Winching/Recovery 101

ECHO

Well-Known Member
First Name
Craig
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
424
Reaction score
513
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2-Door JL Rubicon - Black
Occupation
Retired Air Force - Currently in my Dream Job
Searched around and didn't see anything that focused on the basic's of Recovery and Winching .. Lets call this a live thread and make changes and add info as needed


When attempting a recovery or winching someone else's POS or very expensive JEEP, keep in mind you really need to know what your doing.. "It's not just Hook it up and pull it out". Safety of the persons and equipment must be considered.. don't be that guy/gal that has an Ooop's moment and does some serious damage or death.. Yeah death is always a possibility if you are doing it wrong.

Let us start with a quick equipment review ..

Recovery Straps
(General Info) Straps come in several types and have specific uses - Ensure you are using a strap that is rated for what you are trying to accomplish

Tree Strap - Used to wrap around a tree and attach with a shackle

Tow Strap - Used to pull out or tow a vehicle with

Snatch Strap / catapult / Kentic Energy- used for pulling out of sand or other loose surfaces with both vehicles in motion

fereet.png



Shackles -
(General info) Shackles come in various sizes shapes and strengths - Most common off road shackle is the "D"Ring Shackle - Ensure you are using one with the strength to do job safely.

778.jpg



thOMJ05OLV.jpg


shackle_load_fig1.jpg


These came out a few years back and work just great and are easier to use -

Soft_-Shackle_gator.png



Winches -
(General Info) Several types and costs - General rule is to have one that will safely recovery 1.5 times the amount of weight your are pulling (see mechanical advantage to increase pulling strength)

Snatch Block -
(General Info) They are called snatch blocks because they are often used in conjunction with a winch in a recovery application, and can improve the functionality of a winch by increasing its pull power. It also allows you to change the direction of your winch’s cable when the anchor point is offset.

WSB.jpg


Mechanical Advantage

Definition:

me·chan·i·cal ad·van·tage
[mechanical advantage]
NOUN
  1. the ratio of the force produced by a machine to the force applied to it, used in assessing the performance of a machine.
2. Mechanical advantage is a measure of the force amplification achieved by using a tool, mechanical device or machine system. Ideally, the device preserves the input power and simply trades off forces against movement to obtain a desired amplification in the output force. The model for this is the law of the lever.

this is where it gets fun !!!

Single-Double-Triple-Pull2.jpg




xwinching-directional-pull-tree1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.4oBoRJKaz0.jpg
industrialwinches10.png



When Winching or doing you own recovery, always use a weighted line blanket or a hoodie with rocks in the pocket if need be.. If a equipment failure happens you want the line to hit the ground - not anything else..

wrn-91575_ml.jpg


Always stand clear to the sides and never between the recovering and recovered vehicle !!!!!!

Here are a few more basics to remember that I remember off the top of my head from a recovery course.

1) Only the hook end of the winch line should be moving. Never hook up the winch and drive backwards. Use kinetic recovery strap to frame mounted tow points for that.
2) When winching someone else, put your transmission in neutral and your foot on the brake, the other vehicle should be in D or R to assist the winch pull.
3) Always keep tension on the line whenever it's being powered in or out of the winch drum.
4) Always wear gloves, stay more than an arm's length from the fairlead, and never let the rope slide through your hand-use a hand-over-hand motion to control the rope.
5) Don't use too little winch rope. Your winch operates more effectively when you are not concentrating all of the use on the same first twenty feet of rope. Use a pulley block whenever the distance you are from the anchor point is 40 percent of the length of your winch line or less to increase your pulling power by using the lower layers on the drum.
6) Never hook onto a tow ball.
7) Keep at least 5 wraps of line on the drum (8 if using synthetic rope)
8) Always drape a blanket (parachute) over the cable.
9) If using a winch hook, connect it with the open side up.
10) Never wrap the line around an anchor point and then connect the hook back to the cable.
11. AVOID - doing a pull recovery in reverse … The reverse gear is the weakest gear in the transmission, if it all possible turn your jeep around and pull


I hope this helps with some basic info .. if anyone has anything to add.. post it up and I will add it to the original post .. here's to many safe recoveries if needed :beer:





Advertisement

 
Last edited:
OP
ECHO

ECHO

Well-Known Member
First Name
Craig
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
424
Reaction score
513
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2-Door JL Rubicon - Black
Occupation
Retired Air Force - Currently in my Dream Job
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Updated with more info
 

ivy8

New Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2019
Messages
1
Reaction score
3
Location
Michigan
Vehicle(s)
2017 JKU
Very nice write up!

I’m new to off roading, but I’ve got 20 year’s experience in racing sailboats, and 10 years working in an industry where really heavy things have to move.

Snatch blocks get their name because you can hook them to a rope/line/cable that is connected at both ends, and may already be under load. In sailboat speak, they can “snatch” a working line. Regular blocks need to have rope threaded through them the hard way.

You might also consider adding a bit on the breaking strength of ropes and cables. The strength of a rope goes down by turning through a block, and many knots reduce breaking strength by 50%. The best mountains climbing knots are about a 20-30% reduction. Always use ropes with breaking strengths far in excess of what you need.

This article covers some of the basics. https://www.lift-it.com/info-rope-use-inspection
 
OP
ECHO

ECHO

Well-Known Member
First Name
Craig
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
424
Reaction score
513
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2-Door JL Rubicon - Black
Occupation
Retired Air Force - Currently in my Dream Job
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
Very nice write up!

I’m new to off roading, but I’ve got 20 year’s experience in racing sailboats, and 10 years working in an industry where really heavy things have to move.

Snatch blocks get their name because you can hook them to a rope/line/cable that is connected at both ends, and may already be under load. In sailboat speak, they can “snatch” a working line. Regular blocks need to have rope threaded through them the hard way.

You might also consider adding a bit on the breaking strength of ropes and cables. The strength of a rope goes down by turning through a block, and many knots reduce breaking strength by 50%. The best mountains climbing knots are about a 20-30% reduction. Always use ropes with breaking strengths far in excess of what you need.

This article covers some of the basics. https://www.lift-it.com/info-rope-use-inspection

Great info ! Thanks ..
 

Andy2434

Well-Known Member
First Name
Andy
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
861
Reaction score
1,026
Location
Las Vegas/San Francisco
Vehicle(s)
'19 Billet JLUR, '20 Mustang GT, 6MT
Occupation
Retired/Leisure
Thanks for posting the info. It's a good starting point for many.
 
OP
ECHO

ECHO

Well-Known Member
First Name
Craig
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
424
Reaction score
513
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2-Door JL Rubicon - Black
Occupation
Retired Air Force - Currently in my Dream Job
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8

Tunesoul

Well-Known Member
First Name
Kirk
Joined
Jan 28, 2018
Messages
486
Reaction score
602
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
1999 Jeep Wrangler Sport, 2012 Subaru Outback, 2018 Ocean Blue JLUR
Occupation
Owner of a Mobile Auto Paint Touch Up Co.
Very nice writeup and visual graphics. Good job. What about the position of the hook when doing a pull? Should the closed end face up or face down? I've heard facing it up (with the open clasp end facing down) decreases the chances of it being launched skyward in the event of a failure. Any thoughts?
 
OP
ECHO

ECHO

Well-Known Member
First Name
Craig
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
424
Reaction score
513
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2-Door JL Rubicon - Black
Occupation
Retired Air Force - Currently in my Dream Job
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
Very nice writeup and visual graphics. Good job. What about the position of the hook when doing a pull? Should the closed end face up or face down? I've heard facing it up (with the open clasp end facing down) decreases the chances of it being launched skyward in the event of a failure. Any thoughts?
To be honest hooks scare me.. I have always used a thimble .. I trust factor 55 products in that regard
 

Tunesoul

Well-Known Member
First Name
Kirk
Joined
Jan 28, 2018
Messages
486
Reaction score
602
Location
California
Vehicle(s)
1999 Jeep Wrangler Sport, 2012 Subaru Outback, 2018 Ocean Blue JLUR
Occupation
Owner of a Mobile Auto Paint Touch Up Co.
Very nice writeup and visual graphics. Good job. What about the position of the hook when doing a pull? Should the closed end face up or face down? I've heard facing it up (with the open clasp end facing down) decreases the chances of it being launched skyward in the event of a failure. Any thoughts?
Or is it the opposite?
 

ResponsibleAdult

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
8,742
Reaction score
52,799
Location
Ontario, Canada
Vehicle(s)
2018 JLU, Rubicon, Mojito
I’m new to this as well.

Please explain the hoodie/weighted bag. Where does it need to be placed for safety?
 

UNC Rubicon

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bret
Joined
Mar 27, 2018
Messages
1,284
Reaction score
2,015
Location
Kernersville, NC
Vehicle(s)
2019 Billet Silver JLUR
Vehicle Showcase
1
I’m new to this as well.

Please explain the hoodie/weighted bag. Where does it need to be placed for safety?
If the rope or cable breaks, the weight will pull it down rather than allowing it to be a projectile. Put the weight near the center of the rope/cable.
 

ResponsibleAdult

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
8,742
Reaction score
52,799
Location
Ontario, Canada
Vehicle(s)
2018 JLU, Rubicon, Mojito
If the rope or cable breaks, the weight will pull it down rather than allowing it to be a projectile. Put the weight near the center of the rope/cable.
Thanks! I understood the purpose, but not where it should go. Appreciate the clarification. :like:
 

Chocolate Thunder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
2,768
Reaction score
3,704
Location
Texas
Vehicle(s)
2019 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon
How many soft shackles is enough for a recovery kit? I’ve got two 3/4” 10” diameter ones. I was thinking of having 2 more just to be covered. Will a couple of 15” ones be good or is larger than 10” unnecessary?
 

Advertisement




Icon Vehicle Dynamics
 



Advertisement
Top