Question , 3.45 gears running 35s

DadJokes

Well-Known Member
First Name
Daniel
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
1,918
Reaction score
1,482
Location
Kentucky
Vehicle(s)
Sahara
Uhh, Dana would disagree with you.
In early paperwork from late 17 and early 18 it would make sense they might stick with what’s familiar in regards to nomenclature. With the durability changes like the axle, axle shafts, ring & pinion, and bearings you’d think that wouldn’t be the case. For sure, if one was ordering parts, you can’t just say D30 or D35 for axles, bearings, & axle shafts for them. I think the R&P might be interchangeable though. At minimum, they say JL D30 and D35 on Spicer parts pdf’s etc.
Advertisement

 

jeepoch

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jay
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
467
Reaction score
1,254
Location
Longmont, CO
Vehicle(s)
2019 JL Wrangler Sport S 3.6L Auto 2 door, 2.5" lift, 35s
All,

Yes another novel, it's in my nature.

This is almost a two year old thread with recent (or ongoing) entries. So this must be a timeless (classic) issue. One of those type of Jeep gifts that just keeps on giving.

What this means is that the Jeeping community will likely never converge on a true consensus on the subject of regearing with 35 inch tires.

I'm quite certain that most (probably nearly all) will agree that the 3.45:1 ratio is not optimal, but there is little (probably nearly zero) agreement on what the optimal ratio really should be.

Take a poll, the outcome may be surprising. I suspect that 3.45, 3.83, 4.10, 4.56 or even ratio's over 5 to 1 will all have fairly even popularities. The bell curve however will likely be fairly flat over the entire distribution.

Meaning: this thread will likely solicit different opinions for quite a while longer. As long as there are Jeepers willing to drive on larger than stock tires, this debate will likely continue.

I also suspect that regearing for the m186 / m200 (or m220) axles for 37 inch or larger tires is a foregone requirement (no debate whatsoever), but regraring on 35s will always be more subjectively controversial.

Furthermore, the confusion around axle designations and types will continue to be a source of confusion. The Sport's and Sahara's have different axles than their Rubicon cousins (by design). Yet everyone believes that they're all very similar. The beefed up locking D30 / D44 designations are (or should be) used only for the factory stock Rubicon's. These come with a 4.10:1 standard gearing from the factory while the non-Rubi 'm' series all come with the 3.45:1 ratio. So comparing 35s on Rubicon's to non-Rubi's is also rather misleading.

For the record, my 2019 JL Sport Factory Equipment sheet states my Front Axle as a Standard Equipped "Dana m186" and my rear as Other Equipped "Dana m200" indicating that the "Dana m220" is indeed optional on some Sport trims (like Willy's, etc.). However, this axle brings in yet even more dynamic subjective comparison since it's a Limited Slip Differential (LSD).

While technically the type of axle (open, lsd or locking) is completely independent of the gear ratio, drivers will have different expectations or experience with available perceived torque, especially off-road dependent on which type of axle they're using. Each axle will deliver torque uniquely regardless of the installed gear ratio. So even though these types of axles and gearing are totally independent mechanisms, they both combine to giving the driver the overall impression of total applied power.

Complicating things further, there are potentially even more possible variables to consider. There could be other exceptional optional axle packages in the mix. The question of regearing on 35s needs to be mainly catorigized as either for Rubicons or non-Rubicon applications.

Running 35s on Rubi's would seem more natural and instinctive simply because of the higher gears from their standard axle offering. So most Rubicon drivers installing larger tires than their standard stock 33s will say "what's the big deal?" While the Sport and Sahara drivers installing larger tires from their stock 31.5 or 32s may complain with "this sucks!"

Clearly FCA went with the 3.45:1 gear ratio for the smaller diameter stock tires for both higher mileage and perceived power. The larger the tire diameter change delta over stock will determine the amount of diminished mileage / delivered torque.

For some this will be rather subtle, for others it will be a deal breaker. It is up to each JL owner, whether they fully understand it or not, to take all this into account before (but typically likely only after) installing larger rubber. Unfortunately either way unexpected surprises will happen. The outcome may not be exactly what was anticipated. Higher fuel consumption and the loss of pep, especially from a standstill, will be the most prevalent observations with any increase in tire size.

The larger the tire, the longer it's circumference, which translates to more distance traveled per wheel revolution. Which means less delivered power per unit distance. Increasing the overall gear ratio thus produces more engine revolutions (RPM) per wheel revolution therefore yielding more power per unit distance. This effectively gives the driver a faster acceleration from more torque delivered per unit time from the same horsepower rated power plant.

For me, I rather like the changes. I've been running 35's for about 15K of the total 20K miles on my Sport's 3.45:1 m186/m200 axles so far. I'm loving everything about it considering what the compromises are. Regearing would give me more torque off the line but would further diminish my gas mileage even more. I also rather like my 8th speed overdrive on steroids. Even if the transmission itself seldom selects it automatically, I know it's there and can always manually select it with AutoStick and often do so. This ZF8 Transmission is amazing at handling the 35s. Almost as if it was originally designed for it.

For me, the small reduction in applied torque benefits my off-road capabilities because of the nature of the open differentials on my Sport. Applying only the minimum necessary torque keeps any of my wheels from slipping.

The true beneficiaries of being able to effectively apply the higher available torque from regearing are the Rubicon's. They really don't much care if one or more of their wheels are slipping. As long as any one wheel of all their four locked wheels is grabbing, then no issue. So regearing for Rubis makes better sense.

On open-diffetentials, not so much. Open-diffs will tend to increase the likelihood of slip with more available torque (especially applied too quickly). Unlike the Rubicons, a Sport driver must understand the limitations and the constraints in using too much power. They are not afforded the luxury of having any of the four locked wheels finding traction in order to keep moving. Slippage of any single wheel on each axle spells trouble.

Open diffs only work well when neither wheel on the same axle is slipping. Their nature is that both wheels on the same axle must be gripping to some extent in order for power to be appled. If at least one wheel is gripping the motive effort (forward momentum) can be maintained. Furthermore, if at least one wheel on both axles are slipping simultaneously then all tractive effort (and thus forward momentum) is lost. This is effectively why lockers are so much more advantageous in off-road situations. They only require one (any one) wheel to be gripping in order to move. Open-diffs require at least two wheels (on the same axle) to grip in order to progress.

Thankfully the software applied Brake Lock Differential (BLD) feature on these JLs are a BIG help, by allowing even a small amount of torque to be delivered rather than none. It attempts to limit the amount of detected slip by applying the brake on just that particular slipping wheel. Thereby allowing power to still be applied to both wheels, including the non-slipping wheel. Without BLD, the open-diff axle would quickly become entirely useless on any wheel slip. For 4WD, all hope is now placed that both wheels on the other axle are still gripping.

Regardless of axle type, the real Jeeping skill is using only the minimally necessary amount of power to overcome any obstacle. This is indeed good advice for any Jeep driver independent of trim level.

So while you Rubicon drivers can muscle your way out of most anything when using your lockers by simply applying more power, us Sport drivers must apply more skill at delivering just the right amount of power to keep either one of our wheels on each axle from independently slipping. Too much power is rarely our best friend.

We can't apply the same techniques at accomplishing the same obstacles. Approach angle, weight distribution, tire placement, line selection, and throttle discipline must all be carefully considered. Traction on both wheels on each axle must always be taken into account. Whereas you Rubi drivers just tend to point and shoot. Traction on just one wheel on any single axle saves your bacon.

I like to compare this to sailing. You have either 'blow' boaters or 'go' boaters. The power boaters just point in the desired direction and increase the throttle, using very little brain-effort in the process. While the sailors must calculate the physics and dynamic atmospheric conditions to rig appropriate sails, set sail angles, adjust trim, position ballast, and steer in the most appropriate (but very seldom the straight line) heading in order to propel themselves towards the same destination.

We Sport drivers must be way more cognizant and sensitive of all the dynamic traction conditions in order to propel ourselves over the same difficult terrain.

Who gets more joy in the accomplishment?

I really do enjoy getting to the top of difficult mountain passes here in Colorado, looking around and noticing I'm typically the only non-Rubi driver here. I also take some pride in occasionally helping pull the stuck Rubicon out of trouble. Driving a Sport is both more challenging yet more exhilarating. I really do love pure Jeeping. Especially when the going gets tough. However, I'll leave the boulder bouncing, rock rambling, cliff climbing extreme stuff to the pure professionals. My interest is in seeing more of my state, not grind my way through it.

Don't get me wrong, I really am jealous of what the Rubicon's can accomplish, certainly more than any ordinary Sport. But I still like taking my lifted Sport on 35's to places where typically only the sane Rubicon's venture.

Running 35s on my Sport's standard 3.45 gearing, while not entirely (yet subjectively) optimal, is nonetheless enjoyable. I'm having a blast. As my daily driver I continue to enjoy 20+ mpg around town but really appreciate the extra capability of getting off the beaten path. Far off the beaten path. I have no current plans to regear.

My recommendation then is to pull the trigger, get on 35s (with an appropriate lift kit) and decide for yourself whether you need to regear or not. Only you can answer that for yourself.

Jay
 

JLAFAKASI

Well-Known Member
First Name
Lito
Joined
Nov 30, 2020
Messages
511
Reaction score
73
Location
Richmond, VA
Vehicle(s)
JlU Sport S 2019
Vehicle Showcase
1
I know this is an older thread but thought I would chime in. I fully plan on checking in again in 25k+ miles on my 35/30 set up. I re-geared to 4.56 and run 315's on it. AS somebody else said technically the rear is an M200 not a Dana 35. The rear is 29 spline, not the 27 spline of yesteryear Dana 35's. It is also 1.24" in diameter. For comparison sake, the JK non rubicon Dana 44 had 30 spline 1.31" in diameter axle. So while not quite there with the JK, it is VERY close. I ran my JK non Rubicon up several trails several times in Moab including Metal Masher, Hell's Revenge, Poison Spider, Steel Bender, and Kane Creek to name a few. I never broke anything or had any problems. And I ran the same tires on that set up. In my opinion 90% of wheeling comes from the driver and your tire choice. Again just my opinion. People on these forums make it sound like your axles are going to snap in half just driving down the street. I will eat my words if I am wrong which we will know soon as I have 2 moab trips booked in the next 4 months.
Have you had any issues running the sport s axles on 35's?
 

JLAFAKASI

Well-Known Member
First Name
Lito
Joined
Nov 30, 2020
Messages
511
Reaction score
73
Location
Richmond, VA
Vehicle(s)
JlU Sport S 2019
Vehicle Showcase
1
Old thread....I realize. But I've been running my 2.0 Sahara on 35s for roughly 10K miles on the original 3.45 gears. Honestly, I haven't considered it intolerable, or anything even close to that. I've wheeled it on several BOH trails in NC, GA, and AL, and it has really surprised me. I believe that the 8-speed transmission plays a huge role in 'why' this combination works. BUT....having said all that, I'm about to regear to 4.56s, and I'm really excited about it. Currently, I see 8th gear only rarely, but I 'do' see it. Interstate driving at 75mph is almost always 7th gear, and sometimes it will drop down to 6th on a hill. I'm guessing that with the 4.56s I'll get 8th gear back on a regular basis, but what I'm really excited about is to see how it effects off-roading. I guess in summary, there's no doubt in my mind that you can get away with running 35s with the auto trans and 3.45 gears. But I can not wait to see what the 4.56s give me..:)
Did you get that regear yet? Also did you put any lockers on?
 

JLAFAKASI

Well-Known Member
First Name
Lito
Joined
Nov 30, 2020
Messages
511
Reaction score
73
Location
Richmond, VA
Vehicle(s)
JlU Sport S 2019
Vehicle Showcase
1
Great. I've been running the 4.56 gears now for roughly 10k miles. They're perfect for 35 inch tires. I'm sure I could easily turn 37s now, but I doubt that I'll do that anytime soon.
Did you get some mpgs back?
 

Ran4

Well-Known Member
First Name
Randy
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Messages
245
Reaction score
424
Location
Port Saint Luce FL and Charlotte, NC
Vehicle(s)
2019 Sahara Unlimited
Occupation
Retired
Did you get some mpgs back?
Yes, I gained back about 1.5 to 2mpg. It's by far the best upgrade I've done. My Sahara axles have held up just fine. Honestly, I'm not really interested in putting lockers on this Jeep. I've wheeled it pretty hard, earned 17 BOH badges, including lots of Colorado and Moab trails without needing lockers. Oh, I'm sure they'd be nice to have, but I will tell you that I've been thoroughly impressed with the BLD on these Sahara axles
 

JLAFAKASI

Well-Known Member
First Name
Lito
Joined
Nov 30, 2020
Messages
511
Reaction score
73
Location
Richmond, VA
Vehicle(s)
JlU Sport S 2019
Vehicle Showcase
1
Yes, I gained back about 1.5 to 2mpg. It's by far the best upgrade I've done. My Sahara axles have held up just fine. Honestly, I'm not really interested in putting lockers on this Jeep. I've wheeled it pretty hard, earned 17 BOH badges, including lots of Colorado and Moab trails without needing lockers. Oh, I'm sure they'd be nice to have, but I will tell you that I've been thoroughly impressed with the BLD on these Sahara axles
I think not having the easy way out with our non rubi gets requires us to use skill and taking proper lines...
 

Alabamajeeper

Member
First Name
Allen
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
4
Location
NorthAlabama
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep jlu
All,

Yes another novel, it's in my nature.

This is almost a two year old thread with recent (or ongoing) entries. So this must be a timeless (classic) issue. One of those type of Jeep gifts that just keeps on giving.

What this means is that the Jeeping community will likely never converge on a true consensus on the subject of regearing with 35 inch tires.

I'm quite certain that most (probably nearly all) will agree that the 3.45:1 ratio is not optimal, but there is little (probably nearly zero) agreement on what the optimal ratio really should be.

Take a poll, the outcome may be surprising. I suspect that 3.45, 3.83, 4.10, 4.56 or even ratio's over 5 to 1 will all have fairly even popularities. The bell curve however will likely be fairly flat over the entire distribution.

Meaning: this thread will likely solicit different opinions for quite a while longer. As long as there are Jeepers willing to drive on larger than stock tires, this debate will likely continue.

I also suspect that regearing for the m186 / m200 (or m220) axles for 37 inch or larger tires is a foregone requirement (no debate whatsoever), but regraring on 35s will always be more subjectively controversial.

Furthermore, the confusion around axle designations and types will continue to be a source of confusion. The Sport's and Sahara's have different axles than their Rubicon cousins (by design). Yet everyone believes that they're all very similar. The beefed up locking D30 / D44 designations are (or should be) used only for the factory stock Rubicon's. These come with a 4.10:1 standard gearing from the factory while the non-Rubi 'm' series all come with the 3.45:1 ratio. So comparing 35s on Rubicon's to non-Rubi's is also rather misleading.

For the record, my 2019 JL Sport Factory Equipment sheet states my Front Axle as a Standard Equipped "Dana m186" and my rear as Other Equipped "Dana m200" indicating that the "Dana m220" is indeed optional on some Sport trims (like Willy's, etc.). However, this axle brings in yet even more dynamic subjective comparison since it's a Limited Slip Differential (LSD).

While technically the type of axle (open, lsd or locking) is completely independent of the gear ratio, drivers will have different expectations or experience with available perceived torque, especially off-road dependent on which type of axle they're using. Each axle will deliver torque uniquely regardless of the installed gear ratio. So even though these types of axles and gearing are totally independent mechanisms, they both combine to giving the driver the overall impression of total applied power.

Complicating things further, there are potentially even more possible variables to consider. There could be other exceptional optional axle packages in the mix. The question of regearing on 35s needs to be mainly catorigized as either for Rubicons or non-Rubicon applications.

Running 35s on Rubi's would seem more natural and instinctive simply because of the higher gears from their standard axle offering. So most Rubicon drivers installing larger tires than their standard stock 33s will say "what's the big deal?" While the Sport and Sahara drivers installing larger tires from their stock 31.5 or 32s may complain with "this sucks!"

Clearly FCA went with the 3.45:1 gear ratio for the smaller diameter stock tires for both higher mileage and perceived power. The larger the tire diameter change delta over stock will determine the amount of diminished mileage / delivered torque.

For some this will be rather subtle, for others it will be a deal breaker. It is up to each JL owner, whether they fully understand it or not, to take all this into account before (but typically likely only after) installing larger rubber. Unfortunately either way unexpected surprises will happen. The outcome may not be exactly what was anticipated. Higher fuel consumption and the loss of pep, especially from a standstill, will be the most prevalent observations with any increase in tire size.

The larger the tire, the longer it's circumference, which translates to more distance traveled per wheel revolution. Which means less delivered power per unit distance. Increasing the overall gear ratio thus produces more engine revolutions (RPM) per wheel revolution therefore yielding more power per unit distance. This effectively gives the driver a faster acceleration from more torque delivered per unit time from the same horsepower rated power plant.

For me, I rather like the changes. I've been running 35's for about 15K of the total 20K miles on my Sport's 3.45:1 m186/m200 axles so far. I'm loving everything about it considering what the compromises are. Regearing would give me more torque off the line but would further diminish my gas mileage even more. I also rather like my 8th speed overdrive on steroids. Even if the transmission itself seldom selects it automatically, I know it's there and can always manually select it with AutoStick and often do so. This ZF8 Transmission is amazing at handling the 35s. Almost as if it was originally designed for it.

For me, the small reduction in applied torque benefits my off-road capabilities because of the nature of the open differentials on my Sport. Applying only the minimum necessary torque keeps any of my wheels from slipping.

The true beneficiaries of being able to effectively apply the higher available torque from regearing are the Rubicon's. They really don't much care if one or more of their wheels are slipping. As long as any one wheel of all their four locked wheels is grabbing, then no issue. So regearing for Rubis makes better sense.

On open-diffetentials, not so much. Open-diffs will tend to increase the likelihood of slip with more available torque (especially applied too quickly). Unlike the Rubicons, a Sport driver must understand the limitations and the constraints in using too much power. They are not afforded the luxury of having any of the four locked wheels finding traction in order to keep moving. Slippage of any single wheel on each axle spells trouble.

Open diffs only work well when neither wheel on the same axle is slipping. Their nature is that both wheels on the same axle must be gripping to some extent in order for power to be appled. If at least one wheel is gripping the motive effort (forward momentum) can be maintained. Furthermore, if at least one wheel on both axles are slipping simultaneously then all tractive effort (and thus forward momentum) is lost. This is effectively why lockers are so much more advantageous in off-road situations. They only require one (any one) wheel to be gripping in order to move. Open-diffs require at least two wheels (on the same axle) to grip in order to progress.

Thankfully the software applied Brake Lock Differential (BLD) feature on these JLs are a BIG help, by allowing even a small amount of torque to be delivered rather than none. It attempts to limit the amount of detected slip by applying the brake on just that particular slipping wheel. Thereby allowing power to still be applied to both wheels, including the non-slipping wheel. Without BLD, the open-diff axle would quickly become entirely useless on any wheel slip. For 4WD, all hope is now placed that both wheels on the other axle are still gripping.

Regardless of axle type, the real Jeeping skill is using only the minimally necessary amount of power to overcome any obstacle. This is indeed good advice for any Jeep driver independent of trim level.

So while you Rubicon drivers can muscle your way out of most anything when using your lockers by simply applying more power, us Sport drivers must apply more skill at delivering just the right amount of power to keep either one of our wheels on each axle from independently slipping. Too much power is rarely our best friend.

We can't apply the same techniques at accomplishing the same obstacles. Approach angle, weight distribution, tire placement, line selection, and throttle discipline must all be carefully considered. Traction on both wheels on each axle must always be taken into account. Whereas you Rubi drivers just tend to point and shoot. Traction on just one wheel on any single axle saves your bacon.

I like to compare this to sailing. You have either 'blow' boaters or 'go' boaters. The power boaters just point in the desired direction and increase the throttle, using very little brain-effort in the process. While the sailors must calculate the physics and dynamic atmospheric conditions to rig appropriate sails, set sail angles, adjust trim, position ballast, and steer in the most appropriate (but very seldom the straight line) heading in order to propel themselves towards the same destination.

We Sport drivers must be way more cognizant and sensitive of all the dynamic traction conditions in order to propel ourselves over the same difficult terrain.

Who gets more joy in the accomplishment?

I really do enjoy getting to the top of difficult mountain passes here in Colorado, looking around and noticing I'm typically the only non-Rubi driver here. I also take some pride in occasionally helping pull the stuck Rubicon out of trouble. Driving a Sport is both more challenging yet more exhilarating. I really do love pure Jeeping. Especially when the going gets tough. However, I'll leave the boulder bouncing, rock rambling, cliff climbing extreme stuff to the pure professionals. My interest is in seeing more of my state, not grind my way through it.

Don't get me wrong, I really am jealous of what the Rubicon's can accomplish, certainly more than any ordinary Sport. But I still like taking my lifted Sport on 35's to places where typically only the sane Rubicon's venture.

Running 35s on my Sport's standard 3.45 gearing, while not entirely (yet subjectively) optimal, is nonetheless enjoyable. I'm having a blast. As my daily driver I continue to enjoy 20+ mpg around town but really appreciate the extra capability of getting off the beaten path. Far off the beaten path. I have no current plans to regear.

My recommendation then is to pull the trigger, get on 35s (with an appropriate lift kit) and decide for yourself whether you need to regear or not. Only you can answer that for yourself.

Jay
Are you still running you 35” on the stock 2019 JLU? What size tire & type? Are you still okay with your setup? I am trying to decide if I want to do about the same . I just purchased some Kenda klever 35x10.5r17 which measures out right a 34” maybe 34.2 when I got them? Spec said 34.7”? Others stated that these when load may go down to about 33.75 ? I will be adding a 2.5 lift as well to my stock rims setup 2.0 2019 Jeep JLU. Will only do light off-roading! . I thought about return the 35” and going with same tire but 285/70r17 which spec shows 32.9” but I assume they will be lower maybe around 32.5 when loaded? Just bigger than the next size of 33x10.5 r17 they offer. Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

migyb

Well-Known Member
First Name
Miguel
Joined
Feb 10, 2020
Messages
87
Reaction score
90
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLU Willys
Are you still running you 35” on the stock 2019 JLU? What size tire & type? Are you still okay with your setup? I am trying to decide if I want to do about the same . I just purchased some Kenda klever 35x10.5r17 which measures out right a 34” maybe 34.2 when I got them? Spec said 34.7”? Others stated that these when load may go down to about 33.75 ? I will be adding a 2.5 lift as well to my stock rims setup 2.0 2019 Jeep JLU. Will only do light off-roading! . I thought about return the 35” and going with same tire but 285/70r17 which spec shows 32.9” but I assume they will be lower maybe around 32.5 when loaded? Just bigger than the next size of 33x10.5 r17 they offer. Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks
With those 35/10.5/17s, and a 2.5 lift, I am willing to bet that you will not only enjoy the new look of your jeep but also continue to love driving it. You may lose some peppiness off the line due to the bigger tires, but the 2.0 (bonus if you have the etorque) helps minimize that as much as possible.

If you got the cash to do so, I suggest you pull the trigger and go for it. You'll always be wondering what driving around in 35's feels like - you'll never know unless you do it.

Just make sure to recalibrate for the right tire size as this will adjust for proper shift points.

Please post pics of those skinnier 35's with the lift! I am planning to switch over once I find those tires locally (I have 35/12.5's/17s w/stock rims).
 

Alabamajeeper

Member
First Name
Allen
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
4
Location
NorthAlabama
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep jlu
With those 35/10.5/17s, and a 2.5 lift, I am willing to bet that you will not only enjoy the new look of your jeep but also continue to love driving it. You may lose some peppiness off the line due to the bigger tires, but the 2.0 (bonus if you have the etorque) helps minimize that as much as possible.

If you got the cash to do so, I suggest you pull the trigger and go for it. You'll always be wondering what driving around in 35's feels like - you'll never know unless you do it.

Just make sure to recalibrate for the right tire size as this will adjust for proper shift points.

Please post pics of those skinnier 35's with the lift! I am planning to switch over once I find those tires locally (I have 35/12.5's/17s w/stock rims).
Thanks for the information . I will post pics. I am still waiting on a couple of items to complete the lift. Did you have to use spacers with you stock rims? Have you also noticed a big lose of mpg?
With those 35/10.5/17s, and a 2.5 lift, I am willing to bet that you will not only enjoy the new look of your jeep but also continue to love driving it. You may lose some peppiness off the line due to the bigger tires, but the 2.0 (bonus if you have the etorque) helps minimize that as much as possible.

If you got the cash to do so, I suggest you pull the trigger and go for it. You'll always be wondering what driving around in 35's feels like - you'll never know unless you do it.

Just make sure to recalibrate for the right tire size as this will adjust for proper shift points.

Please post pics of those skinnier 35's with the lift! I am planning to switch over once I find those tires locally (I have 35/12.5's/17s w/stock rims).
Thanks for the information . I will post pics. I am still waiting on a couple of items to complete the lift setup. I wanted to go ahead and get an adjustable track bar for front and maybe control arm relocation bracket. Did you have to use spacers with you stock rims and the 35x12.5? Have you also noticed a big lose of mpg? I do have the 2.0 etorque as well and I real like it, a lot of Pep!
Thanks again Allen
 

jeepoch

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jay
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
467
Reaction score
1,254
Location
Longmont, CO
Vehicle(s)
2019 JL Wrangler Sport S 3.6L Auto 2 door, 2.5" lift, 35s
Are you still running you 35” on the stock 2019 JLU? What size tire & type? Are you still okay with your setup? I am trying to decide if I want to do about the same . I just purchased some Kenda klever 35x10.5r17 which measures out right a 34” maybe 34.2 when I got them? Spec said 34.7”? Others stated that these when load may go down to about 33.75 ? I will be adding a 2.5 lift as well to my stock rims setup 2.0 2019 Jeep JLU. Will only do light off-roading! . I thought about return the 35” and going with same tire but 285/70r17 which spec shows 32.9” but I assume they will be lower maybe around 32.5 when loaded? Just bigger than the next size of 33x10.5 r17 they offer. Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks
Allen,

Yes I am still running Goodyear Duratrac Wrangler All-Terrain 35x12.5x17s on my 2.5" Lifted Sport S. Almost 15K miles on them so far. Best investment I've made for the way I drive it. These Duratracs are living up to their reputation in the snow, I haven't needed putting chains on yet this season in Northern CO.

These tires measure in at 34.8" in diameter at their optimal on-road pressure of 38 psi cold. This is based upon a chalk test. They do drop my clearance when aired down to 15 psi off-road but I never measured it. I suspect somewhere in the neighborhood of about a half inch or so. But the 2.5" Mopar lift has yielded me almost 3 full inches of additional clearance so airing down is never a worry.

It is both the clearance and traction that I'm after. Nearly every decent trail in my state have enough obstacles where it would make it pretty challenging in a stock Jeep. Not that I'm saying smaller rubber wouldn't work on most trails, but clearly the skill and hubris of the driver will then be the biggest factors. However, there are some trails where higher clearance and lockers are most definitely recommended.

Having a Sport with the open diffs (both front and rear) make the rubber one of the most important characteristics of my Jeeping equation. It's not so much the size it's the grip. The tread, width, load rating and psi are what is most important to me.

Many people shy away from 'E' load rated tires due to their stiffness on-road but the added durability when aired way down is really impressive. I want about as puncture resistant of rubber on-trail as possible.

The all-terrain tread is by far the biggest help. Without lockers I need at least two tractive wheels, one on each axle, to maintain momentum. With locked axles, just one non-slipping wheel (anywhere) will keep you going. The Brake Locking Differential (BLD) software functionality on these JLs are a very big help. But clearly, gripping rubber that minimizes slip in any condition is about the most important aspect for any on or off-road maneuver.

So don't just worry about size. Consider what you want to do with your Jeep, where you want to take it, how aggressive you're going to be with it and make a comprehensive choice of rubber from there. This is likely the biggest factor on what your Jeep (and your skill) will be able to accomplish. It's also a lot of fun when you've made the right rubber choice. Not getting stuck is way cool.

Hope this helps.
Jay
 

Alabamajeeper

Member
First Name
Allen
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
4
Location
NorthAlabama
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep jlu
Got everything finished . I have stock rims on my 2019 JLU sport with Kenda Klever R/T KR601 35x10.50R17 without any wheel spacers on a 2.5” Superlift with shadow shocks. Also Added new adjustable rough country track bar , rancho control arm drop bracket and a superlift rear track bar relocation bracket. also added a new red rock rear door reinforcement bracket for the door hinges and a rough county spare tire relocation bracket for the 35” spare . The lift ended up giving me around 3+ inches of lift with my 2.0. so far everything is doing good after the front end alignment. No rubbing at all so far but have not put it in a total flex yet. Loving the look . I believe I have lost 2 -3 mpg in the city driving but have did any highway driving yet to tell the Hwy mpg out come. Still feels like it has lots of power.

1AF032C5-E2F7-4F1B-8E23-3756B4174F98.jpeg


49038E38-80E2-47B8-80D1-1B603BD790C2.jpeg


281375F9-87E0-4DB1-91E2-54BC3DB0E47F.jpeg


0DE2F924-31DD-414A-B9ED-13A5B79E6481.jpeg


C1BD8E99-4E15-48EB-AEE7-3764DDAF383E.jpeg
 

migyb

Well-Known Member
First Name
Miguel
Joined
Feb 10, 2020
Messages
87
Reaction score
90
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLU Willys
Got everything finished . I have stock rims on my 2019 JLU sport with Kenda Klever R/T KR601 35x10.50R17 without any wheel spacers on a 2.5” Superlift with shadow shocks. Also Added new adjustable rough country track bar , rancho control arm drop bracket and a superlift rear track bar relocation bracket. also added a new red rock rear door reinforcement bracket for the door hinges and a rough county spare tire relocation bracket for the 35” spare . The lift ended up giving me around 3+ inches of lift with my 2.0. so far everything is doing good after the front end alignment. No rubbing at all so far but have not put it in a total flex yet. Loving the look . I believe I have lost 2 -3 mpg in the city driving but have did any highway driving yet to tell the Hwy mpg out come. Still feels like it has lots of power.

1AF032C5-E2F7-4F1B-8E23-3756B4174F98.jpeg


49038E38-80E2-47B8-80D1-1B603BD790C2.jpeg


281375F9-87E0-4DB1-91E2-54BC3DB0E47F.jpeg


0DE2F924-31DD-414A-B9ED-13A5B79E6481.jpeg


C1BD8E99-4E15-48EB-AEE7-3764DDAF383E.jpeg
Hows your handling compared to stock form?
 

Alabamajeeper

Member
First Name
Allen
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
4
Location
NorthAlabama
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep jlu
Allen,

Yes I am still running Goodyear Duratrac Wrangler All-Terrain 35x12.5x17s on my 2.5" Lifted Sport S. Almost 15K miles on them so far. Best investment I've made for the way I drive it. These Duratracs are living up to their reputation in the snow, I haven't needed putting chains on yet this season in Northern CO.

These tires measure in at 34.8" in diameter at their optimal on-road pressure of 38 psi cold. This is based upon a chalk test. They do drop my clearance when aired down to 15 psi off-road but I never measured it. I suspect somewhere in the neighborhood of about a half inch or so. But the 2.5" Mopar lift has yielded me almost 3 full inches of additional clearance so airing down is never a worry.

It is both the clearance and traction that I'm after. Nearly every decent trail in my state have enough obstacles where it would make it pretty challenging in a stock Jeep. Not that I'm saying smaller rubber wouldn't work on most trails, but clearly the skill and hubris of the driver will then be the biggest factors. However, there are some trails where higher clearance and lockers are most definitely recommended.

Having a Sport with the open diffs (both front and rear) make the rubber one of the most important characteristics of my Jeeping equation. It's not so much the size it's the grip. The tread, width, load rating and psi are what is most important to me.

Many people shy away from 'E' load rated tires due to their stiffness on-road but the added durability when aired way down is really impressive. I want about as puncture resistant of rubber on-trail as possible.

The all-terrain tread is by far the biggest help. Without lockers I need at least two tractive wheels, one on each axle, to maintain momentum. With locked axles, just one non-slipping wheel (anywhere) will keep you going. The Brake Locking Differential (BLD) software functionality on these JLs are a very big help. But clearly, gripping rubber that minimizes slip in any condition is about the most important aspect for any on or off-road maneuver.

So don't just worry about size. Consider what you want to do with your Jeep, where you want to take it, how aggressive you're going to be with it and make a comprehensive choice of rubber from there. This is likely the biggest factor on what your Jeep (and your skill) will be able to accomplish. It's also a lot of fun when you've made the right rubber choice. Not getting stuck is way cool.

Hope this helps.
Jay
Hows your handling compared to stock form?
Doing good maybe a little loser than the stock but feels okay. I thought about putting on a dual front steering stabilizer. What do y’all think ?
 

migyb

Well-Known Member
First Name
Miguel
Joined
Feb 10, 2020
Messages
87
Reaction score
90
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2020 JLU Willys
Doing good maybe a little loser than the stock but feels okay. I thought about putting on a dual front steering stabilizer. What do y’all think ?
Heard a lot of good reviews on the one teraflex makes. Thats the route I am thinking of going, or I could try and correct geometry properly to have a better ride? I would love the adjustability aspect of having the teraflex stabilizer tho...
 
Advertisement

Winjet
 
Advertisement
Top