Why 17” wheels and not 18 or 20”?

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kapk22

kapk22

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Harrybeerbelly

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When I first got my new JL with 20s I planned on changing them. Now they are growing on me. Im now thinking I will keep them and install some good tires.
 

blnewt

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Another thing to keep in mind is the overall tire & wheel selection available, and the price differences.
17s, at least in the Jeep 5x5 bolt pattern, have many more wheel options available vs. 18s & 20s.

Also the tire selection is greater and for whatever reason, the tires are almost always cheaper w/ 17s.
 

Varilux

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kapk22 said:
I had 20” wheels on my 2018 F150 and 35x12.50 mud grapplers. It looked pretty good. But I did not take it off road as much as I will with the new Jeep. I also have the 1990 YJ that I typically use for playing, so I can beat it up.
Just a note on the tires, I went with the Ridge Grapplers (was thinking of going with the Mud Grapplers, but got talked into these instead). I really like the tread pattern- does well in the mud, but also provides a nice ride on the highway- and supposedly if you rotate them regularly these will last a long time. Also, I see you have a Rubicon, and- at least in my experience- you don't need to do very much modification to the suspension to run the 37x12.5 Ridge Grapplers. Also, keeping the rim width reasonable, you have some "bulge" to the sidewall that protects the rim from rocks (and- during daily driving- curbs)...
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Daywalker78

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I love when people say that anything less than a 40" tire onna 20" wheel is too little sidewall when people O/R stock Jeeps running 17s/18s on 33s all the time...:LOL:
 

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There are more aggressive tires becoming available in the 18" wheel with lower load ratings. I'd guess it has to do with more SUVs coming with 18" standard. When I started shopping tires for my Grand there wasn't much. Falken dropped a bunch of new sizes last year, and it seemed like Goodyear and BFG were starting to follow suit (again for 18" wheels).

As others have said, unless your Jeep is very heavily built, the E load tires are a little stiff for comfort.
 

Sand Flea

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I’ve noticed a vast majority of lifted JLs with 35s and even 37s are mounted inside 17” wheels.

is there a reason for this? What are the negatives in running 18s or 20s?

I personally like the looks of 20” wheels with 37” tires.
more sidewall = more tire flex
It isn’t about looks.
 

YerMaun

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This comes up all the time. It entirely depends what you want to do with your Jeep. I run 20" wheels with Ridge Grapplers and it is 100% fine for what I do, which is mainly road driving and the odd trail. Looks good (to me, which is all that matters), feels good. If I was going to do serious offroading, I would not have chosen this setup - for the reasons described above.
 

VKSheridan

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I‘m no expert but I hear it’s real hard to air down 20’s and get much bulge unless it’s a Buick.
 

Mr. Curti

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My theory is eventually 18’s & 20’s will be more common in the future. At one point it was 15’s, and 16’s never really took off, but 17’s became huge. Now look at the different manufacturers... 18’s and 20’s are the new normal. Give it time, as aftermarket support increases, and you will see more 18’s & 20’s on off road rigs.

Now when it comes to tires, they too will even get bigger. From 30’s in the past to 35’s in the present, manufacturers are pushing to provide, in many ways, what consumers want. So when 35’s & 37’s are the new factory normal, what are people in the Jeep community going to do? Simple... go bigger. Next thing you know 40’s & 42’s will be more common.

So if you take a 35 on a 17” wheel or a 37 on a 17” wheel, it roughly translates to a 38 or a 40 on a 20” wheel. You are still getting adequate sidewall in relation to the tire diameter and will have a bigger tire for more ground clearance.

Again this a theory of mine. Some will see it and most will disagree with it. Either way, I can not wait to see if it comes true.
 

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As it pertains to Jeep size wheels and tires, the larger the wheel diameter, the less sidewall you will have.

Tires (and the amount of sidewall) directly affect ride and handling. With a taller sidewall area, the tire can flex more, providing a better ride. With a shorter sidewall, the flexing of the sidewall is reduced, leading to a more firm ride, but better handling.

Larger diameter wheels and shorter sidewalls are great for sports cars where cornering speed is important. Off road, the shorter sidewalls won't bulge as much when you air down, which can reduce your tread footprint and leave the wheel edges more vulnerable to damage. Short sidewalls will also tend to give the Jeep a rougher ride (on and off road).

I personally don't like the looks of 20" wheels with tires less than 40" on a Wrangler. My primary concerns for tires and wheels are function and ability way before looks. But I also take mine off road. Those who don't and care more for looks might appreciate the 20" wheels.

In addition, the larger the wheel diameter, the more the wheel (and tires) will weigh. This is an important consideration when doing a build, especially if you're not re-gearing, in order to keep down the un-sprung weight.
As a newbie - I came here this morning hoping I'd find exactly this info - perfect, thanks!
 

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As a newbie - I came here this morning hoping I'd find exactly this info - perfect, thanks!
You're welcome! Plenty of great info on this forum. Good luck with whatever your build plans are. Most importantly, get out there and enjoy your Jeep!
 

Vinny1

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Be careful asking questions like that. I think some peoples heads explode if you have anything other than 17s :crying:
 
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