Traction boards vs traction mats in snow

Brian1022

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I have seen a lot of boards that compare different traction boards over wide ground conditions, but I am trying to specifically talk about snow and introduce the idea of the mat. The general consensus is that the Max Trax are the best albeit expensive, but they are large too. Who has tested boards to the flexible rubber mats, preferable with a Rubicon on stock Ko2s, but all data is appreciated.

One example of the mats
Amazon.com: JOJOMARK Tire Traction Mat, Recovery Track Portable Emergency Devices for Snow, Ice, Mud, and Sand Used to Cars, Trucks, Van or Fleet Vehicle (2pcs39in): Automotive

I like the concept of being able to roll them up and store them more easily, but do they work (in snow) relative to the boards? Is it worth the space savings?





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JeepinJason33

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I have done a fair bit of snow wheeling here in Denver and the NorthEast. The mats seem to sink into the snow under the weight of the vehicle rather rest on top, same with sand. Think about a snow shoe as an example, those are rigid. I don't carry either by the way. Unless you are wheeling by yourself, you should be able to get a tug back or forward from someone else.
 
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Brian1022

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I have done a fair bit of snow wheeling here in Denver and the NorthEast. The mats seem to sink into the snow under the weight of the vehicle rather rest on top, same with sand. Think about a snow shoe as an example, those are rigid. I don't carry either by the way. Unless you are wheeling by yourself, you should be able to get a tug back or forward from someone else.
That makes sense, thank you. If I could reach solid ground for the mats not to sink, chances are pretty good I won't need the help. The boards would make more sense as a backup in case I get mired in deep snow
Thank you!
 

Lmike6453

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I'm curious if anyone has got stuck and used these "floppy" traction boards yet?
 

MrMischief

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Maybe a floppy mat would work on ice or packed snow when you have bald tires, but I really don't see how they would work soft surfaces. It also seems if you have quality tires, the mats are unlikely to have more traction on ice than your tire.

I do not like traction boards, in general. I have seem them work in snow, but they also seem to bend and snap quite easily. maybe the snow is too soft? They just seem to flex then snap. It also looks like that on most brands any amount of tire slipping on the board will quickly ruin them. If the quality boards were much more affordable then I might be more willing to try them. I just think you're better off saving your money for a winch.
 

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