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Gladius Nova

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Unless your target audience is eligible for social security, cursive is effectively a dead skill. Anyone under 30 are not expected to read it, let alone write it.

My advice on penmanship is to learn to write like an engineer or architect. It’s precise, easy to read, professional, and once you learn it, quick to write. The architectural style is a little more elegant and I use it professionally even though I’m in the government IT field.

I've actually been writing like this since my senior year in high school (a long time ago). Some of my teachers gave me crap about it but I didn't care. Nice an legible and every now and then people comment on "how nice" I write. My Grandpa had the nicest handwriting I have ever seen.

 

The Last Cowboy

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You illustrate a greater problem with companies that many, including the employees, don’t understand. That is the quarterly report. If the stock value increases then those inefficiencies are overlooked. Someone, somewhere would be bragging about how the flat rate for shipping increased sales, therefore increasing the value of the stock, while the loss on the shipping and receiving side is overlooked. I know it seems counter productive, and it is. This is one of the reasons why big companies go bankrupt.

Slow and steady wins in the long run. It seems that fiscal prudence seems to be lost today. Many who aspire to, and reach the corporate C suite, want it all right now. Very few big corporations are run by people who care about or even have any knowledge of the particular widget that company was built upon. They are modern day kings and earls extracting as much wealth from their fiefdom as they can. Of course, not all companies and corporations are run that way. Many are still run by the person who started it and have a passion for their product or service. The successful ones often get gobbled up by a larger company and that is where the disconnect begins.

This is a very simplified explanation and I expect it could keep us speaking for days.
 

CT_LFC

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No company is run perfectly, but stock isn't going to just magically go up if there are major inefficiencies. Sooner or later it catches up to them. That is naive. In the C&B example, their stock would not have gone up because they would have shown an operating loss and you better have a damn good explanation for that instead of "we paid $240 shipping on a product we sold for $199".

Revenue is just one of the metrics the street cares about, but they also care about profit, margin % and EPS (among others) so inflating one metric (revenue) at the expense of the others is not going to result in a favorable stock price.
 

Heimkehr

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I've actually been writing like this since my senior year in high school (a long time ago). Some of my teachers gave me crap about it but I didn't care. Nice an legible and every now and then people comment on "how nice" I write. My Grandpa had the nicest handwriting I have ever seen.
I started using so-called architect block printing -- functionally, all-caps -- in 6th grade. I discovered that I could put more text down on paper, and for a longer period of time, without my hand cramping up as quickly as it did when I did a deep dive writing assignment using cursive. All-caps was a supplement and not a replacement for cursive, though, and I'll use one or the other to this day as the mood strikes.

My parents have excellent handwriting; they were taught by the same order of nuns that taught me to write (and later, in high school, type).

I'll admit to using a single finger when composing a text message; I have zero interest in developing the unique thumb skills that I see some folks using. This may be linked to my infrequent use of text messaging, and my corresponding low opinion of that method of communication for anything beyond "Be home soon" or "Get some tuna too when you stop at the store for milk."
 


MCJA

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Bought a house in July '21. Today, 9 months later, it's "worth" $100k more. And that's just an estimate based on inflation, not a reflection of the remodeling and improvements we've made during the 9 months we've owned it. Plus, nothing sells for listing price these days. If you don't offer 10% to 20% over asking price, then you're not even competitive. If I put my house on the market today, I would probably get between $225k and $275k more than what I paid for it. Ridiculous.

I agree with what others have said here: the best bet right now is to just hunker down and wait for the market adjustment. Hopefully we don't see another collapse like in ~2007. It may be tempting to sell a house now for many tens (or hundreds) of thousands more than what you paid, but you're going to give all of that up when you buy another house for many tens or hundreds of thousands more than it's actually worth.

Someone mentioned that it's tempting to just buy some land out in the middle of nowhere and build. Tempting indeed. Except for the fact that building materials have gone up 5x to 8x in the past two years.

Crazy.
 

Koolkarguy

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I built three years ago. I could damn near double my investment now.

Makes moving out to the middle of nowhere even more attractive.
Just sold a house out in the middle of nowhere i bought in 2010 for $67,500 have rented it out the whole time spent $15,000 on it in Jan Feb getting itvready to sell....advertise it with my realtor for $425,000 sold it in in a little over an hour to a couple from California for cash for $550,000 no inspections no nothing this world has lost there mind's!!!
 

Gladius Nova

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Just sold a house out in the middle of nowhere i bought in 2010 for $67,500 have rented it out the whole time spent $15,000 on it in Jan Feb getting itvready to sell....advertise it with my realtor for $425,000 sold it in in a little over an hour to a couple from California for cash for $550,000 no inspections no nothing this world has lost there mind's!!!
And you are almost half a mil richer. Congrats.
 

Heimkehr

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Just sold a house out in the middle of nowhere i bought in 2010 for $67,500 have rented it out the whole time spent $15,000 on it in Jan Feb getting itvready to sell....advertise it with my realtor for $425,000 sold it in in a little over an hour to a couple from California for cash for $550,000 no inspections no nothing this world has lost there mind's!!!
It's a bit surprising that few of these posts mention the seller using a For Sale By Owner listing.

Given the way houses are selling themselves these days, and for well above list price in some instances, there's no better argument to do one's own showings and put in your pocket the commission portion of the sale proceeds that would needlessly go into a realtor's purse.

We did a FSBO in 2006, selling for list in 3 days. My opinion of the house selling industry hasn't improved a whit since that time.
 

aville65

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I’m so old I remember taking a $20, filling the car, taking a girlfriend to a movie, then going out for burgers, fries and a shake and still having MONEY left over. THAT was a LONG time ago….
I’m with you buddy, back when I smoked cost me .29 For a pack of Salems and 3.70 to fill up my 69 Beetle. I remember reading about this in world cultures class how people in China would have to wheelbarrow their coin to the market for a loaf of bread.

So glad we’re in the good hands of our government, both parties.
 


OP
OP

Shibadog

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I’m with you buddy, back when I smoked cost me .29 For a pack of Salems and 3.70 to fill up my 69 Beetle. I remember reading about this in world cultures class how people in China would have to wheelbarrow their coin to the market for a loaf of bread.

So glad we’re in the good hands of our government, both parties.
Amen..
 

HiGhBaLL

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Price growth since March 2020 is beginning to surprise even me.

It started with Carvana offering me $5K more than I paid for my JLU Sport. No surprise there; there's any number of forum posts where fellow owners fielded similar offers.

No, what's intriguing, to put it politely, is the strength of the trend.

A work colleague's neighbor recently listed his house for $429K. Three days later it was under contract...for $550K. That's the power of low inventory.

Mrs. H periodically sends me comps of the recently sold houses in our neighborhood. Simple extrapolation makes plain that we'd really make bank if listing our house now. What she is less willing to concede is how all of that and more would be needed to purchase another house...and that's if we were even able to find one that meets our requirements and have our offer accepted. No, it's better to just hunker down for now.

And as for the current valuations of those things that we might park in a safe, and not a garage? Fuhgeddaboudit. ;)
Yeah that's the boat we're in. We only bought our house around 3 years ago and we could easily sell it for 250k more than we bought it already. We put in a fence, patio, irrigation, and I finished the basement, but still, that's crazy. Problem is getting back out in this market. Especially around here.
 

Nitehawk92

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Kind of a different story here. My daughter and her BF found out about a house before it got listed. They agreed with the seller to pay $240,000. They went through the entire process30 days or more, and then the house only appraised at $204,000. The seller wanted them to make up the difference, but they didn't have it. A realtor told the guy if you list it you will have to pay the realtor fees and other costs and the house will still only appraise at $204,000. So he gave in and sold them the house for $204,000. $37,000 below asking price. Talk about lucky.
 

Wbino

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I’m with you buddy, back when I smoked cost me .29 For a pack of Salems and 3.70 to fill up my 69 Beetle. I remember reading about this in world cultures class how people in China would have to wheelbarrow their coin to the market for a loaf of bread.

So glad we’re in the good hands of our government, both parties.
Wall street and Lobbyist are your problem.

 

Rancho
 
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