Ripp Supercharger for 2018 3.6L JL Wrangler

  1. ThrillerR1

    ThrillerR1 Well-Known Member

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    I emailed Ripp to see if they had plans to create a kit for the 2018 3.6L. Response, "as soon as it is released we will begin production on the new JL"

    Never used their stuff but happy to hear they'll be showing the 3.6 some love.
     
  2. KaDeTime

    KaDeTime Well-Known Member

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    Yes this will probably be the best option for power as the 2.0 and diesel will be more expensive and bring less power then the supercharger
     
  3. Euro JEEP

    Euro JEEP Well-Known Member

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    If you wanna supercharge, I would go for the edelbrock root supercharger instead of the spool charger from RIPP.
    RIPP is very good in daily driver and highway situation but needs to build up power so has a bit of lag.
    Edelbrock has a quicker response time but is a bigger install and you probably lose an mpg.
    Both add a lot of power!
     
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  4. Rockmaninoff

    Rockmaninoff Banned

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    I saw a video where Sprintex said they're developing one for the JL.

    Would definitely go for a positive displacement supercharger over a RIPP style centrifugal one. No matter how much RIPP stomps their feet about it, a centrifugal supercharger doesn't provide boost characteristics like a positive displacemnt unit. Just look at Jaguar, Land Rover, Lotus and let's not forget the Dodge Hellcats.
     
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  5. AZCrawl

    AZCrawl Well-Known Member

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    If I ever supercharge mine, it will be with Edelbrock. They do a much better job and replace your warranty that you void when adding it, if you are still under warranty.
     
  6. Rockmaninoff

    Rockmaninoff Banned

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    Not sure about your local laws but generally, to void factory warranty, you need to have broken something covered by factory warranty by adding or using a third party item. At least where I live, warranty is not provided at the discretion of manufacturers, dealers, etc.

    E.g. changing the wheels won't void your driveline's factory warranty automatically eventhough it affects your driveline directly. Adding aftermarket headlamps won't void your electronics warranty although you are replacing a factory part with a third party one. Same goes (again, check local laws) for fluids, filters, spark plugs and even superchargers.

    I can take my supercharged JKU to an official Jeep dealer and they will do the standard service and I can tell them not to touch the SC (they normally won't anyway).
     
  7. Bearded_Dragon

    Bearded_Dragon Well-Known Member

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    I disagree. This supercharger is about $6000-7500 (not including tune and IF you can install it yourself) so will probably be more expensive than a diesel and tune. The current Ecodiesel with tune puts it around 300hp and 540tq. With the revised Ecodiesel going into Wranglers I'm sure that number will bump up as well. I'm guessing the 2.0 will have more torque but less HP vs a supercharged 3.6.
     
  8. KaDeTime

    KaDeTime Well-Known Member

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    #8 Jan 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
    You are partially correct the price is list 5,962.96 with tune and I’m sure you can shop around for cheaper. Installation is very simple and most of the people that work on their jeep could do this as everything is included. This by itself is almost same as the Diesel JL option price based on the GC plus then you pay for more expensive fuel and engine maintenance. From there if you wanted to get the extra 100tq you quoted you would need engine work. Probably a good tune and new injectors would address this (already more expensive then RIPP + more expensive diesel fuel) taken that this will probably be illegal as you will modify the engine and its pollution numbers. I love Diesel that’s what I had in my last 3 cars/trucks but in my opinion the best “bang for the buck” would be the 3.6 with a supercharger whichever one is the best at the time .


    Let me know if you disagree with any of the numbers I stated cause I would also like to have a street legal powerfully drive line that I could buy.
     
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  9. Bearded_Dragon

    Bearded_Dragon Well-Known Member

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    The tune I mention adds 60hp and 118tq to 2014-2016 Ecodiesels, you won't need any injectors nor engine work to get a 3.0L to 500+tq as they already come with 420tq, plus Jeep stated the 2019 models will have 442tq. I have more confidence with a forged engine + boost vs stock 3.6+boost as well. I also was going to mention drivetrain, I don't know how stout the automatic is for 2.0/3.6 engines but the diesel is coming with it's own transmission, presumably to handle the torque, so that's another point for diesel in my book.

    For me low end torque matters more than HP and I agree with Rockmaninoff about centrifugal superchargers. If someone created a roots/screw supercharger, which excels at delivering low end torque, I'd really be stuck on which direction I'd go. Plus positive displacement superchargers sound amazing to me lol.

    Currently I still have no idea what engine I'll end up with for my 2019 Wrangler. I'm hoping Jeep offers a 3.0 for two door Wranglers and if so I'll be going that route. Otherwise by the time I place my order we'll all have a better idea how the 2.0 performs. I don't plan on adding FI or upping boost on whatever engine I get.
     
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  10. OP
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    ThrillerR1

    ThrillerR1 Well-Known Member

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    I'll toss in my 0.02. The diesel will have decent performance numbers, but I don't know if I can wait until August or later to drive one. The mentioned tuners are out there to boost the ecodiesel, but what I haven't been able to find out is if those numbers are reliant on supporting mods. Specifically removal of the DEF, DPF, Cats, etc. If that's the case, diesel wouldn't work for me. Firstly, I wouldn't want to drive a topless / doorless Jeep that has a strong "diesel" smell and puts out black smoke. Second, I wouldn't be able to pass Colorado diesel emissions. I plan to find a diesel Ram and see how it drives, should give me an idea how the Wrangler will drive.

    As to the differences between centrifugal and roots supercharges, I lean towards the centrifugal. It's true that centrifugal have to "spool" up with engine speed to make power and I like that characteristic. It means that at highway speeds you can have the increased power but at lower speeds, and when crawling, you're producing stock like levels of torque. Stock tiorque will hopefully keep everything nice and reliable when in low range. Not saying that one style supercharger is better than the other, I just think the centrifugal fits the Jeep better for how I intend to use it. Passing power when I want it, stock-ish driveability when I don't.
     
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  11. AZCrawl

    AZCrawl Well-Known Member

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    I want the opposite, a linear power curve that provides power when rock crawling or getting up ledges when you need some wheel spin.
     
  12. offcamber

    offcamber Well-Known Member

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    It largely depends on your dealer. Sure there is the Magnuson Moss act, which you are referring to, but some dealers will fight you. I've never had a problem at a dealer with a modified Jeep, but I know of plenty of cases of dealers doing what they want. I had a friend running 35's on his JK and when his transmission failed, the dealer denied the warranty claim because his "over sized tires" put undo strain on the transmission contributing to it's failure. I know of cases where lifts have been blamed for all sorts of issues. In my experience, if the dealer flags it, Jeep backs up the dealer almost every time. While the Magnuson Moss act provides those protections, if the dealer decides to deny you coverage due to modifications you would have to take them to court to fight it. They know that most people aren't going to go through the huge cost and ordeal of doing that.

    If you supercharge the engine and the engine or driveline fails, and the dealer attributes that to the supercharger, you will have to prove in court that it wasnt and can you really prove it?

     
  13. Rockmaninoff

    Rockmaninoff Banned

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    #13 Jan 9, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
    Allow me to add from my experience using my Sprintex supercharged 3.6 here... even the stock 3.6 is adequate for passing at highway speeds (see people's comments in 2012) and both positive displacement and centrifugal SCs add plenty more power on top to make passing easy if not surprising to you and the one being passed. So, while your argument is true in theory, passing is not an issue for either type but with a centrifugal SC you don't get the wheel spinning power down low which is also useful if you're heavy and you're in heavy traffic.


    All you need to do is take it to a 3rd party certified mechanic and they'll see what kind of a failure it was. If the driveshaft is twisted around or there's a bump on the underside of the hood shaped like a supercharger, then you're at fault, no doubt :) If it's the manufacturer's fault they might have to pay for the investigation (check local laws LOL) or otherwise you'd have done it anyway.

    At any rate, I wouldn't put any major engine mods on any new engine until the engine's properly broken-in with a few thousand on the ODO to eliminate manufacturing issues... unless it's a JDM Toyota :D
     
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  14. Iconoffroad

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    Hey guys. I actually have a sprintex SPS prototype system for the jeep JK. Im very close with the CEO and marketing director of sprintex. As a dealer I've install centrifugal (RIPP) and root (eldelbrock) systems, the roots style charger are actually really old technology. WWII planes had them. The cintrifugal style have to build boost because its more like a turbo which is the last thing you want on a jeep especialcially if your rock crawling. I chose the twin screw Style I.E. sprintex. It's male and female screws with less than 6 microns of clearance between the screws and housing so there is virtually no leakage and that means instant boost. SPRINTEX ALREADY HAS developed the system for the new 3.6 and are working on the tuning now. OURS will more than likely have one as soon as it' released or even before it' released as we were the test subject for the stage II SPS system. I will find out more info as soon as I speak with the CEO. And I will let you guys know cost and ETA on market availability as I think they are pushing to be first to the market for this system. I have installed over 60 of their systems and have never had a problem from the actual system. Mostly where problems are found is in the tuning, this would be with most companies. But customer service wise you will get no better than sprintex
     
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  15. TTEChris

    TTEChris Well-Known Member

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    Nice, my biggest deal is being able to keep the Manual transmission that I would lose by going with the Diesel. I agree that centrifugal style blowers are not what I would want on a Jeep. I want that instant torque down low, I just wonder how the factory clutch will handle it.
     
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