TrailRecon drops the Diesel

Wrangler man

Well-Known Member
First Name
Howard
Joined
Aug 24, 2019
Threads
0
Messages
245
Reaction score
220
Location
Palm Springs
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLUAD
I really enjoy watching his videos and I have a bit of respect for Brad’s opinions, however, I do think he missed the mark on the diesel.

I’m fairly certain he never regeared, yes? Based on all the reading I’ve done here and other forums, it seems the folks on 37+ tires who regeared their diesels haven’t had issues with overheating. Perhaps if he’d been at, say, 4.10’s or even 4.56’s there wouldn’t have been an issue. I also think going WOT under load with a steep grade at altitude isn’t the greatest idea. We pull a fairly heavy TT with our F-350 6.0 diesel and I’ve always taken it easy up grades by running it at a higher RPM. Even over max weight when moving my wife out here from New Mexico, going up the mountains into Vegas in 110* heat.

I dunno. I realize it’s apples to oranges. I’ll be running 35’s on mine most likely, with a high probability of picking up a Patriot camper as well. Guess I’ll see if I have similar issues.
KC250 who owned the 1st 3.0 EcoDiesel in Canada already commented on this. His friend Sean who also had the EcoDiesel diesel in the Gladiator had 456 regarding they both experienced the same overheating issues at the exact same time. They were at high elevations on a very steep grade deep grade he claims it was the hottest day he ever experienced. He had put thousands upon thousands of miles across Canada and through a good portion of the United States. He only experienced it one time but it forced him and his buddy SeanIs to a maximum speed of 40 miles an hour. I've never experienced it but in the event I'm in a extreme heat low density air situation like that I'd rather my engine degrade to prevent any serious engine damage or mechanical issues. This just recently happened case in point one of our fleet vehicles at work was pushed well beyond its capability because the payload was far exceeded. Not low density air situations but extreme heat on an extreme grade. The operator saw the temperature rising and and just pushed it anyway basically destroying the engine it's seized and hasn't run since.

 

ChuckQue

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2022
Threads
6
Messages
250
Reaction score
306
Location
SoCal
Vehicle(s)
2022 JLURD
KC250 who owned the 1st 3.0 EcoDiesel in Canada already commented on this. His friend Sean who also had the EcoDiesel diesel in the Gladiator had 456 regarding they both experienced the same overheating issues at the exact same time. They were at high elevations on a very steep grade deep grade he claims it was the hottest day he ever experienced. He had put thousands upon thousands of miles across Canada and through a good portion of the United States. He only experienced it one time but it forced him and his buddy SeanIs to a maximum speed of 40 miles an hour. I've never experienced it but in the event I'm in a extreme heat low density air situation like that I'd rather my engine degrade to prevent any serious engine damage or mechanical issues. This just recently happened case in point one of our fleet vehicles at work was pushed well beyond its capability because the payload was far exceeded. Not low density air situations but extreme heat on an extreme grade. The operator saw the temperature rising and and just pushed it anyway basically destroying the engine it's seized and hasn't run since.
Yeah, I agree. I figure I’ll monitor temps and reduce speed/increase RPM’s to lower boost. Sounds like having the Tazer override for the e-fan helps in conjunction with opening up the hood vents. I still want to measure the e-fan CFM and see if there’s room for improvement there with a SPAL.
 

Ratbert

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Threads
31
Messages
2,792
Reaction score
3,247
Location
COS region, CO
Vehicle(s)
JLU Rubicon (totaled), AMG GLC43
Occupation
Software Engineer
KC250 who owned the 1st 3.0 EcoDiesel in Canada already commented on this. His friend Sean who also had the EcoDiesel diesel in the Gladiator had 456 regarding they both experienced the same overheating issues at the exact same time. They were at high elevations on a very steep grade deep grade he claims it was the hottest day he ever experienced. He had put thousands upon thousands of miles across Canada and through a good portion of the United States. He only experienced it one time but it forced him and his buddy SeanIs to a maximum speed of 40 miles an hour. I've never experienced it but in the event I'm in a extreme heat low density air situation like that I'd rather my engine degrade to prevent any serious engine damage or mechanical issues. This just recently happened case in point one of our fleet vehicles at work was pushed well beyond its capability because the payload was far exceeded. Not low density air situations but extreme heat on an extreme grade. The operator saw the temperature rising and and just pushed it anyway basically destroying the engine it's seized and hasn't run since.
Mine will be pretty damn heavy from the start: full AEV JL370 build, winch, skid plates, rock sliders, roof rack, RTT, Goose Gear, fridge, etc. We also sometimes put the RTT on a small military-style trailer and pull that. I need to start keeping track of the weight of each, but it's a crapload.

I live at 7,400 feet and most of our excursions go up from there. The diesel seems like an appropriate choice to be able to handle the weight, but I'm a little concerned about it wimping out when we use it to climb another half mile or so in elevation. We'll see.
 

HBDiesel

Banned
Banned
Banned
First Name
J
Joined
May 28, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
100
Reaction score
113
Location
Texas
Vehicle(s)
22 Wrangler 2018 Tundra 2018 4Runner 69 Chevelle
Doubt the diesel wimps out before the 3.6 or 2.0. Jeeps clearly aren’t made to tow they are off road vehicles built for lady’s or lady size men😜. That tiny grill and tiny radiator could be improved. What’s most of the world use off road?

 

TopLift Pros
 
Top