Billy

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Death wobble isn't a steering. Asked problem in my experience. Atleast not the column. It's cvs and or other connections.
Wasn't referring to the column, but rather the steering box, linkages and geometry as it relates. Whatever the changes are, here's hoping the death wobble dies a final death.
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The Great Grape Ape

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If you have a 36" inseam -and you're 6'5"- and you've tried fitting in more than a few cars only to realize you don't fit in most -comfortably- you "get it". Otherwise, you can't appreciate "the struggle";)
I'm close, 3" off on both, and with a previously broken hip from hockey and a knee injury from Ski Racing, so I understand the struggle.
However, why is anyone else financing it? I pay extra for things I want, like legroom on a flight, why shouldn't the small minority of the people as tall or even taller than me? At least with legroom on a flight it's a fixed cost regardless of where you sit if the plane is empty, whereas for a vehicle each unit they add with premium parts it costs extra money, it's not a zero-sum situation. The platforms are built in such a way that suspension, etc and other required bits are the minimum requirement to add something. In XY & Z package they are built with that, therefore the entry starts at that level.

Again, FCA can make everything standard including the required components, and then the base is jacked up for the majority (yes Sport still outsells all others by a wide margin). Making it a Sahara or Rubicon standard feature and optional on others, means the majority don't pay for something that is truly a luxury item.

Either that, or because people moan about paying for premium features (like power windows/locks or even simply a rear seat in a JK).

PS, if you go into a dealer you can probably build one even on a Sport, like our Sport comes with manual locks/doors, but has EVIC, 430 and other features only offered on models with upgraded features. Visit your dealer and see if it can't be added, if it's not due to something like suspension, then it likely can still be done, just not via configurator.

At least they are offering it now for you as an option, whereas still no factory Hemi option for me even as a premium, only after market options for the price of a base JK.
 

Aaron

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I'm close, 3" off on both, and with a previously broken hip from hockey and a knee injury from Ski Racing, so I understand the struggle.
However, why is anyone else financing it? I pay extra for things I want, like legroom on a flight, why shouldn't the small minority of the people as tall or even taller than me? At least with legroom on a flight it's a fixed cost regardless of where you sit if the plane is empty, whereas for a vehicle each unit they add with premium parts it costs extra money, it's not a zero-sum situation. The platforms are built in such a way that suspension, etc and other required bits are the minimum requirement to add something. In XY & Z package they are built with that, therefore the entry starts at that level.

Again, FCA can make everything standard including the required components, and then the base is jacked up for the majority (yes Sport still outsells all others by a wide margin). Making it a Sahara or Rubicon standard feature and optional on others, means the majority don't pay for something that is truly a luxury item.

Either that, or because people moan about paying for premium features (like power windows/locks or even simply a rear seat in a JK).

PS, if you go into a dealer you can probably build one even on a Sport, like our Sport comes with manual locks/doors, but has EVIC, 430 and other features only offered on models with upgraded features. Visit your dealer and see if it can't be added, if it's not due to something like suspension, then it likely can still be done, just not via configurator.

At least they are offering it now for you as an option, whereas still no factory Hemi option for me even as a premium, only after market options for the price of a base JK.
I think the main issue is whether or not it's an option on the sport. I totally understand paying more (and I personally would be happy to do so and truly appreciate this addition). The problem is if they don't allow it as an option on the sport to force people to buy a higher trim to get it. Good point about possibly being able to do it through the dealer though. I'll be looking into that if it's not available online. This is definitely a welcome addition to the wrangler lineup!
 

Rockmaninoff

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If you have a 36" inseam -and you're 6'5"- and you've tried fitting in more than a few cars only to realize you don't fit in most -comfortably- you "get it". Otherwise, you can't appreciate "the struggle";)
I'm close, 3" off on both, and with a previously broken hip from hockey and a knee injury from Ski Racing, so I understand the struggle.
I just have a big member and I can appreciate a steering column that can be moved so my wife won't need to struggle ;)

I bet the real reason behind adding the adjustable steering column and the lighter steering is to make the JL a lot more like an everyday SUV so that it appeals to everyone in the household and not just the Jeep-head mom/dad/child of the family. Even a massive Infinity QX80/Nissan Patrol Y62 has much lighter steering and anyone can do a 3 point turn with just the pinky finger on the wheel. I personally prefer a vehicle I can feel when I'm turning but the light steering becomes a massive advantage when you're changing lanes a lot in traffic like you have to do in congested cities or... in shopping mall parking lots.

As for how electro-hydraulic steering affects different wheels... I expect a lot more things to fail a lot more quickly when people put those fat 37s, etc. Hopefully there's a wire we can cut or better yet, a fuse that we can pull to bypass things. Jeepers will find a way.
 

The Great Grape Ape

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I just have a big member and I can appreciate a steering column that can be moved so my wife won't need to struggle ;)
:dance: :fist bump:

I personally prefer a vehicle I can feel when I'm turning but the light steering becomes a massive advantage when you're changing lanes a lot in traffic like you have to do in congested cities or... in shopping mall parking lots.
Yeah, definitely advantages and drawbacks. I too like feel connected to the wheels even if some people think it's sloppy I personally get more feedback from the wheel than in our Grand Cherokee, or my dad's Cherokee or my Father in law's Mercedes.

It is interesting though having the JK and JKU side by side though, the turning radius is hilariously different, as proven by an incident yesterday where we missed the entrance to the dealership and while we could just turn around in a circle in the JK to go to the other entrance, I had to 2-point the turn. I doubt it can affect turning radius, as it's essentially currently lock to lock anyways, but if it could get me an extra degree or two of arc that would be greatly appreciated.

As for how electro-hydraulic steering affects different wheels... I expect a lot more things to fail a lot more quickly when people put those fat 37s, etc. Hopefully there's a wire we can cut or better yet, a fuse that we can pull to bypass things. Jeepers will find a way.
Yep, pretty much. I always prefer the 'multi-step-disable-dance' method vs fuse pull, but... if we must... then 'So be it!' sayeth the flock. :jk:
 

four low

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seanwnost: 6151 said:
I'll take whatever is simplest and easiest to work on, when it fails!
This will be neither simple or easy to repair . This system, plus the ESS , is "steering" me towards buying a 2018 JK.
The added complexity and expense of repair is undermining what the Wrangler represents.
 

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I was reading up on the EHPS systems on other jeeps and came across this;

WITH EHPS
CAUTION: There is an Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering (EHPS) pump on some vehicles requiring a different fluid. Do not mix power steering fluid types. Damage may result to the power steering pump and system if any other fluid is used. The mechanical power steering pump systems on this vehicle require the use of Power Steering Fluid +4, which meets material specification MS-9602 or equivalent. The EHPS system uses fluid which meets material specification MS-11655 or equivalent. Do not overfill.

The EHPS system consists of:

Steering column and Intermediate Shaft
Rack and pinion steering gear
EHPS pump (3.6L) (3)
Pump pressure (5) and supply/return line assembly (1, 2)
Remote power steering reservoir (The EHPS reservoir has only one hose connection)
Some early built vehicles with EHPS do not have a power steering system cooler effecting the power steeringline/hose configuration.
Power assist is provided by the EHPS pump (3) mounted to the cradle in front of the engine. The EHPS pump is an electrically operated hydraulic pump which supplies variable hydraulic fluid flow and pressure to the steering gear. The EHPS pump replaces the conventional belted power steering pump. The EHPS pump has an EHPS module attached (not replaceable separately). There are two electrical connectors (6) on the EHPS pump assembly (3). One connector is a 12 volt low amperage module connector, and the other is a 12V higher amperage pump connector containing a larger gauge wire for motor operation. The power steering hoses and steering gear are substantially unchanged in function from a conventional system. However, there are unique components for this system, such as hoses for routing and the gear for valve tuning.


WITH EHPS
CAUTION: There is an Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering (EHPS) pump on some vehicles requiring a different fluid. Do not mix power steering fluid types. Damage may result to the power steering pump and system if any other fluid is used. The mechanical power steering pump systems on this vehicle require the use of Power Steering Fluid +4, which meets material specification MS-9602 or equivalent. The EHPS system uses fluid which meets material specification MS-11655 or equivalent. Do not overfill.

Multiple modules work together to improve vehicle steering assist at different rates at different speeds. At slow speeds (parking maneuvers) more assist is available and at high speeds less assist is available. The EHPS module uses the CAN - C data bus for inputs and outputs of the information necessary for operation. The use of a scan tool is necessary for diagnostics. EHPS module faults are stored in a diagnostic program memory and are accessible with the scan tool. Faults remain in memory until cleared, or until after the vehicle is started approximately 50 times. Stored faults are not erased if the battery is disconnected. For descriptions and procedures related to DTCs (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering(EHPS) - Diagnosis and Testing).The Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering (EHPS) Pump assembly contains a control module, brushless electric motor, and hydraulic pump integrated into a single unit. The EHPS Pump draws power from the 12 volt electrical system and provides the necessary flow and pressure to the steeringgear to provide normal power steering. The output flow of the EHPS Pump is varied as a function of SteeringWheel Rate (received from SAS) and Vehicle Speed (received from ABS Module) in order to provide the optimum flow of power steering fluid to the steering gear under all operating conditions. The EHPS Pump will start to provide steering assist when the Vehicle speed message greater than 5 km/h (3 mph) is received on CAN C. If the Vehicle Speed message is missing at vehicle startup, the EHPS Pump will not operate. If the Vehicle Speed message is lost during operation the EHPS pump will use a default vehicle speed of 85 km/h (59 mph) to calculate desired flow and as a result, steering effort will no longer be speed sensitive. If the SteeringWheel Position message is lost the EHPS Pump will use a default steering wheel rate of 230°/sec to calculate desired flow and as a result, steering effort may be higher on evasive steering maneuvers. The EHPS pump will resume normal operation automatically once any missing message or out of range condition noted above is restored to normal.
 

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Oh please please please tell me this firms up the steering. One of my biggest gripes about my JKU is the fact it has so much play in the steering. There are countless other threads on the Wrangler forums complaining about this as well.
If the steering is improved, it'll be a JL for me!
 

Sport11

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Will the electric motor still use hydraulic fluid (housed in a reservoir) or are we talking pure electric motor not involving any fluids?
 

Billy

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Will the electric motor still use hydraulic fluid (housed in a reservoir) or are we talking pure electric motor not involving any fluids?
Dude. Did you even read the title of this thread? Or the original post?
 

Sport11

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Dude. Did you even read the title of this thread? Or the original post?
There are electronic steering systems that use an electric motor which still relies on hydraulic fluids/hoses, and there's electronic systems that are fully electric and don't rely on those.
 

Billy

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But did you read the original post?

"Electro-Hydraulic Steering

The goal of an electro-hydraulic steering system is to combine the advantages of both hydraulic power steering and electric power steering -- natural steering feel and improved fuel efficiency."

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Gavin

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Will the electric motor still use hydraulic fluid (housed in a reservoir) or are we talking pure electric motor not involving any fluids?
See #22 above ...
 

digitalbliss

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See #22 above ...
Not even necessary, the title of the post is Verified: Electro-HYDRAULIC power steering..... Thats why he got blasted so hard, not to mention all the other info that answered his question that was already posted beforehand.
 

Billy

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