Ultimate Off Road Power Supply

TennesseePA

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I am working with a manufacturer to create what I think is the ultimate power system for overloading, camping and encompassing the entire outdoor lifestyle.

What I have envisioned is a 12V power supply similar to the ArkPak with a few major upgrades to the system. My system will come with LiFePO4 batteries preinstalled rather than bring your own. They system will have a pure sine wave inverter built in and at least two 110V outlets. Although I do not necessarily feel they are that important I know a lot of people do there will be a couple USB ports as well. There will also be 2 or 3 12V cigarette lighter plugs as well. Now to the unique stuff that I haven't been able to find anywhere else. I have found a source that can provide a 30 amp DC-DC charger, solar MPPT charge controller and battery isolator. There will be two 50AMP Anderson Plugs for charging and supplying power to accessories.

The system would be a true plug and play dual battery system able to charge from 12V plug in, AC wall charger, DC-DC charger from your alternator and solar. The unit will be fully self contained and neatly packaged so the only thing needed to install would be attaching the wires to the truck battery and plug in the Anderson plug and fasten it down. I plan to even provide the wiring for the installation.

As of right now I am planning on two sizes 100AH and 200AH units. Tentative measurements will be about 17x10x13 and 55 pounds for the 100AH and 17x10x17 and 88 pounds for the 200AH unit.

My question for you guys is what am I missing? What other features would y'all like to see and what would y'all throw out? And what kind of value does a system like this have for you?

Although this is very fluid right now the preliminary costs for the units would be approximately $1500 for the 100AH unit and $1900 for the 200AH unit. Although that seems like a lot of money on the surface When you total up what all of the separate parts would cost with quality equipment it is much less. Using one of the most popular battery options, BattleBorn, the two batteries alone would cost as much as the entire 200Ah system. Then when you throw in the chargers and everything else we will include you get a much better value than building your own system would provide.

Please provide any feedback, interest and suggestions you guys may have for me.

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BDinTX

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I'd like to see something that uses the Ego batteries or something similar. I don't like the idea of a piece of gear that has to go back to an authorized service center just to swap out batteries that are old. The Ego ones come in several sizes and can be used in their tools (lawn mower, edger, weed eater, chainsaw, etc) so you can get double duty out of the batteries, and I have a few of them already... ; )
 
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TennesseePA

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That would be a tough thing for me to do because I’d have to convert the voltage down from 56v to 12v. And it is also a question of market size. How many people have e-go tools and need an outdoor power system?

I I will also add that they have a limited capacity compared to their size. They have approximately 30% the capacity as the smaller option I am having built.
 
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I'd like to see something that uses the Ego batteries or something similar. I don't like the idea of a piece of gear that has to go back to an authorized service center just to swap out batteries that are old. The Ego ones come in several sizes and can be used in their tools (lawn mower, edger, weed eater, chainsaw, etc) so you can get double duty out of the batteries, and I have a few of them already... ; )
https://www.homedepot.com/p/EGO-Nex...o-7-5-Ah-Batteries-Included-PST3042/305092922 here ya go. But the biggest problem that I can see is that there is no 12V cigarette lighter plug for the fridge. Also they are not LiFePO4 chemistry. According to their own website they claim, as this is significant, that after 800-1200 cycles their battery retains 60% capacity. LiFePO4 batteries are known to retain 90% capacity after as many as 5000 cycles.

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BDinTX

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Good points
 

rustyshakelford

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We were pretty hard pressed to get a goalzero to help power our fridge when needed but ended up bringing a Honda 2kw generator and I absolutely fell in love with that. its right around a grand and was using less than a gallon over 10 hours.

for a battery pack to be competitive with that and I’d be looking at how long is the recharge time, what’s the most efficient route (12v plug the cargo area, how long does the Jeep need to be on to recharge) is that location suitable for the load needed to recharge. What’s the realistic run time for a 66watt cooler and possibly a heater (have an overland build coming up and these are discussions we’ve been having)

I used to be against batteries but have seen the incredible benefits and capabilities as they have matured. I certainly like them for certain reasons but when you start getting into the bigger amp hour stuff, I don’t have much knowledge and genuinely are curious.

brett
 
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Where did you get the 430wh information? I've looked at quite a few online Mopar sources and didn't see any specs on it.

Are you sure you're talking about the 48volt battery under the vehicle (rear driver side just in front of the axle) or are you referencing the small battery underneath the main battery on the 3.6 and non eTorque 2.0 engines?
We were pretty hard pressed to get a goalzero to help power our fridge when needed but ended up bringing a Honda 2kw generator and I absolutely fell in love with that. its right around a grand and was using less than a gallon over 10 hours.

for a battery pack to be competitive with that and I’d be looking at how long is the recharge time, what’s the most efficient route (12v plug the cargo area, how long does the Jeep need to be on to recharge) is that location suitable for the load needed to recharge. What’s the realistic run time for a 66watt cooler and possibly a heater (have an overland build coming up and these are discussions we’ve been having)

I used to be against batteries but have seen the incredible benefits and capabilities as they have matured. I certainly like them for certain reasons but when you start getting into the bigger amp hour stuff, I don’t have much knowledge and genuinely are curious.

brett
I like my generator too. That being said many camping spots require you to turn your generator off during quiet hours. My people are also becoming quite eco-conscious and like the thought of a battery system. Running a heater is a little tricky for both the battery system AND the generator. Your Honda is rated for about 10 hours at 25% load right? Well the average electric heater is 1200w which is well over that 25% rating so your fuel consumption will go up according to your power usage. My biggest battery will power a 1200w load for about 2.5 hours. Still not as good as any of my generators but better than any other battery system on the planet.
Charge time is another thing you mentioned. The 30 amp DC-DC charger in my system will charge the 200 Ah batteries from fully flat to 85% in about 6 hours. The last bit to top off is slower because of the way chargers drop current as batteries reach capacity. The beauty of my system is that the 240ah capacity means that the 85% will give you 200ah of useable power without waiting for the top off cycle. Depending on where you are I’d bet that most of the time a good solar charger will keep the batteries at or near 100% during the day as long as you don’t run any crazy loads.
 
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TennesseePA

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OK I am moving forward with the power supply thing but costs have started getting the best of me. I have created a gofundme page with one caveat. Anyone who donates will get double their donation back as a discount on a future product purchase up to $1,000. If anyone is interested you can read about me and the power supply I am developing here.

https://www.gofundme.com/new-eco-business-startup
 
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