DigitalDiem

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Falken Wildpeak AT3W

255/75/R18

Noise 10
Ride 10
Dry 10
Wet 9
Snow x
Trail 9
Look 9

I replaced the Factory Bridgestone with these in the OE size at 4k miles. I am not lifted and I don't do much mud or Rock crawling. These ride really good, quiet and get's me through everything I need to go through. A great alternative if you are staying in the OE size range. Haven't seen winter yet with these In the Jeep so I can't comment. I have KO2 on my Silverado Z71 4wd that are great and My Wife has these Falkens on her '17 Colorado Z71 4wd. I can say hers does great all the way around. We have had hers on for 2 snow seasons and they have been great on her truck. The wear on hers at 42K miles is great. Looks like they could go another 42K.



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These tires have been great with one exception, they don't wear as well as they have on the wife's Colorado ( which is gone as she traded for a 2021 Ram) I have 40K miles on them and looking to replace them. They are getting louder and are cupping. NO matter what tire pressure or rotation frequency they are cupping. New Shocks as well. New Iron Steering box, ETC. Alignment spot on. May try TOYO next.
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RNLROCK

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I replaced my Bridgestone OEM tires with the Continental TerrainContact A/T tires.

Beware! I have had them road-force balanced twice since the original installation and they are still not balanced. I read quite a few reviews that claim the same thing.

My dealer is swapping them out for the Falken WildPeaks.
 

DigitalDiem

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I replaced my Bridgestone OEM tires with the Continental TerrainContact A/T tires.

Beware! I have had them road-force balanced twice since the original installation and they are still not balanced. I read quite a few reviews that claim the same thing.

My dealer is swapping them out for the Falken WildPeaks.
Good Luck with the Falkens. Mine are being replaced with 39589 miles on them with TOYO Open Country AT3. I wish they would have worn Better. They were great on the Wife's Colorado. Initially they were great on the Jeep. I am a stickler on tire pressure and keeping things aligned and rotated. The Falkens are just worn out.
 
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Good Luck with the Falkens. Mine are being replaced with 39589 miles on them with TOYO Open Country AT3. I wish they would have worn Better. ....
Well 40K isn't too far from the specified 55K but it is shorter than they are rated. FWIW, they allegedly have a 55K warranty (limited of course) so who knows if they'd honor it. And of course I'm sure it would be a pro-rated amount if they do, but still better than nothing.
For me, any tire exceeding 36K is "acceptable" wear. That gets you 3 years at the typical 12K per year range. Although for me 36K is more like 6+ years so that does make me a little less picky about long term wear.
 

RNLROCK

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Good Luck with the Falkens. Mine are being replaced with 39589 miles on them with TOYO Open Country AT3. I wish they would have worn Better. They were great on the Wife's Colorado. Initially they were great on the Jeep. I am a stickler on tire pressure and keeping things aligned and rotated. The Falkens are just worn out.
Let me know how they compare to the Falkens in terms of handling and smoothness.
 

Whaler27

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I’m enjoying this read. I’m only at page 7 of the thread, so perhaps somebody has already linked this popular chart. If so, I’ll apologize and delete it when I can get back to my computer and finish the thread:

AT comparison chart

The advantage of these charts, is they provide aggregate data over thousands of users and millions of miles. There are several such charts, each with a different primary focus.

As for my personal experience, I give two thumbs up for the KO2s after over 150,000 miles in aggregate. They’re quiet, wear well, and provide very good traction in most environments. (They’re terrible in mud, of course, and equally terrible in hydroplane propensity if there is standing water.). (I had over 100,000 miles in aggregate on the old BFG ATs too.)

I’m on my third set of Duratracs, all studded for winter use. They wear much faster than KO2s, and two of the 12 tires I’ve bought have required a LOT of weight to balance (almost), but the traction on snow and wet ice is the best I’ve ever had, and they cut through standing water — so they’re my go to winter tire in the northwest, where we get extremely heavy snow and plenty of ice and standing water. Unfortunately, the Duratracs don’t wear like the KO2s.

We’ve also had four sets of Toyo MTs. Amazingly quiet for such an aggressive, big-lugged tire. They wear forever too. Good in mud and deep snow. Mediocre dry traction, like most hard-rubber tires with big lugs, and not prone to hydroplane. Absolutely terrible on ice. (We had a set on our diesel F-350 with a 1200 pound tool box in the bed. Several winters back I repeatedly tried tried to get up our driveway and couldn’t make it past half way. I even tried in reverse, thinking it might be an advantage to have the weight of the diesel over the rear-most tires pushing the truck up the hill. Nope. I immediately went to the tire store and swapped out the tires. When I got home I motored up the driveway easily, without even having to get a run at it. (Both the KO2s and the Duratracs performed brilliantly on that ice. The Toyos were like running on polished concrete with football cleats…)
 

redracer

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Tire, Noise, Ride, Dry, Wet, Snow, Trail, Look, Overall
Mickey Thompson Baja ATZ, 6, 9, 9, 8, 8, 10, 10, 9
 

TX_Ovrlnd

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I've used Toyo Open Country AT's and MT's, Nitto Trail Grapplers and Ridge Grapplers, Geolandar AT's, and Cooper STT Pro's. I loved the Toyo's but out of all those tire combos I think the Cooper's felt the best on and off road. They were great in snow and ice also, I only had the truck they were on for about 15k miles but they seemed to be holding up very well.
 

DigitalDiem

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Well 40K isn't too far from the specified 55K but it is shorter than they are rated. FWIW, they allegedly have a 55K warranty (limited of course) so who knows if they'd honor it. And of course I'm sure it would be a pro-rated amount if they do, but still better than nothing.
For me, any tire exceeding 36K is "acceptable" wear. That gets you 3 years at the typical 12K per year range. Although for me 36K is more like 6+ years so that does make me a little less picky about long term wear.
I mis-spoke. the Falkens have 35k on them. 39k on the Jeep. Just put NITTO Ridge Grapplers on Yesterday. Night and Day Difference. 285/75 R17 E rated tires ride better than the SL Rated Falkens. And nowhere near as noisy. I'm sure that will change over time as it did with the Falkens. Changed wheels as well. Nittos are crazy expensive though.
 
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Shots

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Now that is interesting. I've always thought the Wildpeak AT3 were extremely quiet for a A/T tire. I'd actually go as far to say they rival a lot of HP tires. If the Ridge Grappler is quieter I just might have to give them a shot next time I'm tire shopping. I've looked at them more than once, but I've been concerned with noise, because I can't stand loud tires. I'll be interested to see if you're opinion changes after you've put a lot more miles on them. I appreciate the info.
 
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I’m enjoying this read. I’m only at page 7 of the thread, so perhaps somebody has already linked this popular chart. If so, I’ll apologize and delete it when I can get back to my computer and finish the thread:

AT comparison chart

The advantage of these charts, is they provide aggregate data over thousands of users and millions of miles. There are several such charts, each with a different primary focus.
.....
No need to delete it, keep it there. I actually got the idea for this thread/chart from tirerack's tire rating system. I hadn't seen their comparison chart, it's quite nice.

The key difference to this thread is that all the ratings are from Jeep owners. It started out broader, but I was able to eliminate the non-forum reviews after getting enough responses from the folks here. With that, the ratings will reflect how the tires are on our specific vehicles, as opposed to somewhere like tirerack where the tire could be on something like a 3500 Cummins dually. Sure they may both be running a KO2 (for example) but I'm sure it handles and wears differently on something like that it does on a Wrangler. Not to discount their chart, it's a great tool and as you mentioned reflects a lot more miles of "testing" so certainly worth having linked here.
 

Whaler27

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No need to delete it, keep it there. I actually got the idea for this thread/chart from tirerack's tire rating system. I hadn't seen their comparison chart, it's quite nice.

The key difference to this thread is that all the ratings are from Jeep owners. It started out broader, but I was able to eliminate the non-forum reviews after getting enough responses from the folks here. With that, the ratings will reflect how the tires are on our specific vehicles, as opposed to somewhere like tirerack where the tire could be on something like a 3500 Cummins dually. Sure they may both be running a KO2 (for example) but I'm sure it handles and wears differently on something like that it does on a Wrangler. Not to discount their chart, it's a great tool and as you mentioned reflects a lot more miles of "testing" so certainly worth having linked here.
Copy.

I think the general/comparative characteristics of a tire are constant across vehicles, but the balance between the strengths and weaknesses shifts.

We ran the Toyo MTs on our F350 and 3500/Cummins diesel trucks because those diesels are so heavy they burn through softer tires like a hot knife through butter, especially if you spend a lot of time on sharp chip-seal roads, as we did. The KO2s were pretty durable, but they provided almost no traction on winter logging cuts/roads, because they immediately load with mud and don't clear well. (Also, I ran 35x12.50x16.5s -- not a very big tire for a vehicle which weighed almost 8,600 pounds loaded. But even with all that weight helping to keep the tread on the road, the F-350s would hydroplane terribly if you hit inch-deep puddles on the highway. I had two full-blown butt-puckers hitting puddles on the interstate -- the kind where you hear the loss of tire noise and traction and, for a second or two, the truck is 15 to 20 degrees off course before returning to center.) After those experiences we went to winter tires that had a pattern open enough to evacuate water. The BFG KM3s worked well while they lasted, but were reduced to noisy wobblers in less than 20,000 miles on the diesel, so we switched to the Toyos and Duratracs. The Toyos held up great. They were the best balance we found for trucks that had to occasionally run in mud, as long as you never get near ice.

I have 37" KO2s on my JL and 35" KO2s on the Raptor. The KO2 surface area to vehicle weight relationship on the light JL makes it the perfect floater -- a hydroplane machine -- so I'd never run that combination in a northwest winter... In five weeks we do our seasonal tire swap: I bolt up the 37" studded Grabbers (on the JL -- because Duratracs aren't available in that size), and 35" studded Duratracs on the Raptor.
 
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DigitalDiem

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Now that is interesting. I've always thought the Wildpeak AT3 were extremely quiet for a A/T tire. I'd actually go as far to say they rival a lot of HP tires. If the Ridge Grappler is quieter I just might have to give them a shot next time I'm tire shopping. I've looked at them more than once, but I've been concerned with noise, because I can't stand loud tires. I'll be interested to see if you're opinion changes after you've put a lot more miles on them. I appreciate the info.
The WIldpeaks were near silent at first then after 35k miles they got real noisy. The Ridge Grapplers make an albeit minor sing at about 80mph. Yes I recalibrated for tire size with my Tazer. I bought these as a second choice to the TOYOs which I couldn't find anywhere except National BackOrder Until December. I will say the Wildpeaks were great in the snow. Not too sure how these NITTOs will be. However our local Jeep club has a crew that go out during snow storms pulling people out for fun. Most have these tires and swear by them.
 

Mx5red

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I've had bad cupping on my front Wildpeak A/Ts on my gladiator.. to be fair I didn't rotate until 15,000. But, my wife's wrangler has KO2s and they are wearing evenly on same schedule.
I have not gotten an alignment or anything but I would be pretty surprised if my stock Gladiator had a major alignment issue.
They were both very quiet new, my Wildpeaks got noisier.. not sure if that would be as noticeable if rotated more and no cupping.

I don't have much experience in mud or snow, but the Wildpeaks seemed to do ok in the few times we've driven in snow. I've had worse passenger tires I feel like.
 

DigitalDiem

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I've had bad cupping on my front Wildpeak A/Ts on my gladiator.. to be fair I didn't rotate until 15,000. But, my wife's wrangler has KO2s and they are wearing evenly on same schedule.
I have not gotten an alignment or anything but I would be pretty surprised if my stock Gladiator had a major alignment issue.
They were both very quiet new, my Wildpeaks got noisier.. not sure if that would be as noticeable if rotated more and no cupping.

I don't have much experience in mud or snow, but the Wildpeaks seemed to do ok in the few times we've driven in snow. I've had worse passenger tires I feel like.
My Wildpeaks were rotated with every oil change. 5K miles. 35psi New Steering Stabilizer (TSP Replacement) New Steering box (TSB Repair) Still got noisy. They are made in Korea and my NITTO are made in the USA. Only time will tell.
 
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