what causes an active regen to stop prematurely?

Seals881

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The temperature required to burn off any particles is no longer met. So the regen stops. It takes 20+ mins at highway speeds to do a full regen. I used to take my older diesels out on the highways on purpose to clear them up. And the one time I didn’t care to do it much was in the winter and found my self with a vehicle that wouldn’t start due to it being full of crud not getting burned off with a regen.





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Compression-Ignition

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The temperature required to burn off any particles is no longer met. So the regen stops. It takes 20+ mins at highway speeds to do a full regen. I used to take my older diesels out on the highways on purpose to clear them up. And the one time I didn’t care to do it much was in the winter and found my self with a vehicle that wouldn’t start due to it being full of crud not getting burned off with a regen.
These do them quicker than that. I would guess most average closer to 15 minutes with their 3.0L diesels. Mine does them in about 8 minutes due to the FBC.
 

Geos7812

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For those of you using ScanGauges and can tell the soot percentage, how quickly is the DPF filling up? My wife drives our JL and has a 10 minute commute, I want the diesel real bad, but am thinking her commute will mess with the DPF too badly. I get the highway speed thing, I have a diesel pickup, but wondering how often I would need to “blow it out” to keep from messing it up.
 

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For those of you using ScanGauges and can tell the soot percentage, how quickly is the DPF filling up? My wife drives our JL and has a 10 minute commute, I want the diesel real bad, but am thinking her commute will mess with the DPF too badly. I get the highway speed thing, I have a diesel pickup, but wondering how often I would need to “blow it out” to keep from messing it up.
Soot % climbs up pretty fast when driving in city traffic and in stop/go situations. On a 10 mile commute on the streets, it can climb up by 10%. On the highway, with 600F DPF temps, passive regen slowly occurs but the rate of passive regen reducing the soot on the highway is much much slower than the soot climbing up when driving the same amount of miles on the streets.

But it is not a big deal if you are monitoring it. Once it reaches 80% soot, it does an active regen and it takes about 8-10 minutes to complete and that brings it down to 8-10%. Try not to interrupt the active regen but again, not a big deal if you do it. If the regen is interrupted halfway, you will probably see soot level at less than 50%, and it will start the active regen once again when the soot builds up to 80%.

In my observation and a couple of others who mostly drive on the highway, we have seen that active regen also occurs once every 800 miles or so from the previous regen even if the soot level is at 50%. So active regen occurs either at 80% soot in the DPF or every 800 miles (approx.) whichever comes first.
 

Compression-Ignition

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For those of you using ScanGauges and can tell the soot percentage, how quickly is the DPF filling up? My wife drives our JL and has a 10 minute commute, I want the diesel real bad, but am thinking her commute will mess with the DPF too badly. I get the highway speed thing, I have a diesel pickup, but wondering how often I would need to “blow it out” to keep from messing it up.
What are the speeds she drives to and from work?

It takes my wife 12-15 minutes to get to work. Speeds 25-35 mph. On occasion a regen can perfectly fit into the drive and be completed. But often she has to 'go drive around'.

If you have a monitor it isn't that big of a deal. IIRC her Jeep goes into regen about every 250 miles. Usually every 2-3 weeks.

As far as messing it up, I don't think anyone knows what that looks like on one of these 3.0L Wranglers. Us short trippers are just speculating how things might go wrong.

My wife is in the habit of glancing at the soot percent daily. When it gets to 70% she tells me. Then when it gets to about 75-76 I'll go waste some fuel and drive her Jeep so she doesn't have to worry about it. Gives me an excuse to drive her rig.

Occasionally she has to shut it off during a regen. No issues as of yet. I would rather not make a habit of it though.

My opinion, if you are a diesel guy, and you want the diesel get the diesel. Nothing else will suffice.
 

Geos7812

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Soot % climbs up pretty fast when driving in city traffic and in stop/go situations. On a 10 mile commute on the streets, it can climb up by 10%. On the highway, with 600F DPF temps, passive regen slowly occurs but the rate of passive regen reducing the soot on the highway is much much slower than the soot climbing up when driving the same amount of miles on the streets.

But it is not a big deal if you are monitoring it. Once it reaches 80% soot, it does an active regen and it takes about 8-10 minutes to complete and that brings it down to 8-10%. Try not to interrupt the active regen but again, not a big deal if you do it. If the regen is interrupted halfway, you will probably see soot level at less than 50%, and it will start the active regen once again when the soot builds up to 80%.

In my observation and a couple of others who mostly drive on the highway, we have seen that active regen also occurs once every 800 miles or so from the previous regen even if the soot level is at 50%. So active regen occurs either at 80% soot in the DPF or every 800 miles (approx.) whichever comes first.
Great info! Thanks a lot.
 

Geos7812

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What are the speeds she drives to and from work?

It takes my wife 12-15 minutes to get to work. Speeds 25-35 mph. On occasion a regen can perfectly fit into the drive and be completed. But often she has to 'go drive around'.

If you have a monitor it isn't that big of a deal. IIRC her Jeep goes into regen about every 250 miles. Usually every 2-3 weeks.

As far as messing it up, I don't think anyone knows what that looks like on one of these 3.0L Wranglers. Us short trippers are just speculating how things might go wrong.

My wife is in the habit of glancing at the soot percent daily. When it gets to 70% she tells me. Then when it gets to about 75-76 I'll go waste some fuel and drive her Jeep so she doesn't have to worry about it. Gives me an excuse to drive her rig.

Occasionally she has to shut it off during a regen. No issues as of yet. I would rather not make a habit of it though.

My opinion, if you are a diesel guy, and you want the diesel get the diesel. Nothing else will suffice.
She drives 5 miles and 13 minutes. I am thinking the diesel DPF may be an issue. I hate that. I want the diesel.
 
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She drives 5 miles and 13 minutes. I am thinking the diesel DPF may be an issue. I hate that. I want the diesel.
Mine regens about once per tankful, but I'm an almost exclusively short-hop guy. I figure the system is engineered to handle all kinds of driving (this is not splitting the atom). BTW, last week I had three occasions to cruise at 75mph for 20 miles+ and I saw no appreciable drop in soot. I figure a computer is watching out for me and I don't worry about it.

Get the diesel and don't look back.

Truthfully, the most annoying nuance of the EcoDiesel is not soot; it's having to waiting a minute or two for the turbo temperature to drop before shutting off the engine. I know...I'm nit-picking.
 
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Compression-Ignition

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She drives 5 miles and 13 minutes. I am thinking the diesel DPF may be an issue. I hate that. I want the diesel.
Well, sample of 1 here but my wife does almost exactly the same. 5 miles one way same amount of time. No problems.

She has missed that the Jeep was in regen several times. No issues. I've told her on her way in to work if a regen starts she can deliberately shut if off. Again no issues.

I'd have to go look, but I think we're at about 6,500 miles and 25 regens. And I'd estimate that perhaps 5-8 of them were shut down early. No negative messages have been displayed as a result. I would note, that I don't think we have ever seen 2 early shut downs in a row. Being that she is somewhat on high alert for the next one.

I've had a few diesels, 3 of 4 were equipped with DPF's. I have to say this one seems to handle the process the best. Shortest amount of time to complete them. Takes the least hit to it's fuel economy. I personally can't smell them. I do smell the DEF fluid from time to time.

So far, knock on wood, it just works.
 

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