Type of oil from factory?

WXman

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The 2017 JK recommends 5W-20 oil. Has anything really changed in the updated JL 3.6 that requires 0W-20 or is FCA just trying to increase fuel economy?

Would 5W-20 protect better or is the 0W or 5W only a factor during sub zero temps?

There seems to be a few cases of rocker arms freezing up on the new 3.6, hopefully not oil related.

https://www.jlwranglerforums.com/forum/threads/new-jeep-sport-s-with-check-engine-light.9377/
It's all for CAFE requirements. Every 0.1 MPG matters to a company who is mass producing vehicles.

I'm big into Mustangs also and for years Ford has spec'd 5W20 oil in the base V8 models. However, the same car with the "track package" specs 5W50. Hmm... does Ford know that higher viscosity protects the engine better? Of course they do, which is why they spec it on "enthusiast" models.

There's also an article out there that showed that switching to 5W30 from 5W20 can add up to 30% more life to the engine internals.

All FCA (or any company) cares about is getting through warranty period. After that, it is YOUR baby. If you plan to drive your vehicle long term, I would strongly consider a better viscosity oil after you reach the end of powertrain warranty.

As soon as mine gets to 60,000 miles it'll never see the 0W20 water ever again.
 

DanW

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Remember this. Friction is the enemy of both fuel economy and longevity. Not one over the other. They go hand in hand.

Show me the evidence that 0w20 causes more wear than say, 5w20, or 5w30, or whatever.

The 0w20s on the market have had huge investment in their development. If they increased wear, you'd see manufacturers shorten the oil change intervals. Instead, they've lengthened them.

For example, the flash point on Mobil 1 AP 0w20 is higher than the other weights, including 5w30. That means the 5w30 can't take as much heat, and will burst into flames at a lower temperature.

Also, most people don't realize that the oil plays a significant role in keeping heat under control. Thinner oil transfers heat more quickly. The engine oil cooler works more effectively, too.

Here's an interesting piece of data. The flash point for Pennzoil 10w30 is 430 degrees. Mobil 1 AP 0w20 has a flash point of 468 degrees. For Mobil 1 AP 5w30, it is 450. For good measure, Castrol Edge Supercar 5w50 is only 410.

I've seen nothing to prove that heavier oils cause less friction. The thinnest oil above will still be there when the others are burning.

Another benefit is that the M1AP 0w20 flows down to 49 degrees below zero. That fancy 5w50? It pours down to only 22 below.

It is generally accepted that most engine wear occurs at startup. I'll bet that 0w20 gets to critical surfaces much faster than thicker oils.

Conventional wisdom is a strong force, but in some cases, it just might be wrong.
 

WXman

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Remember this. Friction is the enemy of both fuel economy and longevity. Not one over the other. They go hand in hand.

Show me the evidence that 0w20 causes more wear than say, 5w20, or 5w30, or whatever.

The 0w20s on the market have had huge investment in their development. If they increased wear, you'd see manufacturers shorten the oil change intervals. Instead, they've lengthened them.

For example, the flash point on Mobil 1 AP 0w20 is higher than the other weights, including 5w30. That means the 5w30 can't take as much heat, and will burst into flames at a lower temperature.

Also, most people don't realize that the oil plays a significant role in keeping heat under control. Thinner oil transfers heat more quickly. The engine oil cooler works more effectively, too.

Here's an interesting piece of data. The flash point for Pennzoil 10w30 is 430 degrees. Mobil 1 AP 0w20 has a flash point of 468 degrees. For Mobil 1 AP 5w30, it is 450. For good measure, Castrol Edge Supercar 5w50 is only 410.

I've seen nothing to prove that heavier oils cause less friction. The thinnest oil above will still be there when the others are burning.

Another benefit is that the M1AP 0w20 flows down to 49 degrees below zero. That fancy 5w50? It pours down to only 22 below.

It is generally accepted that most engine wear occurs at startup. I'll bet that 0w20 gets to critical surfaces much faster than thicker oils.

Conventional wisdom is a strong force, but in some cases, it just might be wrong.
Show me evidence that 0W20 doesn't shorten engine life.

Some automakers have lengthened intervals, only to turn around and shorten them again after having rampant engine failures at low mileage. MINI is a quick one that comes to mind.

Again, "lifetime" trans fluid, long engine oil intervals, etc. are all marketing ploys to make a vehicle seem like a less expensive investment. It plays well in the minds of consumers. And, to an automaker all they care about is CAFE and getting to the end of warranty period. FCA doesn't give a rat's ass if your Jeep makes it to 200,000 miles. In fact, they probably hope it doesn't so you'll buy another sooner.

To each their own, but it's widely known that 5W30 and 5W40 oils protect better than 0W20 oils and for me, longevity and reliability is what matters. I'll gladly give up 0.1 MPG.
 

DanW

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Here are some more....

Pennzoil Platinum 10w30...flash point 410 degrees, pour point -33.

Pennzoil Platinum 0w20, 410 and -54 (wow!)

Pennzoil Platinum Racing 10w60, 435 and -49.

Valvoline Modern Engine 0w20, 428 and -38.2.

Valvoline Modern Engine 5w30, 437 and -33.

All are excellent oils, but heavier weights don't necessarily break down at higher temperatures. The base oil and additives make more of a difference. Group IV true synthetics clearly outperform Group III or dino base stocks, at both high and low temperatures. I'm going with more opposition than IV in my Jeep.
 

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Show me evidence that 0W20 doesn't shorten engine life.

Some automakers have lengthened intervals, only to turn around and shorten them again after having rampant engine failures at low mileage. MINI is a quick one that comes to mind.

Again, "lifetime" trans fluid, long engine oil intervals, etc. are all marketing ploys to make a vehicle seem like a less expensive investment. It plays well in the minds of consumers. And, to an automaker all they care about is CAFE and getting to the end of warranty period. FCA doesn't give a rat's ass if your Jeep makes it to 200,000 miles. In fact, they probably hope it doesn't so you'll buy another sooner.

To each their own, but it's widely known that 5W30 and 5W40 oils protect better than 0W20 oils and for me, longevity and reliability is what matters. I'll gladly give up 0.1 MPG.
Widely known? Where? So you think, say, regular dino 5w30 protects better than a group IV synthetic 0w20? It won't at 460 degrees. I doubt it will at 70.

As far as shortening intervals, I've only seen that on direct injected engines. Show me a port injected engine where that has happened. DI engines are notorious for fuel dilution, which degrades the oil more quickly. The 3.6 isn't known for high fuel dilution or rapid degradation of the oil.
 

islandtees

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Show me evidence that 0W20 doesn't shorten engine life.

Some automakers have lengthened intervals, only to turn around and shorten them again after having rampant engine failures at low mileage. MINI is a quick one that comes to mind.

Again, "lifetime" trans fluid, long engine oil intervals, etc. are all marketing ploys to make a vehicle seem like a less expensive investment. It plays well in the minds of consumers. And, to an automaker all they care about is CAFE and getting to the end of warranty period. FCA doesn't give a rat's ass if your Jeep makes it to 200,000 miles. In fact, they probably hope it doesn't so you'll buy another sooner.

To each their own, but it's widely known that 5W30 and 5W40 oils protect better than 0W20 oils and for me, longevity and reliability is what matters. I'll gladly give up 0.1 MPG.
Could you please direct us to the articles that say widely known that 5W30 protects better than 0W20 oil.
 

thefrog

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I know it’s a very old thread but I think I read through it all. Has anyone actually answer the OP’s question? What oil does the JL come with from the factory specifically?
 

Hootbro

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I know it’s a very old thread but I think I read through it all. Has anyone actually answer the OP’s question? What oil does the JL come with from the factory specifically?
Short of finding someone working at the factory taking a picture of the bulk oil tank fill delivery invoice, you are not going to get a definitive answer.

Best guess has already been mentioned in that in all likelihood, it is going to be a Pennzoil/Shell product and the cheapest one the meets the MS 6395 spec FCA calls out is going to be the synthetic blend Pennzoil Gold 0W-20 product.

Initial factory fill oil analysis that have been done are going to be inconclusive as there is assembly lubes and initial leaching of sealant properties and other assembly chemicals that can skew a factory fill oil analysis with high Molybdenum being the biggest one showing.
 

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To each their own, but it's widely known that 5W30 and 5W40 oils protect better than 0W20 oils and for me, longevity and reliability is what matters. I'll gladly give up 0.1 MPG.
…and your engine warranty if it fails and FCA can prove you weren't using the specified viscocity of oil.
 

RoadiJeff

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…and your engine warranty if it fails and FCA can prove you weren't using the specified viscocity of oil.
Exactly. Here's what it says right in the Wrangler warranty guide about that:

3.3.Maintenance Costs Not Covered
Your warranties do not cover the costs of repairing damage caused by poor or improper maintenance. Nor do they cover damage caused by the use of contaminated fuels, or by the use of fuels, oils, lubricants, cleaners or fluids other than those recommended in your Owner’s Manual.
 

CarbonSteel

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…and your engine warranty if it fails and FCA can prove you weren't using the specified viscocity of oil.
How would they go about doing that? Oils can thin from shearing and thicken from oxidation so it would be hit or miss trying to use viscosity to prove anything. Not all additives show in a UOA so that would be worthless too. Short of the owner telling them the oil type, good luck to FCA trying to prove anything related to what oil was in use.

Last, but not least, when was the last time anyone heard of oil causing an engine failure if changed regularly?
 

RoadiJeff

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To maintain the warranty and prove that regular maintenance was performed according to the schedule the owner needs to save receipts of any parts, fluids, etc., that was purchased to verify that the work was being done. Those receipts will show exactly what oil was purchased.
 

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To maintain the warranty and prove that regular maintenance was performed according to the schedule the owner needs to save receipts of any parts, fluids, etc., that was purchased to verify that the work was being done. Those receipts will show exactly what oil was purchased.
Not to be belabor the point, but it is important to note that FCA does not require any certain brand, viscosity, type (conventional, blend, or synthetic) or specification be used. If they did, they would have to supply the oil for you to use free of charge. The same applies to oil filters or any other maintenance item.

Read the owner's manual, you will not find the word "require", "requires", or "shall not" in any of the verbiage--you will only see "recommend", "recommends", or "should not". These words both from a definition and legal standpoint are not the same as "FCA requires... " or "Owner shall not...".

Case in point:

Oil1.png


Oil2.png


Oil3.png
 

RoadiJeff

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Not to be belabor the point, but it is important to note that FCA does not require any certain brand, viscosity, type (conventional, blend, or synthetic) or specification be used. If they did, they would have to supply the oil for you to use free of charge. The same applies to oil filters or any other maintenance item.

Read the owner's manual, you will not find the word "require", "requires", or "shall not" in any of the verbiage--you will only see "recommend", "recommends", or "should not". These words both from a definition and legal standpoint are not the same as "FCA requires... " or "Owner shall not...".

Case in point:

Oil1.png


Oil2.png


Oil3.png
Did you read the section that I quoted out of the Wrangler warranty guide?

3.3.Maintenance Costs Not Covered
Your warranties do not cover the costs of repairing damage caused by poor or improper maintenance. Nor do they cover damage caused by the use of contaminated fuels, or by the use of fuels, oils, lubricants, cleaners or fluids other than those recommended in your Owner’s Manual.
 

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