Speedflate air up/down system is legit!

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LostWoods

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@LostWoods are you sure? If used properly and For its intended purpose with regulators set up properly I don’t see how you would get some kind of over pressure problem. Can the system be overloaded? Of course, just like everything else. Using the right tool for the job and some common sense goes a long way. Would a 150 psi hose make you feel better using a CO2 tank with far more pressure than that in it? They all need some kind of regulator.
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If you trust the customer to set up the regulators properly then yes, it will be fine, but you'll still be over 100psi if doing only 2 tires on a high-flow compressor or if doing higher pressure tires without something limiting input pressure. As I mentioned above, the customer cannot be trusted to implement failsafes, you need to build them into your product to avoid court time.
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Speedflate

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@LostWoods It's all good. I understand what you are getting at. Some one could totally overload the system. During normal use (airing tires down and up from 10 to 35 PSI) it should be perfectly safe. I did want to address your points again though.

The first point of load range E tires and using CO2 at full power. Yes of course that would end badly. 400 PSI through the system is not a good idea. Using a Power Tank and setting the regulator at 100 PSI would be perfectly safe as you could not exceed 100 PSI.

The second point of exceeding 100 PSI on the 2x system is referring to having my twin ARB with air tank pre filled to 130 PSI and then connecting it to the system. As I demonstrated with the 4x system we only hit 82 PSI. You are correct on this. Doing the same method with the 2x system would have over 100 PSI in the lines for a short time. However this could be avoided even on the 2x system by not preloading the system opening the valve before the system gets over 100 PSI.

When you are dealing with CO2 systems though that are capable of putting out 400 PSI even if the hose was rated at 200 PSI they could still overload the system.
 

LostWoods

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I think the issue is that using CO2 at 100PSI mostly negates the entire purpose of using CO2 and the "normal use" scenario for Power Tank (at least on mine) is that it has the "tire" zone between 200 and 250PSI. So your expectation needs to be that someone is not going to read your instructions or warnings and uses their PT as usual and you'll definitely be seeing dangerous pressures in your system. Using 300psi hoses would fix this as going above 250psi would not only be violating what you recommend but power tank as well.

I understand that you are targeting the Jeep market but people off-road other things too. Super Duty trucks were my point because people have them out on the dunes all the time and I can absolutely see someone using theirs to air up their tow vehicle after a day out with the Jeep. Even an F-150 might be airing up to 50 or 60psi (because again, customer is the idiot and the sidewall says 65psi on it!) which will exceed 100psi line pressure even with all four connected.

It's all about CYA and especially so when you're a small company where a single lawsuit can bury you. You can't expect the customer to implement the failsafes and when you expect the customer to modify behavior from an entirely standard use case to prevent damage to your product, you're opening yourself up when it's extremely easy to show an easily fixable flaw in your product that can also prevent that damage/injury.
 
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I think the issue is that using CO2 at 100PSI mostly negates the entire purpose of using CO2 and the "normal use" scenario for Power Tank (at least on mine) is that it has the "tire" zone between 200 and 250PSI. So your expectation needs to be that someone is not going to read your instructions or warnings and uses their PT as usual and you'll definitely be seeing dangerous pressures in your system. Using 300psi hoses would fix this as going above 250psi would not only be violating what you recommend but power tank as well.

I understand that you are targeting the Jeep market but people off-road other things too. Super Duty trucks were my point because people have them out on the dunes all the time and I can absolutely see someone using theirs to air up their tow vehicle after a day out with the Jeep. Even an F-150 might be airing up to 50 or 60psi (because again, customer is the idiot and the sidewall says 65psi on it!) which will exceed 100psi line pressure even with all four connected.

It's all about CYA and especially so when you're a small company where a single lawsuit can bury you. You can't expect the customer to implement the failsafes and when you expect the customer to modify behavior from an entirely standard use case to prevent damage to your product, you're opening yourself up when it's extremely easy to show an easily fixable flaw in your product that can also prevent that damage/injury.
Well you are totally answering my question about if your sure or not. When I looked at that equation, I knew immediately that it was over my head, so I threw it out there with some “sarcasm”. I Know how to, and have always used a regulator for its intended purpose so I have no problem using it with a CO2 tank. With that said, what you are saying makes perfect sense about the need for TJ to maybe look into making sure he’s got his bases covered. I still feel totally comfortable using mine and adjusting my regulator, but I also know a lot of people use a fixed regulator.

Make sure to CYA TJ.
 

LostWoods

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Well you are totally answering my question about if your sure or not. When I looked at that equation, I knew immediately that it was over my head, so I threw it out there with some “sarcasm”. I Know how to, and have always used a regulator for its intended purpose so I have no problem using it with a CO2 tank. With that said, what you are saying makes perfect sense about the need for TJ to maybe look into making sure he’s got his bases covered. I still feel totally comfortable using mine and adjusting my regulator, but I also know a lot of people use a fixed regulator.

Make sure to CYA TJ.
Yeah that's beyond me as well... I just have experience wrenching and setting up shop equipment with varying degrees of pressure and flow requirements so I know enough to be dangerous and know that you don't fuck around with things like this. 100PSI doesn't mean it will blow when you cross it but much like steering components on a Jeep, going beyond intended use fatigues over time and can cause catastrophic issues. All it would take is one hose blowing loose while someone's kid is walking by and the company would cease to exist.

And like I said, dude has a great product going otherwise... The fittings are the best way to do it because it makes the system serviceable (press-fit never seem to work well twice) so some 300psi hoses (and a gauge that can at least not break at that pressure) and this would probably be the best one on the market at anywhere near that price.
 

Speedflate

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I’m going to be adding a 100 PSI fixed regulator as an option. This seems like the best solution for now. I will be testing it this weekend.
 
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Foggy47

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^ You are likely right about the need to address these high pressure issues. Not sure.....but a "warning label" may be adequate for use with the existing system.......and offering a high pressure system as an alternative? Not sure the price difference in hoses......but I assume it will run the price up for many of us that do not need it.

Might be a good question for a lawyer. I had a small manufacturing biz and made shooting accessories. Always was concerned about product liability......and insured for such. I did spend allot of money defending myself on patent issues. (I won.....but sometimes the costs dont make it feel like winning.)

In TJ's case it may be possible to get the proper warning language that "use with high pressure requires a regulator".......or "Not for use with pressures that exceed 100 PSI"......or some such thing.

I do know you do NOT want to sit in a court room with your lawyer at your side defending yourself in a lawsuit.
 
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Jabarsetti

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Finally had time to get out and use this thing!
Initial review: it works, aired down was normal speed and it worked. If you have actual air downtools I’m sure it’s much faster. But it works, dropped from 37 psi to 18/20 psi within about 5 mins. Air up pretty straight forward too not “faster but more convenient. My only issue @Speedflate is the gauge is anywhere from 2-5psi off of what the tpms is reading. When it first turns on it’s zero’d out but no matter what I do I can’t get it to show actual pressure on the digital gauge‍♂.
 

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Filled mine up today to 36 and my TPMS read 36 in the Jeep. Worked great and only wishing I would have had this for all my wheeling trips this past summer! The snow is starting to move into the mountains already.

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Foggy47

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I have the two-tire model of the Speed-flate.......and use it with a Smitty Built Compressor. Went on a run last Friday with six other guys.....all had somewhat different air-up / down gear. My set up was as fast and more easy than any others. Pretty happy with what I got for now. Perhaps one day I will go with an on-board compressor......but I am not ready to do that at this time. Too much else to do and I really have not seen an easy to install, good quality, affordable, on-board compressor for the JL..

Made a trip to Harbor Freight today.....and bought one of those fabric, open top tool totes (the larger size they offer - $34.00). My Smitty Built Compressor and the extension hose nesstle in the opening just right.......and the numerous side pockets hold the extra air tools and some commonly used screw drivers and pliers.....etc. AND....it will be hard to burn myself when moving the compressor about. There is room on all sides to allow the compressor to cool while operating.....yet I have a metal handle with a foam grip to easily move the compressor about.....even when hot. Pretty nice. Earlier I had wired my jeep for the QC Anderson 12 volt connections at my front bumper. No need to lift the hood. Everything is easy to connect and use. Quite happy with my air set up now.
 
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....the customer cannot be trusted to implement failsafes, you need to build them into your product to avoid court time.
A truer statement has never been written... We live in a land where gasoline and rat poison have to be labeled with bolded warnings telling people that the sustances are “not for human consumption”, and chainsaws and firearms come with warnings noting that misuse can “cause serious injury or death”. No kidding? Imagine the level of stupid that could benefit from such warnings!

Oh, and let’s not forget about that irritating “auto-park“ feature on newer Jeeps. We can’t even disable that with programmers anymore because, as it turns out, Americans can‘t be trusted to safely back up — even when they have help from reverse cameras and warning buzzers. Amazing...

The American legal system no longer assigns any personal responsibility to idiots who manage to injure themselves through Inexplicably improper use, so manufactures have to build products assuming the consumers will try to injure themselves. When you’re designing anything it helps to keep the “Darwin Awards” in mind. Common sense becomes less common every year.
 

Speedflate

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Got the stand alone pressure regulator on the website. This regulates the incoming flow to a steady 100 PSI for any one running high pressure systems. It works with any Speedflate system or can even be used with any air tool.

Pressure Regulator
 
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av8or

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Been using the heck out of mine!
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Hey @Speedflate I’m currently looking for a better bag for the system. I was thinking something like a tool bag that has a large opening that stays open. If you come up with an upgraded bag for an option, please let us know here. I’d buy one in a second.
 
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