No power after rest stop. Couldn't get to highway speed on onramp.

AZ-Chris

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Diesels run hotter than gassers. For years, Truckers have idled their engines when making simple refueling stops to mitigate heat soak.
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gerlbaum

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Huh, never heard anyone say that. My 98 Cummins has a 180 tstat. Lots of those guys are trying to get them to run hotter or put winter fronts on depending on where they live - and they used to idle them to keep the heat in. I think all these modern engines run pretty hot compared to 20 years ago. Check out the thermostat temp ranges of the 2.0t and 3.0t so not sure I agree they run any hotter than their gas counterparts.

I drove out of black canyon city at 4 pm with 110 heat and the warmest temp I saw was 233 pulling a 500 lb teardrop. I’ve not had the power loss issue but I’ve let it idle down for a bit before I shut it off. I’ve done it on all my diesels I’ve owned since my 98. I won’t idle this engine any longer than necessary because of the dpf. I’d think just following the manual would be sufficient since it was written by the engineers.

I do know diesels will get more efficient the warmer they run - all compression engines do. One common theme is everyone blames all the issues on the dpf lol.
 

AZ-Chris

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. . .
I do know diesels will get more efficient the warmer they run - all compression engines do . . .
This is why diesels run hotter than gassers.

The guys running winter grill blockers are using them to get the engine up to temperature more quickly in colder climates and keep them running warmer in low ambient temperatures. Lots of people use engine block heaters too, but that's to keep the block from getting too cold, oil flowing more easily and fuel from gelling.

If you are interested in learning more about the problems related to high oil temperatures, check out this thread on the JT Gladiator forum . . .

Next time you tow your teardrop up I-17 out of Black Canyon City (or the Beeline highway) watch your oil temperatures rise 20 degrees or more from the bottom of the hills to the top . . . temperatures rise AND fall quickly, but once oil temperatures rise to 250 degrees or more, engine derating is quite likely.
 
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This has been a very informative thread. I truly appreciate hearing everyone’s thoughts on this. I have been planning to place an order for a ‘22 diesel when it opens. I would love to see a vote of those participating in this as to whether you would buy the diesel again, and if not what engine would you get?
 

AZ-Chris

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I LOVE my EcoDiesel for the rock crawling ability and everyday driving (not that my Wrangler is an every day driver - because its not). I still have hopes of towing a ruggedized teardrop, but I will hold off on ordering one to my specifications until I know I have the oil temperature issue under control and hopefully BulletProof Diesel will provide a solution.

The heat soak problem, which I believe to be the problem this thread was started for, can be managed by people being more knowledgable about the idiosyncrasies of operating the EcoDiesel.
 

GtX

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Sounds like a great way to get your Jeep stolen, not to mention that leaving your car running unattended is illegal in most states.

Florida Statute 316.1975: A person driving or in charge of any motor vehicle may not permit it to stand unattended without first stopping the engine, locking the ignition, and removing the key. A vehicle may not be permitted to stand unattended upon any perceptible grade without stopping the engine and effectively setting the brake thereon and turning the front wheels to the curb or side of the street. A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.​
This would seem to make remote start illegal to use.
 

grimmjeeper

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This has been a very informative thread. I truly appreciate hearing everyone’s thoughts on this. I have been planning to place an order for a ‘22 diesel when it opens. I would love to see a vote of those participating in this as to whether you would buy the diesel again, and if not what engine would you get?
I absolutely would order a diesel again. I've only had mine for a few months but I've had it out on the trails in the mountains several times. Heading up I70 west out of Denver it just chugs right up the hill with no real effort. My 3.6 JK would be screaming at high RPM up the hill. And once I get to the trails it crawls over obstacles like a tractor.

The fuel mileage is also quite a bit better and that's a bonus. It probably won't pay for the upgrade cost of the engine/trans, but it's still worth it.

If something goes wrong, I'll replace it with another one.
 

diezselsmk

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First post but I have been a long time reader of this site. Lots of good info and peeps all around. I wanted to share something I have found on this issue. I tend to own more diesal vehicles then gasser so I have had my share of experiences. The Heat soak issue is not uncommon in the new DEF diesel. They run them hotter then the older generation to pass the emissions numbers they need. This way there using less def to burn the particulates out of the system. They achieve this by running smaller variable vane turbos and intercoolers among other meens.

To get to the point, I have had the limp mode affect me twice on slow crawl trails on hot days and once waiting in traffic setting there idle for some time. I have found that if you are rolling you can put the trans in neutral and pump the pedal and then put it back in drive. This only works if you are rolling but it does reset the limp mode that is being enforced on the throttle control sensor.

The heat build up in the small turbo and the undersized intercooler is triggering the Turbo variable vane sensor and forcing a limp mode scenario. the EGTs seem to build quickly when the the turbo is not spinning more then 10psi . A larger intercooler would help this issue out but I haven't seen to many offerings on this yet. any way I hope this helps someone who is jamming up an onramp and runs into this situation and are not forced to find the emergency lane.
 

MSparks909

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If you’re doing a highway trip with your Ecodiesel and need to make a fuel/bathroom/food stop, I highly recommend letting it idle before continuing on your way. This should mitigate a good number of heat soak issues since fluids are still circulating. Take your fob and lock the Jeep while it’s running if you’re nervous about someone taking it. Activating your fan on high manually (ala Tazer) when stopped for a break will also help cool things down. Again, leave the engine running while doing this.

Aside from that, cut open the hood vents if you’ve got a Rubicon (and cut slots in the hood liner or remove it completely) and wait to see if Bulletproof Diesel comes out with a larger aftermarket oil cooler.
 

BDinTX

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First post but I have been a long time reader of this site. Lots of good info and peeps all around. I wanted to share something I have found on this issue. I tend to own more diesal vehicles then gasser so I have had my share of experiences. The Heat soak issue is not uncommon in the new DEF diesel. They run them hotter then the older generation to pass the emissions numbers they need. This way there using less def to burn the particulates out of the system. They achieve this by running smaller variable vane turbos and intercoolers among other meens.

To get to the point, I have had the limp mode affect me twice on slow crawl trails on hot days and once waiting in traffic setting there idle for some time. I have found that if you are rolling you can put the trans in neutral and pump the pedal and then put it back in drive. This only works if you are rolling but it does reset the limp mode that is being enforced on the throttle control sensor.

The heat build up in the small turbo and the undersized intercooler is triggering the Turbo variable vane sensor and forcing a limp mode scenario. the EGTs seem to build quickly when the the turbo is not spinning more then 10psi . A larger intercooler would help this issue out but I haven't seen to many offerings on this yet. any way I hope this helps someone who is jamming up an onramp and runs into this situation and are not forced to find the emergency lane.
Heck of a good first post! I'd been wondering if a turbo blanket might help but if you're correct it would probably make things worse. Great tip and welcome to the forum!
 

driventoadventure

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First post but I have been a long time reader of this site. Lots of good info and peeps all around. I wanted to share something I have found on this issue. I tend to own more diesal vehicles then gasser so I have had my share of experiences. The Heat soak issue is not uncommon in the new DEF diesel. They run them hotter then the older generation to pass the emissions numbers they need. This way there using less def to burn the particulates out of the system. They achieve this by running smaller variable vane turbos and intercoolers among other meens.

To get to the point, I have had the limp mode affect me twice on slow crawl trails on hot days and once waiting in traffic setting there idle for some time. I have found that if you are rolling you can put the trans in neutral and pump the pedal and then put it back in drive. This only works if you are rolling but it does reset the limp mode that is being enforced on the throttle control sensor.

The heat build up in the small turbo and the undersized intercooler is triggering the Turbo variable vane sensor and forcing a limp mode scenario. the EGTs seem to build quickly when the the turbo is not spinning more then 10psi . A larger intercooler would help this issue out but I haven't seen to many offerings on this yet. any way I hope this helps someone who is jamming up an onramp and runs into this situation and are not forced to find the emergency lane.
Minor correction to help foster understanding -

Modern diesels run hotter not to pass emissions, but because the DEF allows them to run hotter. Running hotter provides large efficiency and power boosts, but consequently produces considerably (even exponentially) more NOx emissions. The DEF is a catalyst that then breaks down the excess NOx into Ammonia, N2 and H2O therefore providing an overall reduction in harmful emissions versus the less-efficient cooler-running diesels. The one place where any 'hotter to help emissions' occurs is when the DPF is burning fuel to clean itself - but that is a transient condition not normal condition. You are correct about adjusting engine temperatures to use less DEF, but that is where the EGR comes in that in certain engine conditions (which depend on the engine and how its engineers tuned the system as a whole) the system will recycle partially combusted engine gasses to lower engine temperatures and reduce NOx - at the expense of lower overall efficiency and power output. When the EGR is cycling open more, then it uses less DEF because the engine is not producing as much NOx.

(E) Interesting observation on the vane sensor being part of the limp mode issue. Could there be some weird coking or stalling issue when the vanes are at certain positions in low load and warm scenarios?
 

driventoadventure

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Heck of a good first post! I'd been wondering if a turbo blanket might help but if you're correct it would probably make things worse. Great tip and welcome to the forum!
As (e - your) linked Engineering Explained video points out, the blanket could help since it prevents thermal exchange between the exhaust and the inlet. However, the oil temperature consideration can't be discounted, since oil is the only thing cooling the turbo and one of the primary reasons that a person needs to provide a thermal cooling period for any turbo.
 

diezselsmk

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I was not trying to get to detailed with he emissions break down of the DEF systems but what driventoadventure response to this is correct. My observation of the egt temps pre turbine and after manifold are what I still believe the issue is. The EGR bypass is only there to regulate normal driving conditions and is not capable of venting a true thermal overheat condition. I had a 15 durmax that blew 3 vain sensors each while towing at speed on both flat and high incline roads. it turned out to be a bad turbo but the conditions are similar to what is going on here. Smaller turbos are more susceptible to over heat conditions just ask any import tuner out there. The key to turbo efficiency is its ability to receive cool air and dispel hot air. The DEF system is not flow efficient and the intercooler in my opinion is to small. Yes an oil cooler would help but I have not seen oil temps that far out of what I believe is normal for this motor. a turbo timer would be good for people who like to run hard and put away wet for lack of a better term otherwise cool down idle time is what is needed in most situations. I would not let this motor idle more then 5 min as I stated in my previous post it tends to not like conditions under 10 psi. This is a good thread I would like to see one started with some peeps who have guages like the banks monster with the temp monitoring add ons so we could see if this is isolated to a few or a nature of the beast.....

also one last note. those with a taszer if you go to the live setting and turn on the boost gauge you can see the variations when at idle or slow crawls on hot weather conditions. I do not believe the vanes are opening in a timely manner to alleviate boost drop. Or it could just be mine.
 

rayvonp

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First your jeep didn’t try to kill you and only an idiot would try to merge onto the freeway with no power next time stop before merging completely on the freeway
 
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