On July 30th, I received my ordered Wrangler Turbo 2.0L, does anyone else have one?

On July 30th, I received my ordered Wrangler turbo 2.0L, does anyone else have theirs yet? Send pics


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kre62

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The numbers would not support your statement at all. The 2.0 makes more torque and more HP at lower RPM plus it has a battery motor assist for added low rpm torque. My guess is that you are totally just guessing unless you have driven one of these.
The numbers are at full boost. I drove a 2.0t for awhile in a Range Rover Evoque and ultimately it was why I decided to cancel my 2.0t order. At WOT, yeah it can feel powerful. Most of the time, regular drivability, it will not be at full boost, so any quick throttle inputs will result in spooling and lag before the real power hits. And when the transmission starts trending towards eco focused, a pedal mash may not result in a downshift which means accelerating with limited boost. Feels weak.





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FUHL

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The numbers are at full boost. I drove a 2.0t for awhile in a Range Rover Evoque and ultimately it was why I decided to cancel my 2.0t order. At WOT, yeah it can feel powerful. Most of the time, regular drivability, it will not be at full boost, so any quick throttle inputs will result in spooling and lag before the real power hits. And when the transmission starts trending towards eco focused, a pedal mash may not result in a downshift which means accelerating with limited boost. Feels weak.
What year of Evoque? My wife's runs great, lots of pep.
 

RELBUS

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The numbers are at full boost. I drove a 2.0t for awhile in a Range Rover Evoque and ultimately it was why I decided to cancel my 2.0t order. At WOT, yeah it can feel powerful. Most of the time, regular drivability, it will not be at full boost, so any quick throttle inputs will result in spooling and lag before the real power hits. And when the transmission starts trending towards eco focused, a pedal mash may not result in a downshift which means accelerating with limited boost. Feels weak.
I totally disagree with this. My Turbo Rubicon will be my 4th turbo gas vehicle (8th turbo if we are including diesels) and I think the turbos are more fun to drive, and not just at WOT. The 3.6 makes slightly more torque off idle, by 1400 rpm the 2.0 surpasses it and does not look back. I would say its totally opposite of the picture you paint. The gasser makes its torque up high and needs to be wrung out, whereas the boosted motors deliver it down low and do not need to be wrung out. The 2.0 is making peak torque at more than 2000 rpm less than the 3.6. Just like most turbo vehicles, mild throttle inputs result in boost building and you feel the torque while the vehicle accelerates all without dropping a gear. More aggressive throttle inputs result in the vehicle dropping gears and building boost and it really takes off. ON a naturally aspirated vehicle when you roll into the throttle it barely accelerates, and once you give it enough input it drops a gear or gears and begins to accelerate harder.

Try it...Try to accelerate as hard as you can without allowing the transmission to downshift. Try it in a naturally aspirated vehicle, and then go try the same thing in a boosted vehicle. Which is more satisfying? Which way of driving is more in line with the "regular drivability" you reference above?
 

RELBUS

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To add to the above post, obviously as displacement increases those NA vehicles feel better and better...and when you add boost to higher displacement vehicles things just get better :hellcat:
 

aug0211

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Wow, there is NO WAY IN THE WORLD that I would buy a Jeep off the lot from that dealer. Those Jeeps probably have less than 10 miles on them... i.e. rings not broken in, and those idiots are drag racing them? There is another thread from months ago talking about proper break in. Drag racing any vehicle that hasn't been broken in is one of the dumbest things you can do.
I'm not trying to be dramatic here but that dealer is a total idiot. There was one thread on here where someone posted a video that two idiot salesmen posted of them flooring a brand new Jeep on public roads to see how quick they could run it up to 60MPH. One of the guys on the forum was going to let FCA know about the dealership.

If it were me, I'd go find another dealer.
I agree it’s dumb. But you also know that every dealer is doing this, right?

That’s why you form a relationship with them and let them know you don’t want it driven by anyone but yourself. Then you have to decide how much you trust them.

If you’re buying vehicles thinking this never happens... it’s probably happening to you :)
 
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mgroeger

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Sadly I agree. We bought ours off the lot and later realized we should have built it. Time will tell, usually if rings don't seat right you will burn oil later in life.
 

aug0211

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Sadly I agree. We bought ours off the lot and later realized we should have built it. Time will tell, usually if rings don't seat right you will burn oil later in life.
To your point, it's also not just dealers who are doing this.

How many people do you think test drive a vehicle and mash it to see how quick it is?
 

mgroeger

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I must confess I was one of them. As stated we wish we would have built. We have learned soooooo much since purchasing it. BUT... we don't regret it because it's the most freaking awesomest vehicle ever :) lol
 

Jzsquared

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TT13 how about a driving report I would like to know your thoughts about the 2.0 and if have a driven a 3.6 to compare
 

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Tina what fuel are you running in it? 87 or 91/93
 

BlackRook

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I totally disagree with this. My Turbo Rubicon will be my 4th turbo gas vehicle (8th turbo if we are including diesels) and I think the turbos are more fun to drive, and not just at WOT. The 3.6 makes slightly more torque off idle, by 1400 rpm the 2.0 surpasses it and does not look back. I would say its totally opposite of the picture you paint. The gasser makes its torque up high and needs to be wrung out, whereas the boosted motors deliver it down low and do not need to be wrung out. The 2.0 is making peak torque at more than 2000 rpm less than the 3.6. Just like most turbo vehicles, mild throttle inputs result in boost building and you feel the torque while the vehicle accelerates all without dropping a gear. More aggressive throttle inputs result in the vehicle dropping gears and building boost and it really takes off. ON a naturally aspirated vehicle when you roll into the throttle it barely accelerates, and once you give it enough input it drops a gear or gears and begins to accelerate harder.

Try it...Try to accelerate as hard as you can without allowing the transmission to downshift. Try it in a naturally aspirated vehicle, and then go try the same thing in a boosted vehicle. Which is more satisfying? Which way of driving is more in line with the "regular drivability" you reference above?
Sorry, regular drivability is highly situationally dependent. I've been driving turbo engines on and off since 2003, and after my last N/A car swore I was sticking to turbo. My Explorer has Ford's 3.5TT, and it's a monster. Had a great time tearing around in it for a while--until my commute changed. Now I need to go through a few intersections where there should be lights and aren't, and I need to pull forward hard from a stop. It's terrible; I have an underpowered V6 through the dangerous portion of the intersection, which lunges forward once I'm safe and don't need the power.

[Side Note: Do NOT ask about fuel economy. I was looking at a JK Rubi as an alternative to get better mpg, no lie I'm lucky to get 14mpg if I'm LIGHT on the pedal, and that's mixed driving--under 12 in city.]

Turbos are great, reliable, and here to stay. But the idea that they are flatly superior relies on artificially constructed scenarios as above--holding shifts? Who does that? If the transmission timing sucks or isn't set properly, the car will suck. If it's set right, an N/A car is VERY satisfying. Try driving a BMW E46 M3 with DSG if you want to talk satisfaction. And in a Jeep, where super low rpm crawl matters, the 3.6 has an advantage to a certain type of buyer.
 

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Modern vehicles have high tolerances and don’t require a break-in. It’s more of a break-in for the driver to get used to the vehicle. Porsche states 2,000 miles in their manual for break-in in the US market, and a lower amount in other markets. Yet this doesn’t stop them from selling their PEC track cars as CPO with full warranties despite that they were driven flat out on a circuit from less than 100 miles on the odometer.

For Jeep the manual even encourages full-throttle acceleration. What does “drive moderately” even mean? A car manufacturer could easily disable exceeding a certain RPM or speed during the break-in period, or add a screen during startup with a warning, if they really wanted their customers to follow a certain procedure. Some cars have launch control disabled until the car hits a certain number of miles. The fact that this is buried deep in the manual which few read suggests that it doesn’t really matter.

ENGINE BREAK-IN RECOMMENDATIONS
A long break-in period is not required for the engine and drivetrain (transmission and axle) in your vehicle.
Drive moderately during the first 300 miles (500 km). After the initial 60 miles (100 km), speeds up to 50 or 55 mph (80 or 90 km/h) are desirable.
While cruising, brief full-throttle acceleration within the limits of local traffic laws contributes to a good break-in. Wide-open throttle acceleration in low gear can be detri- mental and should be avoided.
The engine oil installed in the engine at the factory is a high-quality energy conserving type lubricant. Oil changes should be consistent with anticipated climate conditions under which vehicle operations will occur. For the recom- mended viscosity and quality grades, refer to “Dealer Service” in “Servicing And Maintenance”.
 
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TT13

TT13

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TT13 how about a driving report I would like to know your thoughts about the 2.0 and if have a driven a 3.6 to compare
Sorry, I didn’t even try the V6. It has a lot of pep, but I had to take it easy for the first 300 miles to break it in.
 

boon4376

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Still waiting for mine. I certainly hope is more then one car length. A Jeep JLU is 188 inches and at 60 mph the math is 0.18 sec.

If that is the case I should have went with the v6 and added a turbo after market.

I anybody talk about the drive, feel, start stop, etc.
It's easier to tune a turbo that's already on the vehicle than it is to add an aftermarket turbo. 4cyl vs 6cyl isn't really a big difference these days. It won't be long before people re-map the boost to hit at lower RPM, hit 325lb-ft of torque, and over 300HP which would just be stage 1 on all stock hardware.

Upgrade the intercooler, downpipe, and add a bigger turbo and you'll unlock even more... Then there are forged internals...

There are probably big torque limiters on first and second gear that could be easily lifted with a remap.
 

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