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Noisy Differential, 1st Jeep Issue at 51,000 miles

calemasters

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I have a 2021 JLURD. The Jeep has been problem free for 51,000 miles. I am very easy on the Jeep and very careful offroad. About a week ago, I began to notice a very faint whine from the rear differential. The whine noise began it increase with miles over the past week. It was most noticable between 16 and 60 mph and the frequency was proportional to vehicle speed. The noise on light load would change tone on coast down. I thought it was an issue with the ring and pinion or carrier bearing. Took the Jeep to the dealer on Monday thinking ring and pinion or worst case a new carrier assembly. Dealer called me Monday afternoon and said there was major metal debris throughout the differential. They contacted Jeep and Jeep wants the complete rear axle assembly replaced. That was a surprise since the Jeep was drivable and the noise was not that bad since I took the Jeep in as soon as I knew there was an issue.

Anyone else surprised by an unexpected Dana 44 rear differential/axle assemble failure?
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grimmjeeper

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Not really surprised.

There are a few potential issues with the new gen M220. It's not common to have problems but it's not unheard of either. You just happened to get one of the small number that failed early.
 

kah.mun.rah

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They replaced my entire rear axle for a rear locker sensor failure. For some reason they prefer replacing entire assemblies instead of individual parts.
 

grimmjeeper

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They replaced my entire rear axle for a rear locker sensor failure. For some reason they prefer replacing entire assemblies instead of individual parts.
When there's obvious significant failure, replacing the entire assembly is a good idea. If a machining flaw caused bearings to shred themselves, replacing bits will just lead to another failure.

The locker sensor triggering a full axle replacement was just bureaucracy being stupid.
 

bd100

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Happened to mine around 20K miles. The early warning sign was a hissing noise through the parking brake cable. They replaced the entire back axle. I now use 75W140 lube as recommended by the axle manufacturer, which may or may not matter.
 

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My narrow m220 had the LSD and axle shafts replaced at 20k miles.
 
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calemasters

calemasters

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Happened to mine around 20K miles. The early warning sign was a hissing noise through the parking brake cable. They replaced the entire back axle. I now use 75W140 lube as recommended by the axle manufacturer, which may or may not matter.
My rear axle is the Dana 44, M220, sales code DRF. I use Mopar 75W85, GL-5 lubricant.
 

FreedomFur

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I have the same issue with a front Dynatrac axle, super disappointing. Basically the fix is regearing. And there doesn’t seem to be a bad wear pattern but it is annoying as F.
 

Old Jeeper

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I have a 2021 JLURD. The Jeep has been problem free for 51,000 miles. I am very easy on the Jeep and very careful offroad. About a week ago, I began to notice a very faint whine from the rear differential. The whine noise began it increase with miles over the past week. It was most noticable between 16 and 60 mph and the frequency was proportional to vehicle speed. The noise on light load would change tone on coast down. I thought it was an issue with the ring and pinion or carrier bearing. Took the Jeep to the dealer on Monday thinking ring and pinion or worst case a new carrier assembly. Dealer called me Monday afternoon and said there was major metal debris throughout the differential. They contacted Jeep and Jeep wants the complete rear axle assembly replaced. That was a surprise since the Jeep was drivable and the noise was not that bad since I took the Jeep in as soon as I knew there was an issue.

Anyone else surprised by an unexpected Dana 44 rear differential/axle assemble failure?
Whine from the read diff is AGE OLD my friend, for as long as they have been building cars, nothing rare, just a matter of wear and starts that whine.

There is fix for it: You are going to need some coarse Hickory or Oak from a dead tree that has been sitting in sun for bit.

Now that you go that from your chainsaw buddy, mix in 90 wt gear oil. Put that in your diff, WHINE is gone!

Having said that, you might want to think about selling that Jeep in a couple of months. and when you do make sure they don't know where you live.

While I am on the subject of auto repairs I will pass on another shade tree repair:

Another thing that happens on some engines is that the crankshaft bearings wear out, and replacing them can be expensive. Well, what you do when those rods begin to knock is go down to a Feed and Tack store and pick up a bundle of harness leather. About $8 buck or so, and harness leather is tanned and oiled leather suitable for heavy-duty use, various repairs such as water well hand pumps, and replacing the bearings on the crankshaft that the rods are beginning to knock.

Get that harness leather and cut to ends meet when wrapped around the crank journal. Soak it in 90 wt oil beforehand. Pull off your crank-bearing support one at a time, wrap it around, and bolt it back up.

Gosh, that engine will purr like a kitten and run like a mouse on cotton. I do strongly suggest you sell your car in a couple of months and make sure he doesn't know where you live.

In the event any of you think I am KIDDING, I AM NOT, I have done both of these fixes on cars in my life.

As Hank Williams Jr said. "A Country Boy Can Survive"
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