Poll: what are you most concerned about?

What are you most concerned about?

  • Catching the COVID-19 virus.

  • The short and long-term impact of our government's actions.


Results are only viewable after voting.

viper88

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What mask shortage? These innovative and crafty Wallmart shoppers have a solution!

OK, I admit…. I am a little concern about evolution and natural selection...

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Shots

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lol, only at Walmart.
 

wordslayer

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You can't really say this, but price gouging is actually what we need.

If the free market were actually working, then stores could mark up hand sanitizer to 40, 50, 100 dollars a bottle. That would ensure that hoarding would stop. People would spend less on things that don't matter and more on the things that do matter.

A few years ago there was a massive ice storm here and everyone was without power for quite some time. You could not find a generator in town. However, two days later people came in with generators that they bought from neighboring states. They set up in town to sell them here. The generators were priced four times what people wanted to pay for them, but guess what, people did buy them and they were able to stay in their homes, feed their animals, and tend to the things they needed to.

if you let the free market work, most of the time things take care of themselves.
 

Shots

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I'm far from a socialist, and generally agree with free the market concept. However, that only works until someone has a monopoly on an item. Once that person/company has sole control of that item they can (and often will) price gouge. Your generator example is a perfect reflection of that. People aren't hoarding generators, and so the elevated prices is for profit only, not to control sales. With a monopoly you see things like a generator at 4 times the normal cost, a bottle of sanitizor for $50, or a cancer treatment for $4,000 per dose. These extreme rates only ensure that the wealthy can get it the item, and the manufacturer/seller of these products get rich.
I understand that the people selling an item aren't specifically trying to exclude the impoverished, but instead are trying to make the most profit. That's free market, sell for what the market will bear (supply/demand) That's all good and well when there is competition for the item, and the consumer has a choice. However when you're the only one with that item, jacking the price up is simply gouging and greedy. That's why monopolies are supposed to be illegal.

What we NEED is for people to stop panicking and buy what they need when they need it like they did before this all started.

As it turns out, shows like The Walking Dead were right. The disease isn't so much a problem as much as the people are. Greed, over-reaction, and mis-information are what's really causing problems.
 

roaniecowpony

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To the original question, I'm probably most (more than dying from C-19) concerned about a collapse of enough of our economy to where my investments never recover in my lifetime and I end up with not enough money to live out my life comfortably, since I have zero income. At the moment, that and me or my wife catching C-19 and dying from it are at the top of my list. As the lockdown is prolonged, the first issue gets more concerning. As the number of cases and deaths grow, the second gets more concerning. My gardener's wife worked for someone that died from C-19 last week. Our neighbor works at a hospital where patients have died from it. It's in my frontyard. Sure, I'm worried. I'd be ignoring realistic possibilities otherwise.

The other, less concerning, possibility is that rioting, looting, and other crime takes off. I'm in the burbs of LA. It's certainly happened not so long ago with the Rodney King riots. I'm in a fairly affluent neighborhood, mostly professionals of some kind or another. Perfect for bad people looking for stuff they want. We've already had a burglary in a house on the street a week ago and some vehicle burglaries. I'm going to start checking our city police blotter online. At least a couple of us on the street are "gun enthusiasts", maybe some closet gun people too. During the Rodney King riots, residents blocked off their streets with their vehicles and armed sentries prevented non-residents from entering their streets. Might happen again. Hope not.
 

Shots

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While rioting in major metropolitan areas could certainly occur, I don't see it being as likely as it was during the Rodney King riots. The main reason being that during R.K., Watts, Kent State and other riots, the crowd was allegedly protesting something/someone and mob mentality took over. It can still happen, as it did during the N.Y. Blackout ('77) where it wasn't resulting from a "protest", so I wouldn't rule it out.
I can't speak for every state, but Ohio has increased police presence in areas likely to be targeted by early looters. So all the closed schools, churches and other buildings that have essentially been abandoned are being watched more closely. Homes are currently less likely to be targeted, because it is assumed that people are there since they are supposed to stay home, and many don't have to go to work right now. This could obviously change as things develop, but as it is, I'm more concerned about the soft targets like closed building which are known to typically have supplies (cleaning and food).
FWIW the Ohio National Guard is ready to respond and the state, county and local police have their riot/swat teams prepared for response as needed. Although these things aren't readily apparent to the public, they are in place and ready for rapid response.
 

roaniecowpony

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While rioting in major metropolitan areas could certainly occur, I don't see it being as likely as it was during the Rodney King riots. The main reason being that during R.K., Watts, Kent State and other riots, the crowd was allegedly protesting something/someone and mob mentality took over. It can still happen, as it did during the N.Y. Blackout ('77) where it wasn't resulting from a "protest", so I wouldn't rule it out.
I can't speak for every state, but Ohio has increased police presence in areas likely to be targeted by early looters. So all the closed schools, churches and other buildings that have essentially been abandoned are being watched more closely. Homes are currently less likely to be targeted, because it is assumed that people are there since they are supposed to stay home, and many don't have to go to work right now. This could obviously change as things develop, but as it is, I'm more concerned about the soft targets like closed building which are known to typically have supplies (cleaning and food).
FWIW the Ohio National Guard is ready to respond and the state, county and local police have their riot/swat teams prepared for response as needed. Although these things aren't readily apparent to the public, they are in place and ready for rapid response.
Maybe "rioting" was the wrong term. Widespread mob pillaging and rampant crime is probably closer to what I saw in person during the RK "riots" and what I think has a real possibility of occurring. I think the trigger could be just not having money from lack of work, therefore no food, etc..
 

viper88

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Maybe "rioting" was the wrong term. Widespread mob pillaging and rampant crime is probably closer to what I saw in person during the RK "riots" and what I think has a real possibility of occurring. I think the trigger could be just not having money from lack of work, therefore no food, etc..
Some major cities are definitely at the boiling point. Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, NY, Chicago and a few others are really bad.

These cities all have problems now.

Miami, FL
Omaha, Nebraska
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Jacksonville, Florida
Seattle, Washington
Minneapolis, Minn.
Los Angeles, Calif.
New York, N.Y.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Nashville, Tenn.
San Francisco, Calif.
Detroit, Mich.
Portland, Ore.
Memphis, Tenn.
Chicago, Ill.
Atlanta, Ga.
Washington, D.C.
Madison, Wis.
Denver, Colo.
Albuquerque, N.M.
Columbus, Ohio
Houston, Texas
Phoenix, Ariz.
Louisville, Ky.
St. Louis, Mo.
Oakland, Calif.
 

Kluk Ztopolovky

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You can't really say this, but price gouging is actually what we need.

If the free market were actually working, then stores could mark up hand sanitizer to 40, 50, 100 dollars a bottle. That would ensure that hoarding would stop. People would spend less on things that don't matter and more on the things that do matter.

A few years ago there was a massive ice storm here and everyone was without power for quite some time. You could not find a generator in town. However, two days later people came in with generators that they bought from neighboring states. They set up in town to sell them here. The generators were priced four times what people wanted to pay for them, but guess what, people did buy them and they were able to stay in their homes, feed their animals, and tend to the things they needed to.

if you let the free market work, most of the time things take care of themselves.
precisly, people forget it was the free market that created strongest economies and yes it is the socialists that drive people to graves
 

GtX

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I think the trigger could be just not having money from lack of work, therefore no food, etc..
Looting food is one thing if you have no money and no food.
Looting a TV and designer brand cloths because you can is another thing.
 

viper88

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GtX

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