rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
For context, I'm retired, drive short hops only, and therefore never trigger a passive regen. The Jeep has 10,600 miles.

A few months ago my Jeep was regening about twice as often as usual and the DPF%s were bouncing around erratically, as opposed to increasing 1% at time. I took it to the dealer, they performed a forced regen, and my issues cleared up completely - frankly, I was surprised. But...I don't like going to the dealer unless there's a gun to my head.

So...fast-forward to this morning. I unpacked my new Foxwell NT510 Elite ($170 after rebate on Amazon), did a quick setup, and gave it a go.
  • Plug the scanner into the OBD (engine and key off)
  • Push the Jeep's start button twice to get to "run"
  • Allowed the scanner to "find" my VIN.
  • I navigated to the regen command. Don't recall the exact sequence of buttons, but it was intuitive. [Remember the Alfaobd intiminated me; this did not.]
  • Started the engine
  • Activated the regen on the scanner

The rpms raised to 2,500 and stayed there for 19 minutes, and then the engine returned to idle. My soot level was initially only at 50%; at 80% it may have taken longer. Unfortunately, the scanner now occupied the OBD slot so I was unable to monitor soot percentage progress and exhaust temperatures via my iDash. I switched off the ignition, replaced the scanner with my iDash cable, and, voila, DPF was sitting at 8%.

This was a stationary forced regen, not one that required driving.

I was originally going to use Alfaobd on a Windows PC (I don't have an Android device), but the instructions were intimidating, and I wanted a unit that I could keep in my glovebox.

 
Last edited:

FarmerJenn

Member
First Name
Jenn
Joined
Oct 14, 2022
Threads
0
Messages
6
Reaction score
25
Location
Middle Tennessee
Vehicle(s)
2023 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon- 3.0L V6 EcoDiesel
Occupation
Crop Insurance Agent & Farmer
Thanks for posting this! I'm picking up my '23 JLURD on Saturday and have the same issue of a short in-town commute to work with seasonal long haul interstate trips.
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
Thanks for posting this! I'm picking up my '23 JLURD on Saturday and have the same issue of a short in-town commute to work with seasonal long haul interstate trips.
Two best (Ecodiesel-centric) mods: a throttle enhancer (Pedal Monster or Pedal Commander) and a Scangauge (or iDash). Many of us have them, especially the gauge. The gauge should have been OE.
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
Could pick up an OBD splitter if you were wanting to monitor the soot %.
Good point. I would only need to plug the splitter in when I was using the scanner.
 


Wrangler man

Well-Known Member
First Name
Howard
Joined
Aug 24, 2019
Threads
0
Messages
276
Reaction score
239
Location
Palm Springs
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLUAD
For context, I'm retired, drive short hops only, and therefore never trigger a passive regen. The Jeep has 10,600 miles.

A few months ago my Jeep was regening about twice as often as usual and the DPF%s were bouncing around erratically, as opposed to increasing 1% at time. I took it to the dealer, they performed a forced regen, and my issues cleared up completely - frankly, I was surprised. But...I don't like going to the dealer unless there's a gun to my head.

So...fast-forward to this morning. I unpacked my new Foxwell NT510 Elite ($170 after rebate on Amazon), did a quick setup, and gave it a go.
  • Plug the scanner into the OBD (engine and key off)
  • Push the Jeep's start button twice to get to "run"
  • Allowed the scanner to "find" my VIN.
  • I navigated to the regen command. Don't recall the exact sequence of buttons, but it was intuitive. [Remember the Alfaobd intiminated me; this did not.]
  • Started the engine
  • Activated the regen on the scanner

The rpms raised to 2,500 and stayed there for 19 minutes, and then the engine returned to idle. My soot level was initially only at 50%; at 80% it may have taken longer. Unfortunately, the scanner now occupied the OBD slot so I was unable to monitor soot percentage progress and exhaust temperatures via my iDash. I switched off the ignition, replaced the scanner with my iDash cable, and, voila, DPF was sitting at 8%.

This was a stationary forced regen, not one that required driving.

I was originally going to use Alfaobd on a Windows PC (I don't have an Android device), but the instructions were intimidating, and I wanted a unit that I could keep in my glovebox.
So strange that you never experience or see "passive regens" occurring. On my EcoDiesel consistently all the time. On a regular basis. Whether on short trips, around town or long drives.
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
So strange that you never experience or see "passive regens" occurring. On my EcoDiesel consistently all the time. On a regular basis. Whether on short trips, around town or long drives.
My exhaust temperature never seems to get above 750 degrees (except during active regens), and it's not like I live in a cold climate. The upside is that I never have any over-heating issues.

Go figure.

When you mention passive regens, are you seeing meaningful downward movement, or just a degree or two, here and there?

Good news is that it took 10K miles to require a forced regen, and now I can do them at home - or, more importantly, on the side of the road, if the DPF acts up.

And...yes, Pentastar owners, it's an extra maintenance step, but your Jeeps won't pull a house off its foundation. :)
 
Last edited:

TX_Ovrlnd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Threads
3
Messages
1,724
Reaction score
3,448
Location
TX
Vehicle(s)
'22 Zilver JLURD
Occupation
freethinker
My exhaust temperature never seems to get above 750 degrees (except during active regens), and it's not like I live in a cold climate. The upside is that I never have any over-heating issues.

Go figure.

When you mention passive regens, are you seeing meaningful downward movement, or just a degree or two, here and there?

Good news is that it took 10K miles to require a forced regen, and now I can do them at home - or, more importantly, on the side of the road, if the DPF acts up.

And...yes, Pentastar owners, it's an extra maintenance step, but your Jeeps won't pull a house off it's foundation. :)
My passive regens act more like active regens, it's a full 80% to 8% clean but the iDash clearly shows the computer in passive mode. I've only seen active push to the iDash one time when I turned off the Wrangler as it was just about to start a regen. These computers are so wonky.
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
Did you ever try an FBC?
I googled, but all I came up with Foundation for Blind Children. Roy, what's an FBC? [I'm sure it will be embarrassingly obvious when you tell me]
 


TX_Ovrlnd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Threads
3
Messages
1,724
Reaction score
3,448
Location
TX
Vehicle(s)
'22 Zilver JLURD
Occupation
freethinker
I googled, but all I came up with Foundation for Blind Children. Roy, what's an FBC? [I'm sure it will be embarrassingly obvious when you tell me]
Click the link, Fuel Borne Catalyst. Helps with burning off the soot.
 

Compression-Ignition

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roy
Joined
Nov 12, 2019
Threads
16
Messages
857
Reaction score
937
Location
Montana
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLUR 3.0 Diesel, 2020 6.7L F350
FBC (Fuel Born Catalyst)
I use Better Diesel, but there are many others to choose from. I would try one and see what it does for you. If it cuts your regen times down, you‘ll know it works. If all of a sudden you start to see some passive regeneration when you never did before, you’ll know it works. If nothing seems to change it wasn’t a bank breaker just to see.

I’ve said this before in other threads, but I think anyone who doesn’t see regular Highway use for at least 20 minute stretches should use an FBC. Keeps all the emissions stuff happy. Or at least it has for me.
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
I'm curious: for those that have driving practices that support passive regens, does the DPF% drop below 8%, or is 8% the floor?
 
OP
OP
rickinAZ

rickinAZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Threads
201
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
3,652
Location
Phoenix
Vehicle(s)
2021 Rubicon Diesel
Occupation
Retired CFO. Mayo Clinic volunteer.
FBC (Fuel Born Catalyst)
I use Better Diesel, but there are many others to choose from. I would try one and see what it does for you. If it cuts your regen times down, you‘ll know it works. If all of a sudden you start to see some passive regeneration when you never did before, you’ll know it works. If nothing seems to change it wasn’t a bank breaker just to see.

I’ve said this before in other threads, but I think anyone who doesn’t see regular Highway use for at least 20 minute stretches should use an FBC. Keeps all the emissions stuff happy. Or at least it has for me.
Thanks Roy. Great recommendation. Can FBC be used on conjunction with Hot Shots Secret?
 

Compression-Ignition

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roy
Joined
Nov 12, 2019
Threads
16
Messages
857
Reaction score
937
Location
Montana
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLUR 3.0 Diesel, 2020 6.7L F350
I'm curious: for those that have driving practices that support passive regens, does the DPF% drop below 8%, or is 8% the floor?
I’m pretty sure 8% is the floor. IIRC I’ve seen less, but it only lasts a moment. Same with my Powerstroke, the floor of that one is like 20, but it will go to 11 for a minute or two and then snap back to 20 and climb slow.

They never show zero. When I tow a good load say 15k plus the Powerstroke will passive regen and hold at like 3-5. But never touches zero. I think it’s all a calculated algorithm type deal. Not like an old school float in a gas tank that reads a physical level.

 

ATO4x4
 
Top