Echo4papa

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Now try this... restart trip B so it's fresh at 0... make sure your battery is full. Put the Jeep in Electric mode and drive around town for a few miles. I did this tonight on the way home from my brother's house (nephew turned 8 today). It shows all my miles on battery, none on ICE, the ICE never came on, and yet it also says I'm getting 26.7 MPG.
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michail

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This is where the manual mode (though pain in the butt) is working more efficiently for long run drives until the battery is depleted (around 80 miles). YMMV.
YMMV :LOL: 👍

I'm typically under 30 miles per day, so I don't get much opportunity to test something like this.
 

ElHobbz

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This is a game changer! Just used it this morning for a 90miles one way and it does seem more efficient! My mpg was at 26.6 and instead of diving to 22 (usual outcome) when I take this trip it increased to 27.2. Someone needs to do the actual "testing" but for the meantime I will be implementing this technique.
 

Skeethree

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It makes no sense to me. How can you drive 80 miles with none being electric powered? It almost looks like M8 activates the E-save mode. I typically see about 50-70 mpge starting out, then dropping to 24-28 mpg (for gasoline use only) after the battery hits 1%. I frequently drive the same 38 mile round trip with about 75% of those miles on the battery. I'll try the M8 setting but I have to guess that running the gasoline engine constantly can't be as efficient as only running the ICE when needed with about 10-12% of your miles still being electric only. Maybe this just tricks the mileage readout. I do know that if I start an 80 mile trip with the battery fully charged, I'll end the trip with a 30-40 mpg figure based on about 45% of those miles being electric.
 

Jeep#6

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Fantastic, Since you still want to use all of the battery this would be ideal for >80 miles or if less just switch to electric mode as you finish your trip to get use of the full charge. Can’t wait to try this.
 

michail

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I'd like to see some hard data beyond the MPGe calc. But it could be roughly 80 miles is a sweet spot for this? Then factor in slowing down, stops, etc. where ice should have been off.
 

LJ_3M121318

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Been trying it out and seems to be better mpg this way. Interested in some real depth analysis on this
 

4xeRubicon

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My 4xe in Hybrid mode only uses electric first. It does not intelligently decides between gas and electric until I floor the throttle to kick in ICE. So technically it's not a true hybrid.

Only when I put the truck in manual M8 mode do I see both ICE and electric being consumed at the same time. Full charge on electric does not run out until 80+ miles.
While it is true that the Jeep tries to use up visible battery first with no gas used unless you floor it, it is still continuously switching from gas to battery to gas & battery even after it hits <1% battery. This is in Hybrid mode with Max Regen OFF, running 2H and mostly using adaptive cruise control.

I just took a 1,400 mile drive where I started with full battery and charged two other times during the trip. This means that I had about 75 miles I should be able to go on just battery. On my trip though, I logged 175 miles on battery.

I watched the trip meter as I was going and could see that battery miles were only accruing when the gas engine was off. There were lots of times where the gas engine and battery were both contributing, but those miles all get assigned to gas. Anytime I had to slow down for traffic, or was coasting downhill, the gas engine was turning itself off and the battery was taking over.

You don't have to do anything special for the Jeep to truly run in hybrid mode. It runs as efficiently as possible, and running all battery at first is the most efficient means. After it "runs out of battery" then it blends battery and gas because it still actually has battery for that. That is the second most efficient means. If you put it in eSave, it will use less battery, but will still use it when needed. This is the least efficient means (with eSave - Battery Charging being worse than normal eSave).
 

Echo4papa

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If you have a regular commute and want to test this, please do. I'd love to, but I work from home so it's not something I can do.

@G-StarRock, it might be a bit of a pain, but worth while to test this out. Hopefully we can get others to join in too because more data will help account for differences in driving conditions, weather etc.

I would suggest driving in Hybrid Mode, recharging overnight and (if possible) limiting your driving during the week to just the commute. Log your miles. Start with a full tank and fill up at the end of the week to see exactly how much gas you used. Also, used Trip B, reset it at the start and capture what it shows at the end of the trial period. This would be the "use all the electric first then ICE" test.

The next week do the same thing, but run it in manual shifting mode that you feel gives better mpg. Same deal. Charge overnight. Try to drive the same route, same style etc. Fresh Trip B and capture it at the end of the week, how much fuel did you use etc.

Anyone else with a regular commute can do the same if they are willing. Not only would this test out your theory on which way is better, but also on the accuracy of the display in different modes as well.
 

HungryHound

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Depleting the battery first is not necessarily the most overall efficient way to run. I've logged over 5,000 miles cross-country and have found that switching into e-save for highway driving above 50mph then switching to electric for slower city driving is the most efficient. As others have alluded, the 2.0 purrs along in 8th gear on the highway, but the srart/stop driving in the city caused the engine to rev and shift at higher rpm points. By using the auto-stick option, the OP is probably keeping the rpms lower by manually changing the shift points. I suggest trying the engine at highway speeds and using electric in start/stop traffic.

On a side note, while running around Moab for 2 weeks, I found that e-save in 4-lo was the best way to run most trails since it used electric only during the slow rock crawling technical areas, but kicked in the ICE when running gravel or sand stretches in between the bigger obstacles.
 

Jocko

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Depleting the battery first is not necessarily the most overall efficient way to run. I've logged over 5,000 miles cross-country and have found that switching into e-save for highway driving above 50mph then switching to electric for slower city driving is the most efficient. As others have alluded, the 2.0 purrs along in 8th gear on the highway, but the srart/stop driving in the city caused the engine to rev and shift at higher rpm points. By using the auto-stick option, the OP is probably keeping the rpms lower by manually changing the shift points. I suggest trying the engine at highway speeds and using electric in start/stop traffic.

On a side note, while running around Moab for 2 weeks, I found that e-save in 4-lo was the best way to run most trails since it used electric only during the slow rock crawling technical areas, but kicked in the ICE when running gravel or sand stretches in between the bigger obstacles.
Nice. My brain was starting to settle around that same idea of e-save on the highway and electric around town. So it's awesome to hear someone with way more miles driven has arrived at the same conclusion!
 

HungryHound

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Nice. My brain was starting to settle around that same idea of e-save on the highway and electric around town. So it's awesome to hear someone with way more miles driven has arrived at the same conclusion!
Just turned 6,000 miles in Idaho. Gonna have a potato to celebrate. BTW.... one nice thing about poor Wrangler aerodynamics is I get just as good mpg with the windows down and top back on the highway.
 

Gorilla83

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Really interesting thread, thanks for bringing this up, OP! We've got some 'short' road trips coming up this weekend, will have to try this out for sure. I too noticed on the way home from the dealer that e-save (or perhaps shifting into manual mode?) is the most efficient for highway driving.
 

Shasta_Steve

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Curious if anyone running e-save has been checking their mileage at the pump and not just on the gauge. One of the posts on Youtube stated that they were only getting 15.9 MPG using e-save but was showing much higher on the gauge. They were much closer to the real MPG in hybrid. Still lower than actual though.

I will still have to play with this but it seems odd to me that if we are able to get better mileage with this running e-save or manual that Jeep would not of programed the thing to run that way.
 

ElHobbz

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I wish there was a 4th option like "target mpg". In this made up option you can set a target of say 35mpg for example and on normal hybrid situations where the engine shuts off the engine would charge battery until the efficiency dropped to 35mpg.

I feel like hybrid mode is a race to the bottom on the battery instead of having decent mpg
 
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