Rear Trackbar Relocation Bracket

engineXI

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I don't see that all manufacturers include this type of bracket in their lift kits. RockKrawler has it and a couple of others. What is this part all about and why would it be required on some kits and not others?

 

BDinTX

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Yellow Cake Kid

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I occasionally think about adding a Synergy Jeep JL / JLU Rear Track Bar Relocation Bracket to the Metacloak Game-Changer 3.5" lift on my 2020 JLU Rubicon, but I have not thought through the details regarding what I might give up to gain the benefits.

It seems like there is some loss of potential for up travel, and I wonder how my current bump stop configuration compares with what would be required if a relocation bracket was inserted above the current mount.

When I drive slowly on the notoriously bad pavement found on our downtown streets I feel like I can perceive how the lift impacts the roll center. I imagine that I can sense the rear end lurch in a side to side motion as the solid axle distributes the road feel across the chassis. When I am off road on the trails, I can not sense this issue. I assume that my expectations are calibrated differently when I am on a paved street or off road path. It seems to be more obvious on the rough and hard pavement.

The effect may also contribute to my heartfelt dislike of washboard.

I think I would install a Rear Track Bar Relocation Bracket if I could learn more about the impact on up travel in context with my Jeep's setup.
 

Some Random Guy

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My amateur research suggests that matching front and back is a good idea. So if you raise a trackbar mount on one axle, you should in the other. I’ve also read that keeping the trackbar and drag link parallel helps avoid bumpsteer. I have a flipped draglink, so both my trackbars are adjusted with brackets rather than longer trackbars. My flipped draglink limits uptravel, I’m on 39’s though so it doesn’t bother me. If I were doing it all over again, I might go adjustables and 37’s to try and keep the Jeep lower.
 


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engineXI

engineXI

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The relocation bracket is supposed to improve handling by bringing vehicle roll center up closer to the vehicle center of gravity. I’m a fan of AEV, they have a good document on lifts here:

https://www.aev-conversions.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/AEV_12ThingsToKnowAboutSuspension.pdf
Thanks. I read through this document and there was some good information. I am not sure I gleaned enough to understand 'why/why not' a relocation bracket. Is it to say that the bracket allows to achieve the actual best location when a longer bar would not suffice?

I could understand if a kit did not offer an adjustable track bar that they could include instead a relocation bracket, but that doesn't seem the case in the RK kit anyways.
 
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engineXI

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Because money
Does it mean that companies including the bracket are looking to get a few extra bucks because they include it? Or does it mean that all kits SHOULD have the bracket but to lower their retail price point to attempt a competitive advantage that they do not include it?

As I have been looking at the various kits over the past few months I am starting to take a position that they are really mostly the same. It is mostly a matter of the bushings/joints and if they include things like track bars, control arms, and sway links.

I mean, is there really any big difference between, the control arms and track bars of rock krawler, clayton, teraflex, metalcloak?

I have seen plenty of reviews and comparisons of those kits but they all have different shocks and springs. Isn't that the major point between the different companies?
 

redsyphon

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An attempt to keep stock geometry.

When you lift, you're messing with your angles for things like track bars, control arms, etc.

These can be corrected in various ways including adjustable bars and arms, but the angles are still changed in those instances.

So, while adjustable length parts can re-center the axle and correct things such as caster, etc.; they don't always correct the up/down travel angles as an example for control arms. That's a reason you see short vs. Long arm kits out there...

A bracket can move the track bar back to a flatter more stock angle and re-center the axle at the same time using OE parts if designed and installed right.
 

Headbarcode

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I occasionally think about adding a Synergy Jeep JL / JLU Rear Track Bar Relocation Bracket to the Metacloak Game-Changer 3.5" lift on my 2020 JLU Rubicon, but I have not thought through the details regarding what I might give up to gain the benefits.

It seems like there is some loss of potential for up travel, and I wonder how my current bump stop configuration compares with what would be required if a relocation bracket was inserted above the current mount.

When I drive slowly on the notoriously bad pavement found on our downtown streets I feel like I can perceive how the lift impacts the roll center. I imagine that I can sense the rear end lurch in a side to side motion as the solid axle distributes the road feel across the chassis. When I am off road on the trails, I can not sense this issue. I assume that my expectations are calibrated differently when I am on a paved street or off road path. It seems to be more obvious on the rough and hard pavement.

The effect may also contribute to my heartfelt dislike of washboard.

I think I would install a Rear Track Bar Relocation Bracket if I could learn more about the impact on up travel in context with my Jeep's setup.
I've got the 3.5" Gamechanger on my JLUR and synergy brackets on both ends of my rear track bar. It doesn't at all limit uptravel. My rear sway bar was the only thing that was limiting it, as the bar was hitting the bottom of the frame. Antirock fixed that. After a year of having the relocation bracket, I've yet to find a downside from it.

This is an older pic. I more recently swapped out that synergy rear bar and finally installed the Metalcloak bar that I've been sitting on. The new bar clears just as well, of not better.
20210329_145532.jpg
20210329_145342.jpg
20210329_145422.jpg
20210329_145447.jpg


The synergy relocation bracket is the priciest of the lot. It's added benefit over the others is it doesn't rely on a gusset and ubolt that attaches to the axle tube. That would interfere with the Metalcloak rear diff skid, or any other brand skid that attaches to the axle tube.

Except the pricier synergy one, the other brand brackets are typically more cost efficient than a quality adjustable track bar. For less money spent, a relocated factory bar will get the rear axle closer to center and helps to reduce head toss when going over bumps because of the raised rear roll center. An adjustable bar mounted to the factory bracket will allow the axle to be perfectly centered, the bushings will be of much better quality, and the stronger bar will do a far better job of next flexing under the higher leverage forces that accompanies a lift and larger tires. Doing both, as pictured above, is all upswing. The stronger bar, better bushings, raised roll center, and perfectly centered axle will equal a more solid, stable, and planted feel. That all domino affects to the added plus of an improved steering feel. Less rear axle to frame/body movement means less micro corrections to keep the Jeep aiming straight. At least that's the results I got with mine.

I've found that by splurging on the supporting parts, I've been able to more than offset the increased forces of the higher lift and larger tires. No exaggeration, my Jeep rides and handles better now than when it came out of the factory. And I never had any complaints back when itbwas stock. Without even bringing it up, every person that's ridden with me has commented that it doesn't at all drive like a tall vehicle with big tires.

20190827_084948_resized(1).jpg
20211014_133132.jpg
 

Yellow Cake Kid

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It is good to learn that the rear track bar relocation bracket doesn't impede your up travel. It looks like you have 3" of bump stop blocks on the axle, which is what I have as well, but I have the Rocksport shocks that don't compress as much as your 6-paks. It seems like the 6-paks would not need as much bump stop, and the axle could travel further upward if the body work was ready to clear the tires.

When I look at the rear track bar mount on my axle it seems like there is a whole bunch of space available for up travel.

I am interested in the relocation bracket's ability to marginally improve the rear end handling in the circumstances I described above.

If I do purchase and install the relocation bracket I will continue to appreciate the strength of Metalcloak solid steel track bar that I already have installed even if the relocation bracket tends to negate the need for the track bar's adjustable length features.

Question: @Headbarcode Does the rear track bar brace that you mounted up on the frame change the geometry or is it just a reinforcement of the factory mounting point?

Thank you for the info.
 


Headbarcode

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It is good to learn that the rear track bar relocation bracket doesn't impede your up travel. It looks like you have 3" of bump stop blocks on the axle, which is what I have as well, but I have the Rocksport shocks that don't compress as much as your 6-paks. It seems like the 6-paks would not need as much bump stop, and the axle could travel further upward if the body work was ready to clear the tires.

When I look at the rear track bar mount on my axle it seems like there is a whole bunch of space available for up travel.

I am interested in the relocation bracket's ability to marginally improve the rear end handling in the circumstances I described above.

If I do purchase and install the relocation bracket I will continue to appreciate the strength of Metalcloak solid steel track bar that I already have installed even if the relocation bracket tends to negate the need for the track bar's adjustable length features.

Question: @Headbarcode Does the rear track bar brace that you mounted up on the frame change the geometry or is it just a reinforcement of the factory mounting point?

Thank you for the info.
The true beauty of the 6-packs short collapsed length is not for uptravel. They get coupled with drop down upper shock mounts in the front and riser brackets for the rear lower mounts. These shock relocation brackets allow the amount of droop equal to a longer extended length shock but without the uptravel restriction from a longer shocks taller collapsed length.

The frame side rear track bar reinforcement is just for added frame rigidity at the mounting point. It doesn't change the factory position.

I forget what brand axle side relocation bracket he used, but @Roky recently had to relieve it to clear the track bar at full stuff. Maybe he will chime in with some details. His Rock Krawler setup has a lot of flexibility.
 

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The true beauty of the 6-packs short collapsed length is not for uptravel. They get coupled with drop down upper shock mounts in the front and riser brackets for the rear lower mounts. These shock relocation brackets allow the amount of droop equal to a longer extended length shock but without the uptravel restriction from a longer shocks taller collapsed length.

The frame side rear track bar reinforcement is just for added frame rigidity at the mounting point. It doesn't change the factory position.

I forget what brand axle side relocation bracket he used, but @Roky recently had to relieve it to clear the track bar at full stuff. Maybe he will chime in with some details. His Rock Krawler setup has a lot of flexibility.
Hey Mike…….. yeah that was the RK relocation bracket I had to clearance a bit. To flexy……🤣……. Wasn’t a big deal really.

before
57F6E523-81C4-40DA-81EB-05300DF9FB2B.jpeg


after
7B8B5165-99DF-4813-BF68-FB76F80E7A06.jpeg
 

omnitonic

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After mulling over and weighing these same concerns, I ended up adding RK adjustable track bars to my TeraFlex 2.50" lift kit. I didn't use relocation brackets, and just adjusted the track bars to center my axles as closely as possible. (They didn't have enough adjustment granularity to achieve a perfect center.)

I have no idea if that was good or bad, right or wrong in the great cosmic Jeep scheme of things. What I do know is when I picked up my Jeep at the differential shop, it was sitting in front of the guy's sign where he had photographed it. He told me he has done probably 300 Jeeps, and I had the best riding, best handling Jeep he ever drove.

Trying to figure out the wrong and right of the geometry and center of gravity considerations makes my head hurt, but I apparently made decisions that resulted in a pretty good build. Take this for what it's worth, and I'm not claiming to be an expert on any of these issues by any means.
 

Headbarcode

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Hey Mike…….. yeah that was the RK relocation bracket I had to clearance a bit. To flexy……🤣……. Wasn’t a big deal really.

before
57F6E523-81C4-40DA-81EB-05300DF9FB2B.jpeg


after
7B8B5165-99DF-4813-BF68-FB76F80E7A06.jpeg
Thanks buddy! Was just wanting to provide as much info to op, but couldn't remember who's bracket you had to give a minor trim. Figured it'd be best to hear straight from the man himself.

By the way, that's a mighty sexy flexing beast you've got there! 💪 :clap:
 

Headbarcode

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After mulling over and weighing these same concerns, I ended up adding RK adjustable track bars to my TeraFlex 2.50" lift kit. I didn't use relocation brackets, and just adjusted the track bars to center my axles as closely as possible. (They didn't have enough adjustment granularity to achieve a perfect center.)

I have no idea if that was good or bad, right or wrong in the great cosmic Jeep scheme of things. What I do know is when I picked up my Jeep at the differential shop, it was sitting in front of the guy's sign where he had photographed it. He told me he has done probably 300 Jeeps, and I had the best riding, best handling Jeep he ever drove.

Trying to figure out the wrong and right of the geometry and center of gravity considerations makes my head hurt, but I apparently made decisions that resulted in a pretty good build. Take this for what it's worth, and I'm not claiming to be an expert on any of these issues by any means.
If you're happy and your Jeep is performing well, I'd say it's both "good" and "right", regardless of the cosmos.

 

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