and more, on the roof.

JL roof rack 1.jpg

big enough inside for comfort options
coleman 6 person tent.jpeg

too big to carry inside my JLR
JL rear cargo.jpg
 

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I sometimes carry my 6 person tent, holds cot, chair, table and more, on the roof.

JL roof rack 1.jpg

big enough inside for comfort options
coleman 6 person tent.jpeg

too big to carry inside my JLR
JL rear cargo.jpg
nice set up.
 

JimLee

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I decided against a RTT because, bottom line, I want more room. I don’t like being that confined if the weather is bad, or I wake up early and want to get up. I have a Coleman instant tent that’s big enough for a queen sized mattress, a chair, and a Mr Heater. I can stand up in a nice warm tent to “take a bath” and get dressed before the sun comes up. I’ve had friends with RTTs hanging out in there with me when’s it’s cold outside. I know a person could add an annex, but them you’re adding more setup time and you’re back on the ground again anyway.


Also the only rig I saw on it’s side on my rubicon trip had a RTT.
Everyone's usage will definitely be tailored to their needs and what they want to do. I honestly think the RTT vs ground camping vs camping trailer debate is kinda like comparing apples to oranges to bananas. The needs and usages of people is so varied that the comparisons quickly dont make sense. I'd personally like to eventually be set up to use any of the three with minimal effort going into reconfiguring for specific trips. There are alot of trails in America tougher than the Rubicon, a couple out where i live that I would certainly never take a RTT or trailer on, but those would be day trips for me, or i would take a ground tent if i wanted to stay out there. If i was going to Moab for a week id like to have a trailer setup that I could drive away from and return to or just get a room like 90% of others do. I think people need to figure out what they want to do and how they want to do it, and then decide what setup is best for them. Rock crawling, overlanding, and just plain camping are very different sports even though they can somewhat be combined.

Edit: I do know one thing, ground camping will work in almost any situation, i always carry a small tent with me any time im offroading in case of emergency need
 
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