Water in the Trans / moving tubes

LLANERO

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The transmission breather hose is very high in the engine bay.
If water got in the transmisson through the breather, you should also have water in your T/C and diffs.
Did you check them? You could have used that as an argument that there was a leak in the transmission.
Also, you can file a claim with your insurance company.
My niece hydrolocked the engine of her Civic after a storm. The insurance paid for the engine and she was at no fault.

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Kevin Mojito

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Nice work Dario
I did not know myself that the trans vent was that high in the engine bay. I know on some Ford products that the t-case and trans connect into 1 vent. Not sure if that's the case on the JL?
OP should have water in the diffs and t-case too.
 

MandKM

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Nice work Dario
I did not know myself that the trans vent was that high in the engine bay. I know on some Ford products that the t-case and trans connect into 1 vent. Not sure if that's the case on the JL?
OP should have water in the diffs and t-case too.
All vents on the JL are separate. The transfer case vent is at the top the the housing and the hose is only about 3” long, while the rear differential breather is attached to the bottom of the Jeep’s rear compartment (trunk?). Both are below the stated 30” max fording depth, but are equipped with membranes to prevent water intrusion (think Gortex). As a matter of fact, the breathers are manufactured by Gore, maker of Gortex.
 

Kevin Mojito

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That's interesting. I wonder why the trans did not get that one way type breather valve.
 

WyoTex

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interesting
 

LLANERO

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That's interesting. I wonder why the trans did not get that one way type breather valve.
All vents on the JL are separate. The transfer case vent is at the top the the housing and the hose is only about 3” long, while the rear differential breather is attached to the bottom of the Jeep’s rear compartment (trunk?). Both are below the stated 30” max fording depth, but are equipped with membranes to prevent water intrusion (think Gortex). As a matter of fact, the breathers are manufactured by Gore, maker of Gortex.
I don't trust those valves. I always raise the hoses. I need to find the one for the transfer case. Any pics?

This is what I have done so far:

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Kevin Mojito

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Looks good.
I see on the factory ( most ) they like to have a curve. The end of the hose is pointed back down toward ground. Do you know why they do that?
My basic idea, water does not drip down on an open tube pointing up. I'm sure it's more to it then that.
 

MandKM

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@LLANERO here are a couple photos showing the vent on the transfer case. The first shows where on top of the transfer case it is located. The second shows it from below. Good luck. It is very difficult to reach.
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LLANERO

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@LLANERO here are a couple photos showing the vent on the transfer case. The first shows where on top of the transfer case it is located. The second shows it from below. Good luck. It is very difficult to reach.
4281FC1E-266E-47B8-BD09-2391E6150A63.jpeg
320AA452-CCCE-466F-8D36-06EFF3DCB971.jpeg
I'll try to reach it on the weekend. Thanks!
 

cjaama

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Also, you can file a claim with your insurance company.
My niece hydrolocked the engine of her Civic after a storm. The insurance paid for the engine and she was at no fault.
Seriously. Try this.
When I handled claims, I handled a handful from people driving through deep water and hydrolocking and paid out on them. Now, these occurred on the road, however it shouldn't really change anything.
You incurred a loss caused by a sudden and unforeseen occurrence. You did not intentionally cause harm to your vehicle. Most policies have exclusions for racing or performing in a competition, but no exclusions for off-roading (refer to the guy who ran over the woman at Moab).
Unfortunately you'd be making the claim after repairs were made, which they won't like, but as long as the dealership has everything documented I think there's a strong chance of it going through. It doesn't hurt to try. Just be honest about everything.
If your insurance company feels it should have been warrantied they'll go after FCA to reimburse them after the fact.
 

PyrPatriot

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When I handled claims, I handled a handful from people driving through deep water and hydrolocking and paid out on them. Now, these occurred on the road, however it shouldn't really change anything.
You incurred a loss caused by a sudden and unforeseen occurrence. You did not intentionally cause harm to your vehicle. Most policies have exclusions for racing or performing in a competition, but no exclusions for off-roading (refer to the guy who ran over the woman at Moab).
State specific. States with places like MOAB probably require auto insurance companies to cover off roading. States like KY definitely do not. Insurance companies here only cover occurrences that happen on the road. Yes, road. They are not contractually obligated to cover damage to your vehicle in your driveway or on a highway shoulder. Though they do and will. However, at an off-road park or on private land: nope. All the trails I ride are technically still county roads, though they look like little more than ruts, dips, and creek crossings. Still, Geico here in KY said they'd cover it. So, check with your insurance contract. Don't just ask them, read your entire agreement. Geico tried bringing in "internal references" to b.s. like not covering my vehicle if it had a lift, larger tires, etc but because they wouldn't give me those documents, include them as an adendum/appendix to my signed policy, they can't enforce it against me. Your state might have different standards.

But just in case because of threads like this, I will now be keeping differential oil, motor oil, filters, and other "emergency" supplies in the Jeep in a box while off roading. Someone on youtube sank their Jeep and ended up having to flush the engine oil out ALOT, but the Jeep ran. So I'll be looking into that as the worst case scenario before having to call insurance.
 

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