Snow tyres

XJrider

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Nitto muds..? Shit.. I could plow a yard with a 350 dualy wearing cheap all seasons tires without issue. That’s a no brainer. information. Best and safest performing tires in extreme winter conditions for acceleration, stopping, lateral control and step out recovery and emergency manoeuvres...? dedicated winters.. hands down.. no question. The soft compared, specialized sipping and treads are fat superior. And you.. for the first time just admitted that do they perform better. Nice to see you coming along.

As far as swapping them over..seriously? that’s a 30 min job you do yourself. I guess it’s a matter of life experience. EVERYONE up here has a set for each vehicle sitting in their garage waiting for fall. Perhaps in shorter milder winter conditions it not really necessary. Up here it is.

And finally.. as much as you would like to think otherwise.. it’s a fact that the majority of Jeep owners run their machines stock or close to. Shit.. half the JL’s out there won’t see anything harsher than a dirt road. So your argument there has zero merit. I run 33’s in the summer and my winters are 32.7’s.

Now.. if you want to talk about the best A/T tire in the winter.. you will more than likely not attract much debate from anyone.
I heard zambonis are also running KO2s. When they are not using Nitto muds, naturally.
Not going to waste more time on this. Its a stupid idea to swap 37’s or 35’s in ANY tire for a dedicated snow tire on a 4wd truck. Complete waste of time. Yu guys are likely first time buyers ... but Very few if anyone thats into/experienced in 4wheeling trails, rock crawling etc...would ever do something as stupid as swap out an at ,hybrid or mud tire for a 255 snow tire...





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Vedder

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Not going to waste more time on this. Its a stupid idea to swap 37’s or 35’s in ANY tire for a dedicated snow tire on a 4wd truck. Complete waste of time. Yu guys are likely first time buyers ... but Very few if anyone thats into/experienced in 4wheeling trails, rock crawling etc...would ever do something as stupid as swap out an at ,hybrid or mud tire for a 255 snow tire...
The people asking for the best snow tires are not currently running 35’s or 37’s. Your information and advice is for another crowd. Try and pay attention.
 

XJrider

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The people asking for the best snow tires are not currently running 35’s or 37’s. Your information and advice is for another crowd. Try and pay attention.
doesnt make your idea more viable...[/QUOTE]
 

Vedder

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doesnt make your idea more viable...
[/QUOTE]

Nah.. It just makes your thoughts and opinions nothing less that completely irrelevant. Topic comprehension is a real struggle with you. Which explains why you keep jumping around all over the place with examples that have nothing to do with OP question. Your lack of experience in a variety of winter conditions with various tires is quite evident.
 

colojeepr

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We took our JLUR up to Steamboat Springs last weekend for some cross country skiing and alpine enjoyment. It was the first real opportunity I've had to test it out in deep snow as weather along the front range has been a bit stingy with any sort of deep snow accumulation.

There was roughly a meter of base in town and the surrounding area, temps were between -20 and -14C throughout the stay. While we were there, it snowed both days getting 15cm during day one and a continual dusting on day two so pretty typical alpine conditions. Our jeep is equipped with the KO2s which have roughly 4,800 miles on them. Hopefully this gives the OP some context for my observations.

The reality is that the KO2s are merely adequate in those conditions. They have enough grip to cut a path through the fresh snow and generally behave themselves on roads that have been plowed and sanded. When went up Rabbit Ears pass (elev 2872m) on the way up and out of town. The road was pretty icy as we started the climb and the KO2s were no better than the typical passenger radial. So we took is slow and left quite a bit of following distance. I we climbed into the higher, colder air the road turned into hard packed snow and the performance of tire was good. It had adequate grip for driving. Braking performance was less than inspiring when a random snowmobile stopped to take a selfie while crossing the road. Alas, there is no cure for stupid.

To get to the root of the question, what about snow tires? I would definitely have snow tires on the Jeep if we lived in Steamboat or any other alpine town. Which one? Probably the Nokian Hakkapeliitta 9s. They come in a 265/70R17 and are amazing. Runner up would be the Blizzak DM. We had these on our Audi and the thing went like a tank.

@Vedder is right. Four wheel drive is a glorious thing for propelling a vehicle when it has traction. Unfortunately it won't have very good traction without wearing the right shoes (tires). You wouldn't wear leather dress shoes trudging up a frozen mountain; instead you'd wear outdoor boots (good), probably winter boots (better) and ideally crampons (best). It is the same thing with our Jeeps. They need the right compounds, traction patterns and sometimes studs to match the performance our vehicles are capable of achieving.
 

Vedder

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A7DB312A-9715-4B56-8C57-2B9EF2A96EDE.jpeg
We took our JLUR up to Steamboat Springs last weekend for some cross country skiing and alpine enjoyment. It was the first real opportunity I've had to test it out in deep snow as weather along the front range has been a bit stingy with any sort of deep snow accumulation.

There was roughly a meter of base in town and the surrounding area, temps were between -20 and -14C throughout the stay. While we were there, it snowed both days getting 15cm during day one and a continual dusting on day two so pretty typical alpine conditions. Our jeep is equipped with the KO2s which have roughly 4,800 miles on them. Hopefully this gives the OP some context for my observations.

The reality is that the KO2s are merely adequate in those conditions. They have enough grip to cut a path through the fresh snow and generally behave themselves on roads that have been plowed and sanded. When went up Rabbit Ears pass (elev 2872m) on the way up and out of town. The road was pretty icy as we started the climb and the KO2s were no better than the typical passenger radial. So we took is slow and left quite a bit of following distance. I we climbed into the higher, colder air the road turned into hard packed snow and the performance of tire was good. It had adequate grip for driving. Braking performance was less than inspiring when a random snowmobile stopped to take a selfie while crossing the road. Alas, there is no cure for stupid.

To get to the root of the question, what about snow tires? I would definitely have snow tires on the Jeep if we lived in Steamboat or any other alpine town. Which one? Probably the Nokian Hakkapeliitta 9s. They come in a 265/70R17 and are amazing. Runner up would be the Blizzak DM. We had these on our Audi and the thing went like a tank.

@Vedder is right. Four wheel drive is a glorious thing for propelling a vehicle when it has traction. Unfortunately it won't have very good traction without wearing the right shoes (tires). You wouldn't wear leather dress shoes trudging up a frozen mountain; instead you'd wear outdoor boots (good), probably winter boots (better) and ideally crampons (best). It is the same thing with our Jeeps. They need the right compounds, traction patterns and sometimes studs to match the performance our vehicles are capable of achieving.
Thanks for sharing your detailed perspective on your recent experience. I obviously agree.

I was planning on trying the Hakka’s this year for the first time but we got surprised by an early winter and they were going to take a few weeks to come in so I went with the DMV2’s in 265/70/18. They perform very well.. especially for braking. I don’t take my car out much in winter because 500hp and rear wheel drive can make for a bit much excitement at times lol. But.. I do have WS80’s in the car and they are amazing... even a bit better than the DM’s imho. Just a testament of the level of performance from quality winters. Going to try Hakka’s next time for sure though.
 

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