What is your ideal wrangler powerplant?

What would you buy? All have 500 hp / 500 ft lb torque...


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Kurt0

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The 4.0 straight 6.
id love for someone to release a 4.0+ stroker kit for these things. it would be f’ing money.





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dski

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I see everyone chiming in with desires for more torque, more power... etc.
But the OP leveled that playing field. Given: all motors would have 500hp, 500ft/lbs torque.

So what are the other considerations?
- Initial cost
- Fuel efficiency
- Simplicity of design / ease of maintenance
- Cost of repair
- Reliability / longevity
- Torque availability (e.g. for elec motor)



If you are ignoring cost, maintenance, etc. (boring old stuff) and just looking for power and performance, the torque curve of the electric is the only difference and would be the motor of choice.

Of course, you can't ignore those other things, and in real life, the NA-V8 would be the most sensible choice. Simple, reliable, old school, easier to repair, etc.

Yeah, the idea was to indeed level the playing field. I think what this poll does show is how we love the sound and idea of certain engines based on what we grew up 'wanting.'

I wish the 4xe had an onboard generator. I don't care what the pure electric range is if I can fill up at the gas station. If I can get 400 miles per tank instead of 250 (in my jk) and have tons of power and instant torque, I'd buy it. Sure, I'd regret the insurance and replacement side of it.
 

Hound Dog

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I think adapting it to a JL would be quite the challenge.
 

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Stroker kits exist for the 4.0L from the YJ/TJ era but not he Pentastar 3.6L. It's actually a fairly complicated thing to ask of a short stroke motor like the 3.6 as it would likely require raising the deck height to accommodate more piston travel. With that said, it's unlikely we'll ever see one.
 

Kurt0

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Stroker kits exist for the 4.0L from the YJ/TJ era but not he Pentastar 3.6L. It's actually a fairly complicated thing to ask of a short stroke motor like the 3.6 as it would likely require raising the deck height to accommodate more piston travel. With that said, it's unlikely we'll ever see one.
this is correct and problematic. The lack of deck height means the connecting rod deflection angle would get tough; although spreading out .4L on 6cyl might not be un doable. Itll just never happen. They took a more performance oriented car v6 and put it in a truck.

the problem with V8 swaps is the price shops charge to do it.

i think our best opportunity at more low end is banding together and having a set of camshafts made that shifts the tq curve left so we can better overcome the transmission‘s overdrive. We’d have to see if we could even run sufficient lift and ramp speed to effectively cut duration and shift tq left. It would be a big undertaking and not sure worth the hassle.

Ill probably just end up going supercharged.
 
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dski

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this is correct and problematic. The lack of deck height means the connecting rod deflection angle would get tough; although spreading out .4L on 6cyl might not be un doable. Itll just never happen. They took a more performance oriented car v6 and put it in a truck.

the problem with V8 swaps is the price shops charge to do it.

i think our best opportunity at more low end is banding together and having a set of camshafts made that shifts the tq curve left so we can better overcome the transmission‘s overdrive. We’d have to see if we could even run sufficient lift and ramp speed to effectively cut duration and shift tq left. It would be a big undertaking and not sure worth the hassle.

Ill probably just end up going supercharged.

I'm convinced you're a mechanical engineer or a true gear head. Either way, you have way more knowledge on this than i do! Wow.
 

Kurt0

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I'm convinced you're a mechanical engineer or a true gear head. Either way, you have way more knowledge on this than i do! Wow.
hahaha. Thanks man. Appreciate it...several years of asking lots of questions.
 
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MeanMrWolf

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If I had used a Tazer or other programmer FCA would have blamed all my electrical faults on it and would not be “buying” 2020 JLUR back.

Point is ESS (and eTorque) is just another needless electrical system to have issues and reduce reliability over time. It should be an option not to have it at all or to have it turned off by the dealer. The fact that they can turn it off but won’t is BS.
ESS is why we can have a Wrangler. With out it, expect to pay a hefty extra because the CAFE penalties would grow. Stellantis has a huge carbon footprint that it needs to deal with.
 

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Not sure how many people on here are familiar with or recall the JK Project Rattletrap. That powerplant... the 12V Cummins. That would be my dream.
Yes, pre 1998 versions. But its not just the motor that went south with the emissions, but also the ultra low sulfur fuel. The sulfur provided the lubricity and cooling that was a very large part of a diesels reputation for longevity. The modern fuel is now very dry, like kerosene, and the high pressure side of the injection system doesn't last nearly as long.

I was born and raised into the heavy equipment and truck repair industry. Over 30 years in it and I've seen countless vehicles get diesel transplants. Mostly the coveted 4BT and 6BT motors, salvaged out of pickups and old Grumman step vans.

After what's been done to the fuel and the motors nowadays, I wouldn't want to be married to a diesel motor in my own vehicle. Most of the clamor towards the diesel, that I read on this forum, is people chasing an aged out fad and are unaware of it.
 

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I think the current V6 works well for my use.
 

Whiskey 13

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I had three different 4.0 I6 and I wish they were still offered. I like my 2.0 4T but my inline 4.0 engines were just plain everyday tough.
 

ErAcEr

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Supercharged V6 for the win. Simple, Light, Powerful. Linear power delivery.
The Hemi is fun and all but it is old ass tech and it is heavy.
Amen!
 

Kurt0

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Yes, pre 1998 versions. But its not just the motor that went south with the emissions, but also the ultra low sulfur fuel. The sulfur provided the lubricity and cooling that was a very large part of a diesels reputation for longevity. The modern fuel is now very dry, like kerosene, and the high pressure side of the injection system doesn't last nearly as long.

I was born and raised into the heavy equipment and truck repair industry. Over 30 years in it and I've seen countless vehicles get diesel transplants. Mostly the coveted 4BT and 6BT motors, salvaged out of pickups and old Grumman step vans.

After what's been done to the fuel and the motors nowadays, I wouldn't want to be married to a diesel motor in my own vehicle. Most of the clamor towards the diesel, that I read on this forum, is people chasing an aged out fad and are unaware of it.
there is some truth to this; but i think what people want (or at least what i like) about diesel is high torque at low load and long tank range. You cant replicated the combination of all those things with a gas motor....once you need a gas motor to make torque, your fuel mileage plummets especially if loaded Or towing.

electrification may close this gap soon, but its not there yet.
 

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