Why Rubicon instead of Sport S when upgrading tires?

OnlyOne

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Lol. A vehicle is not an investment.
It is as soon as you’re getting ready to trade it in, or sell it. Otherwise you would just give it to them.......





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OnlyOne

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Stronger axles, lockers f/r, higher fender flares for more tire on less lift, 4:1 tcase, electronically unlocking sway bar.

Just to name a few things. To get a sport outfitted with the above you're be paying north of the $10k delta and it's still not a rubicon for resale value.
This, is why. Also, just try and buy upgraded axles for 10K. Everyone likes to upgrade. It’s a Jeep, and fun. That being said, I wheel the crap out of all my jeeps and can count on one hand how many times I actually needed to use the lockers. For 99% of the owners here, the bone stock Sport with the smallest tire available, will take them places way, way past their comfort level.

I’m also glad I didn’t read this entires thread. I can only imagine the BS.
 
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FrankieFJL

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Just more flexibility with how you put things together, rather than locked (pun not intended) into how FCU puts your Jeep together.
This is a false dichotomy. The Rubicon owner is no more locked in than a Sport owner and has just as much flexibility. Sorry, but I love pointing out flawed logic. I'm replacing my wheels, tires and bumpers too! All covered on the locking axles, etc. though, thanks.
 
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jeff72034

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Hi jeff72034.

I find myself in a similar position deciding between these two. I too am admittedly a Jeep noob. Any chance you can share the posts you refer to above? I'd love to see real numbers from people with actual experience instead of me trying to run numbers that may not be realistic.

Cheers and thanks!
https://www.jlwranglerforums.com/forum/threads/going-with-the-2dr-sport-s-instead-of-rubicon.2799/

Hope that link works. The day I posted my topic I tried searching for the topic and didn't find what I was looking for. But, as soon as I typed it up and posted it theere were "Similar Threads" at the bottom of the page. I don't remember if THAT ONE in particular was the one but I did read all the way through a couple of the threads and found that there are lots of way of looking at the numbers. Seems like no two people ever agree on what counts and what doesn't but when I see people taking the wheels, suspension, gearing, axles, bumpers, rock guards, etc. etc. off of the Rubicon I'm left wondering what is left of the Rubicon that still makes it a Rubicon.

I had hoped that I would be able ti digest all of this info rather quickly and simply so that I could just make a list of what I would change/keep and then simply run the numbers to make a decision but, after watching hours of videos and reading several threads I think the best thing for someone as inexperienced as me is to buy the Rubicon and go offroading. I think the one thing most everyone can agree on is that the Rubicon can be driven of the back of the lot and into the woods without needing any modifications.
 

FrankieFJL

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I think the one thing most everyone can agree on is that the Rubicon can be driven of the back of the lot and into the woods without needing any modifications.
Not to further confuse you, but I think the same can be said of the Sport also. In your case, the Rubicon may be a waste of money because being a self-described noob, you may never take full advantage of what it has to offer.

OTOH The same can be said as it is with musical instruments, you should buy the best you can afford. It makes it a lot easier to play and you get more enjoyment out of it.
 
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jeff72034

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Well, I am a "noob" to Jeeps entirely. I'm also a noob to considering upgrades. But, I'm not secessarily a noob to offroading. I did once had a 1985 K5 Blazer (previous owner upgraded it) that I took through very deep muds, rocky trails, steep cliffs, and even dirt ramps. I was 18 at the time and didn't know about mortality and insurance premiums but one thing that cannot be said of me is that I did not take my offroader to its fullest potential...which would be rolling it down a 45 degree hill. LOL...It's been a hot minute since I was 18. I'm 42 now and not as invincable as I once was. So yeah, it's still possible that I'll take it out like I did my Harley that I bought back in 2011 and just decide that it's no longer my cup of tea anymore.

I did rent a JKU Sport a few weeks ago and took it to the park. Nothing too crazy. It felt so light and stiff and fragile. When I look at the raised fat tired customs that people post on youtube I can tell that these are entirely different beasts. I think, for offroading to be fun, it will require better components. I'm not trying to knock the Sport guys in any way here. Opposite. When I look at the Sport I see a build your own template as apposed to the Rubicon, which looks like a predetermined "supreme" or "deluxe" that someone like me, with no knowledge, can just hop right into and take offroad.
 

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Just drive each model and see which one meets YOUR EXPECTATIONS, at your price point. That’s all your vehicle has to do.
 

crystalbackJL

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My previous Jeep was a 2003 Wrangler X.
Only upgrades were larger 265/75/16 BFG Mud Terrains, 2"BB, shocks, and a Detroit locker up front with the stock Dana 30. Gears were 3.73 from factory.

It went everywhere my buddies 2006 Rubicon LJ would go. It was on 35's with a 3" lift.

I'm pretty sure the Rubi could go places that my budget X couldn't . However, it did everything I expected of it and more!!!!

Just purchased a 2018 Wrangler LJ Sport. Going with the same concept. Keep it simple and cheap.

Paid almost $5,000 under MSRP. That's a lot of money to pay for goodies :)
 

FrankieFJL

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My previous Jeep was a 2003 Wrangler X.
Only upgrades were larger 265/75/16 BFG Mud Terrains, 2"BB, shocks, and a Detroit locker up front with the stock Dana 30. Gears were 3.73 from factory.

It went everywhere my buddies 2006 Rubicon LJ would go. It was on 35's with a 3" lift.

I'm pretty sure the Rubi could go places that my budget X couldn't . However, it did everything I expected of it and more!!!!

Just purchased a 2018 Wrangler LJ Sport. Going with the same concept. Keep it simple and cheap.

Paid almost $5,000 under MSRP. That's a lot of money to pay for goodies :)
Agreed, and I think it needs to be stated that with these vehicles the most limiting factor is usually not the Wrangler, but the driver's experience and his or her ability. Many an experienced driver can do more with less than an inexperienced driver can do with a more capable vehicle. If that makes sense.
 

SteadyC

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This is a false dichotomy. The Rubicon owner is no more locked in than a Sport owner and has just as much flexibility. Sorry, but I love pointing out flawed logic. I'm replacing my wheels, tires and bumpers too! All covered on the locking axles, etc. though, thanks.
Actually it’s not. I wasn’t talking wheels and tires, that’s a very elementary example you choose, just about everyone does wheels and tires. You are locked into electronic lockers though, and moving to a compressor system doesn’t make sense to a Rubi owner, but makes total sense for everyone else. Hopefully you’re better at finding your own logic issues.
 
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FrankieFJL

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Actually it’s not. I wasn’t talking wheels and tires, that’s a very elementary example you choose, just about everyone does wheels and tires. You are locked into electronic lockers though, and moving to a compressor system doesn’t make sense to a Rubi owner, but makes total sense for everyone else. Hopefully you’re better at finding your own logic issues.
This was just a response to what you posted. Reread the statement I quoted. We are no more locked in nor inflexible. I stand behind my statement, sorry if your ego is bruised.

Oh, I guess here is where you weren't talking wheels and tires, sorry if I comprehended what you wrote.
I absolutely love my custom bumper, winch, light bar, inner vented fenders, wheels and tires, dual exhaust, rock rails, and more.
 

SteadyC

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This was just a response to what you posted. Reread the statement I quoted. We are no more locked in nor inflexible. I stand behind my statement, sorry if your ego is bruised.

Oh, I guess here is where you weren't talking wheels and tires, sorry if I comprehended what you wrote.
If this is how you use the internet, critiquing others, trying to make yourself feel better about yourself, rather than adding valuable insight, good luck to you. Don’t bother replying, I won’t read what elementary commentary you have to offer next.
 

FrankieFJL

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If this is how you use the internet, critiquing others, trying to make yourself feel better about yourself, rather than adding valuable insight, good luck to you. Don’t bother replying, I won’t read what elementary commentary you have to offer next.
I believe you’ve made my point.
 

Wanderingwheelz

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Well, I am a "noob" to Jeeps entirely. I'm also a noob to considering upgrades. But, I'm not secessarily a noob to offroading. I did once had a 1985 K5 Blazer (previous owner upgraded it) that I took through very deep muds, rocky trails, steep cliffs, and even dirt ramps. I was 18 at the time and didn't know about mortality and insurance premiums but one thing that cannot be said of me is that I did not take my offroader to its fullest potential...which would be rolling it down a 45 degree hill. LOL...It's been a hot minute since I was 18. I'm 42 now and not as invincable as I once was. So yeah, it's still possible that I'll take it out like I did my Harley that I bought back in 2011 and just decide that it's no longer my cup of tea anymore.

I did rent a JKU Sport a few weeks ago and took it to the park. Nothing too crazy. It felt so light and stiff and fragile. When I look at the raised fat tired customs that people post on youtube I can tell that these are entirely different beasts. I think, for offroading to be fun, it will require better components. I'm not trying to knock the Sport guys in any way here. Opposite. When I look at the Sport I see a build your own template as apposed to the Rubicon, which looks like a predetermined "supreme" or "deluxe" that someone like me, with no knowledge, can just hop right into and take offroad.
You lost me at fragile. Sorry. But a Wrangler, any Wrangler, feeling fragile is a problem with the driver, not the vehicle.
 

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Why are people paying an extra $10K for the Rubicon when they are turning right around and replacing the wheels, tires, suspenstion, gears, etc.? It's not a snarky rhetorical question...even though it sounds that was when I read it. I'm new to the Jeep concept and I'm wanting to know how to plan the right Jeep purchase for the right build. I don't know enough about the Wrangler to understand what benefits are left on the Rubicon after upgrading basically everything beneath the frame. Does it not make more sense to buy the cheaper model if you are planning a build anyway?
I bought a Rubicon because the stickers are pretty!
 

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