Reports/rumors: Serious accident at 2019 Easter Jeep Safari

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BumpyTrail

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I am curious as to why she was air evac if she did to sustain potentially life threatening injuries. I’ve been in medicine for a while and I have never had or even heard of a patient getting a helo ride for a fracture. There are complications from fracture that can threaten the limb but there really is no way to test for compartment syndrome in the field.
Anywhere outside the “Golden Hour” qualifies as a wilderness activity. The term “golden hour” refers to the amount of time it would hypothetically take from mechanism of injury to laying on an operating table in an appropriate trauma center (whichever level required). In “Wilderness Medical Training” you are specifically taught when to request evacuation. This involves taking and monitoring all vital signs. I would be willing to guarantee the patient showed signs of shock! Shock is an automatic evacuation!

Source: I am Solo Wilderness Medicine certified in Wilderness First Aid (WFA) and as a Wilderness First Responder (WFR). These courses are required for all medical care flight and search/rescue personnel. For anyone interested in “knowing” what to do if you find yourself in an emergency I highly recommend looking into these organizations:

https://soloschools.com/

https://www.heart.org/en/cpr

https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class

https://emergencycare.hsi.com/cpr-and-first-aid-courses

https://www.nols.edu/en/about/wilderness-medicine/
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TennesseePA

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Anywhere outside the “Golden Hour” qualifies as a wilderness activity. The term “golden hour” refers to the amount of time it would hypothetically take from mechanism of injury to laying on an operating table in an appropriate trauma center (whichever level required). In “Wilderness Medical Training” you are specifically taught when to request evacuation. This involves taking and monitoring all vital signs. I would be willing to guarantee the patient showed signs of shock! Shock is an automatic evacuation!

Source: I am Solo Wilderness Medicine certified in Wilderness First Aid (WFA) and as a Wilderness First Responder (WFR). These courses are required for all medical care flight and search/rescue personnel. For anyone interested in “knowing” what to do if you find yourself in an emergency I highly recommend looking into these organizations:

https://soloschools.com/

https://www.heart.org/en/cpr

https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class

https://emergencycare.hsi.com/cpr-and-first-aid-courses

https://www.nols.edu/en/about/wilderness-medicine/
I guess I need to be more clear what I am questioning. I know what is and is not a life threatening medical situation and when air evac is indicated. So since she was taken to a trauma center via air and according to he FB post she has already had two sx. So I am more inclined to think that is was a much more serious incident than the latest account.
 

Rural Applachia

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The home owners deck collapsed while I was walking on it. I fell over 20 feet down. I broke one ankle in 3 places and disclocated the other. The deck did not appear to be in bad condition; I thought. I had black and blue marks all over. and was hospitalized for 4 days. I knew the home owner. Until the hospital bill came I would never have thought I would get push back from the home owner. Then its like they never heard of me. I submitted the claim to my health provider BC/BS who paid the claim. They then filed suit against the home owner. Once that happened their insurance approached me about settleing for pain and suffering.
 

NoBigDeal

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I am curious as to why she was air evac if she did to sustain potentially life threatening injuries. I’ve been in medicine for a while and I have never had or even heard of a patient getting a helo ride for a fracture. There are complications from fracture that can threaten the limb but there really is no way to test for compartment syndrome in the field.
I'm not in medicine and have never been in medicine and even I know that there can be life threatening injuries from fractures and even dislocations on extremities. When I was a cop we air evaced a female in a vehicle accident whose only injury was to her left humorous. And the only way you could tell there was any injury to that was it looked like she had a cantaloupe as a bicep. She somehow severed the artery in her arm. I can easily see something similar happening being ran over twice(according to the last report) by a ~5000# vehicle.
 

DanW

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I have a Delorme (Garmin) Inreach satellite locator/communitor/emergency device. It costs about 36 bucks or so to activate it for a year, then you can get a monthly plan for as low as 14 bucks. In an emergency, you hit the SOS button and communicate with a center that will send rescue, if necessary. For something like 20 bucks, I was able to get $100,000 in insurance that covers search and medical evacuation (or just evacuation if there is no medical emergency.) I think that's pretty reasonable. I activated it and took it last October when I ran the Rimrocker and trails in Moab. The bonus is that you can send/receive text messages where there is no cell coverage and the plan I had updated my location every 10 minutes for family/friends with whom I shared a web link.

In a situation like this, that insurance would be nice to cover that helicopter ambulance ride. I'm sure rescue operations can add up to a pretty big bill in no time.
 

TennesseePA

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I'm not in medicine and have never been in medicine and even I know that there can be life threatening injuries from fractures and even dislocations on extremities. When I was a cop we air evaced a female in a vehicle accident whose only injury was to her left humorous. And the only way you could tell there was any injury to that was it looked like she had a cantaloupe as a bicep. She somehow severed the artery in her arm. I can easily see something similar happening being ran over twice(according to the last report) by a ~5000# vehicle.
That’s what I was saying. The latest account of the event was somewhat of a benign description of the mechanism of injury. Although I am sure it sucks getting rolled over by an aired down JL in and of itself doesn’t seem like a life threatening situation. My whole point is that something bad happened and whoever made the call to EMS communicated in well enough that the person in charge decided on helo evac. I’ve seen more than a few patients leave and arrive to the ED via helicopter and none of them have been a simple closed fracture. I am in primary care now and trying to get back into Emergency Medicine. I have applied to two Level 1 Centers in the past couple weeks.
 

NoBigDeal

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That’s what I was saying. The latest account of the event was somewhat of a benign description of the mechanism of injury. Although I am sure it sucks getting rolled over by an aired down JL in and of itself doesn’t seem like a life threatening situation. My whole point is that something bad happened and whoever made the call to EMS communicated in well enough that the person in charge decided on helo evac. I’ve seen more than a few patients leave and arrive to the ED via helicopter and none of them have been a simple closed fracture. I am in primary care now and trying to get back into Emergency Medicine. I have applied to two Level 1 Centers in the past couple weeks.
I'm by no means trying to question your expertise. I've just dealt with it personally. The last bit of info we got here wasn't from anyone there. They were reporting what someone else told them that more than likely heard it from someone else. I can totally understand an air evac in a situation like this where real help is many hours away. When I experienced it first hand there was a hospital around 5 miles away, but if if she would have been taken there she would have been transferred, because that hospital wasn't equipped to handle any significant trauma. The EMS on scene just skipped a step by bypassing the local county hospital.
 

TennesseePA

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I wasn't trying to throw my experience around. The story about me trying to get into a Level 1 center ED is more of a point of pride. There aren't many of those around. And I read the lady's FB post and she had already been to the OR twice to get "put back together" so I am in no way saying she didn't need air evacuation because the obviously did.

Glad you guys are smart I've been on my phone and I just noticed I need to up my proofreading game!
 

SteadyC

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I guess I need to be more clear what I am questioning. I know what is and is not a life threatening medical situation and when air evac is indicated. So since she was taken to a trauma center via air and according to he FB post she has already had two sx. So I am more inclined to think that is was a much more serious incident than the latest account.
Nobody said it wasn’t serious. Absolutely serious. Just what I heard, was the initial injury was determined to not be life threatening, not anything more, like that additional circumstances couldn’t become threatening life shock.
 

NoBigDeal

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Not only do I not have any medical background I'm also pretty horrible with most technology. If I was trying to have conversations on my phone instead of a computer, a chimpanzee throwing crayons at a keyboard would have better communication skills than I do texting. The sad part is I'm only 40, but damn does technology hate me.
 

mike_b_81

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I have a Delorme (Garmin) Inreach satellite locator/communitor/emergency device. It costs about 36 bucks or so to activate it for a year, then you can get a monthly plan for as low as 14 bucks. In an emergency, you hit the SOS button and communicate with a center that will send rescue, if necessary. For something like 20 bucks, I was able to get $100,000 in insurance that covers search and medical evacuation (or just evacuation if there is no medical emergency.) I think that's pretty reasonable. I activated it and took it last October when I ran the Rimrocker and trails in Moab. The bonus is that you can send/receive text messages where there is no cell coverage and the plan I had updated my location every 10 minutes for family/friends with whom I shared a web link.

In a situation like this, that insurance would be nice to cover that helicopter ambulance ride. I'm sure rescue operations can add up to a pretty big bill in no time.
Cabelas and Bass Pro Shop has a deal going on the Spot Gen 3, 50% off mail in rebate for the spot, plus 50% off instant yearly activation. It can track down to 5 minutes, can send canned messages, can send a break down message or send the SOS message. I got it specifically for my Colorado trip this summer, that way my wife and mom can track my trip and the peace of mind if something happens.
 

rustyshakelford

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That’s what I was saying. The latest account of the event was somewhat of a benign description of the mechanism of injury. Although I am sure it sucks getting rolled over by an aired down JL in and of itself doesn’t seem like a life threatening situation. My whole point is that something bad happened and whoever made the call to EMS communicated in well enough that the person in charge decided on helo evac. I’ve seen more than a few patients leave and arrive to the ED via helicopter and none of them have been a simple closed fracture. I am in primary care now and trying to get back into Emergency Medicine. I have applied to two Level 1 Centers in the past couple weeks.
I’m all about a conservative approach to air transport due to cost and availability but for this I absolutely agree with the decision to fly. As mentioned earlier, the distance to a road is several hours and then you have the transport time to a faculty that can accommodate. In Moab you’re in the middle of nowhere when it comes to advanced levels of care. They didn’t know the severity besides I’m assuming a fx of the leg. Could be a tib/fib, could’ve been the femur and concerns of damaging the femoral? We don’t know since we weren’t there. If I had been and made the call, I would’ve given our gps coordinated and request a life flight or whatever helicopter medicvac was available and secured an LZ based strictly off the mechanism and distance to definitive care

Brett
 

Martindfletcher

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I’m all about a conservative approach to air transport due to cost and availability but for this I absolutely agree with the decision to fly. As mentioned earlier, the distance to a road is several hours and then you have the transport time to a faculty that can accommodate. In Moab you’re in the middle of nowhere when it comes to advanced levels of care. They didn’t know the severity besides I’m assuming a fx of the leg. Could be a tib/fib, could’ve been the femur and concerns of damaging the femoral? We don’t know since we weren’t there. If I had been and made the call, I would’ve given our gps coordinated and request a life flight or whatever helicopter medicvac was available and secured an LZ based strictly off the mechanism and distance to definitive care

Brett
Well said, the femoral artery is a huge risk without people around that know what they are doing, Adding a tourniquet to the med kit after hearing about this one.
 
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