Taking your dog in the Jeep.

LittleDog

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I think my dog is more excited to go wheelin than I am.

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Is that a Dachshund and Miniature Pinscher mix? Maybe some Basset or something in there? Looks like ready to catch a rabbit or eat a badger.

Wanted to elevate the dog bucket too for extra storage, or to stick an ice pack under the Little Dog's butt in the summer, but he's too fat. Good option for smaller dogs though.

Did you bolt that radio bracket right into the plastic cover of the transmission tunnel?,
 

LittleDog

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I’ve tried netting between the front seats with moving blankets on the rear seats, folded down, dog bed tossed in. I’ve tried the hammock setups with side door protection. I’ve tried the strap that belts the dog in to the seat belt to limit movement. All of this and what I’ve seen other in this thread are good solutions. Dog size is everything.

What I didn’t account for was the anxious nature of my 80lb Labrador. She insists on being up front! So much so that while netted in the back she ate through several portions of the net in seconds AND completely through the rear seat belt straps. Both of them! Elapsed time to accomplish the destruction? The five minutes it took me to drive to our vet for her annual visit. OMG! She’s otherwise the mellowest dog but rides in the Jeep flip her out…SMH.
Several possible causes, but should be correctable.

Is she still young? Still trainable when they're old, just takes longer sometimes. The most important thing is how much effort you put in.

Try starting her out again on super boring rides. Stuff like, once around the neighborhood, or just getting gas, with praise when she's calm, but ignore her otherwise. A treat whenever you park, and at the end. Then do it again ten minutes later. Do it a lot. Park randomly, walk a little bit away, and pretend to look at the scenery. Come back with a treat, but she only gets it if she's calm.

If really bad, have her sit in the back in the driveway as you just hang out in the jeep. Listen to music or check e-mails/jeep forums for a while. Treat at the end.

Upgrade to working on the jeep or puttering around the garage with her sitting in the back, and give her treats from a dog-proof container sitting next to her. If she enjoys chews, have something available. Let her learn to be allowed to be bored and not care about you while in the jeep.

Start slow to find her threshold. If she only lasts ten seconds of ignoring her before destroying everything, wait nine seconds before giving praise and a treat, then keep pushing the envelope.

You pretty much want her thought process to be, "what, again? I don't care anymore", instrad of anxiety whilst sitting in the jeep.

Or ignore everything above, but learn and follow another training regimen, rigorously. There are many paths, but it's all time, repetition, and effort.

Sorry to sound pedantic, but I've seen/know too many dogs that are, "just like that", or "can't be changed", that decrease the quality of life for owner, animal, and everyone else involved.

Hope you are able to enjoy many fun rides with your dog in the future. But stay the heck away from me, Little Dog has leash-aggression issues.
 

Grooster

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Several possible causes, but should be correctable.

Is she still young? Still trainable when they're old, just takes longer sometimes. The most important thing is how much effort you put in.

Try starting her out again on super boring rides. Stuff like, once around the neighborhood, or just getting gas, with praise when she's calm, but ignore her otherwise. A treat whenever you park, and at the end. Then do it again ten minutes later. Do it a lot. Park randomly, walk a little bit away, and pretend to look at the scenery. Come back with a treat, but she only gets it if she's calm.

If really bad, have her sit in the back in the driveway as you just hang out in the jeep. Listen to music or check e-mails/jeep forums for a while. Treat at the end.

Upgrade to working on the jeep or puttering around the garage with her sitting in the back, and give her treats from a dog-proof container sitting next to her. If she enjoys chews, have something available. Let her learn to be allowed to be bored and not care about you while in the jeep.

Start slow to find her threshold. If she only lasts ten seconds of ignoring her before destroying everything, wait nine seconds before giving praise and a treat, then keep pushing the envelope.

You pretty much want her thought process to be, "what, again? I don't care anymore", instrad of anxiety whilst sitting in the jeep.

Or ignore everything above, but learn and follow another training regimen, rigorously. There are many paths, but it's all time, repetition, and effort.

Sorry to sound pedantic, but I've seen/know too many dogs that are, "just like that", or "can't be changed", that decrease the quality of life for owner, animal, and everyone else involved.

Hope you are able to enjoy many fun rides with your dog in the future. But stay the heck away from me, Little Dog has leash-aggression issues.
Thanks - I appreciate the great advice. Good food for thought. I hadn’t considered just hanging out in the Jeep with her in the driveway. She does respond to treat rewards when learning new behavior. Definitely worth the effort! Again, thanks for commenting. 👍🏻

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BJACK

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Is that a Dachshund and Miniature Pinscher mix? Maybe some Basset or something in there? Looks like ready to catch a rabbit or eat a badger.

Wanted to elevate the dog bucket too for extra storage, or to stick an ice pack under the Little Dog's butt in the summer, but he's too fat. Good option for smaller dogs though.

Did you bolt that radio bracket right into the plastic cover of the transmission tunnel?,
She's a Hunt Terrier, which is a smooth haired black and tan shorty jack russell. She's a ball of energy and fearless. I just bolted the radio to the plastic.
 

LittleDog

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Thanks - I appreciate the great advice. Good food for thought. I hadn’t considered just hanging out in the Jeep with her in the driveway. She does respond to treat rewards when learning new behavior. Definitely worth the effort! Again, thanks for commenting. 👍🏻

F6A27063-BDA1-43F4-85E3-C3D6FF51D0B1.jpeg
Thanks - I appreciate the great advice. Good food for thought. I hadn’t considered just hanging out in the Jeep with her in the driveway. She does respond to treat rewards when learning new behavior. Definitely worth the effort! Again, thanks for commenting. 👍🏻

F6A27063-BDA1-43F4-85E3-C3D6FF51D0B1.jpeg
Good, solid-looking dog there, even if not very amused by your antics. She should look happier, she's had a vaccine shot!

I might be biased, as I prefer it when dogs are large enough to not accidentally die when you squish them wrong.

Sorry again if I sound pedantic, but Little Dog was just bitten again by an ill-trained, known dog. Basically, the keys to curing anxiety/fear in dogs are usually desensitization, repetition, and boredom.

E.g., if they're afraid of thunder or fireworks, don't coddle and hold them. Instead, notice when lightning or a firework burst flashes happen, then say 'ka-pow!' or 'bang!', or something to distract/prepare them/get their attention. As soon as the sound hits, quickly give them a high-quality treat and praise. Always be ready to train a dog during its first Fourth of July or fireworks show. Repeat until they don't care about loud noise, and are slightly annoyed whenever you poke them to alert for loud noises.

If a dog is "afraid" or "anxious" in a certain situation, train them by putting them in the location/situation/carrier you've chosen, then practice just calmly hanging out around them for a while, as the unhappy situation occurs.

Pretend to ignore, or even enjoy the situation, but give treats and praise as soon as they calm down or do anything rather than freak out. Slowly increase duration.

Great excuse to buy jeep parts too. Have the dog around as you install; yell at them a bit when they wander too far, ignore anxiety, but reward calm and mellowness with praise and a treat; they're smart, they'll learn. Eventually they should understand that the jeep is a safe place, and become normal, sleepy dogs in its presence.

There are too many training regimens to name; feel free to ignore me completely. Choose your own path, the most important thing is to find a method, and repeat with consistency.

Hope to play with your dog on the trails!
 

Black Jeep Convertible

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I keep a set of these dog bungee seat buckles in the map pockets. Perfect for adjusting it just long enough so they can stick their head out but not climb out. https://amzn.to/3ylz2IH You can either use the belt buckle or the child seat anchors.
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and use a harness, not a collar
 

LittleDog

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She's a Hunt Terrier, which is a smooth haired black and tan shorty jack russell. She's a ball of energy and fearless. I just bolted the radio to the plastic.
Neat dog. No squirrels or chipmunks bothering you, for sure.

The "shorty" bit threw me off. Never heard the term "Hunt Terrier" before, but just looked it up. Makes sense, but aren't those types if small game hunters all 'hunt terriers' of some sort? That carrier seems pretty great for her.

I dig those feet. Figure she's trying to match your jeep tires in traction.

Certainly seems more attentive than LittleDog, anyways. Would definitely kick his fat, weenie butt.
 

DrBob

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She sits up front. Too much gear in the rear of the JL. Bartact seat covers.
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Ricootje0311

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If the top is off we have our dog on the second row with a ruffwear car harness . If the top is on she is in the boot of the car, I’ve installed a barrier by Travall. It’s an all steel fence which bolts down with the roof bolts. I’m the boot we have just a weathertech cargo mat with a blanket for her.
We’ve got the smittybilt GEAR seat covers front and rear. So if it’s wet or so it’s easy to clean.
 

omnitonic

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Foofy has gotten to old to make it into the throat-high bed of my truck, and I can't pick her ass up, so I switched her to riding in the back seats, accessible via suicide doors. When I got a Jeep, I got a four-door just for her, and I kept doing what she's already used to. I got the most highly recommended hammock on Amazon, but she has already cut through it in a couple of places. I will eventually shop for an upgrade.

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She can get in there by herself the first time. After that, she puts her front paws up, and I have to lift her butt. We've kind of got this worked out now. Foofy loves to ride. LOVES to ride. She can tell when it's my day off, and as soon as I let her out, she sits beside her door and just looks up at me, expectantly.

This dog loves to ride, and she's a chick magnet. Too bad Daddy is too awkward with girls to actually make any use of that fact. At least I get to look at a lot of cute girls while they pet my dog. That's cheaper anyway.
 

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She can get in there by herself the first time. After that, she puts her front paws up, and I have to lift her butt.
My dog does this too. She's always so excited to go for a ride but she's getting old and has had surgery on both her knees so she just puts her front paws up and gives me the sad puppy dog eyes until I help her the rest of the way.

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Grooster

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I keep a set of these dog bungee seat buckles in the map pockets. Perfect for adjusting it just long enough so they can stick their head out but not climb out. https://amzn.to/3ylz2IH You can either use the belt buckle or the child seat anchors.
1621310373934.png

and use a harness, not a collar
Excellent! Thanks for the tip!
 

Cappy

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I have a working dog with many training hours and over $6000 invested in him. He is also a pet when not working or training. Way to much to risk him getting messed up in an accident so he stays crated in the car. We have a one dog at a time rule and I definitely am not ready to deal with a new puppy or worse, a crippled dog.

During my younger and more vulnerable years, I had a 10 month old lab. I took him training a few miles away in my GF's mini pickup. On the way back I had him strapped in with leashes thinking he was secure. Plus he was well trained and would never jump out.

Anyway, somehow he got loose of one of the leashes, had enough slack in another and went over the edge of the truck bed, hit the ground and bounced back in the truck bed.

He was pretty messed up. After all said and done after a few thousand in vet bills he had nerve damage in front leg and his and my hunting days were over until he aged out and I got a replacement dog year latel

Lesson learned.

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kbarbosa86

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Guess it depends on how big your dog is. My Lily is about 13lbs lol. She rides in the back seat in her own car seat/bed (got from Quadratrec). She is harnessed at all times as you can see in the pics, and the harness is connected to a seat belt tether that is locked into the seat belt receiver in the Jeep. I do give her access to the window to stand up and what not. This has seemed to work for us for years now. My girl is big on having "her place" in each of our cars. She is now trained to where it doesn't matter whos car it is, she will go sit behind the drivers seat and do what we call "paws up" which simply means she sits up so I can put her legs in the harness. Or she sits on the bumper...lol j/k.

I can't speak too much in regards to large dogs, but my mom has a standard poodle (about 60lbs) and she is harnessed as well only hers fastens to the seat belt like a human would wear it allowing her to sit up and move.

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