No power after rest stop. Couldn't get to highway speed on onramp.

UrbanCowboyAZ

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I had the same thing happen to me in Flagstaff in summer when the Jeep was new. I had been driving for a few hours and stopped for fuel. Got back on the freeway and had no power. Pulled over, restarted it, and it was all good again. Lesson learned to not jump on it after a long drive and quick stop. Also, I don’t recall, but I’m sure I should have let the vehicle idle a bit longer before shutter her down. A warning would be lovely though.
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gato

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Casey250 was going on a trip on a convoy of 2 Wrangler/Gladiators diesels. Both reached 118C temp and limited power - they couldn't go over 50MPH (80KM/h). Check out the youtube video. One was regered, the other not both experienced exactly the same issue at exactly the same time.
 

gato

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Here’s a question: What does eliminating the etorque system do to the car? All the 4 doors have some sort of hybrid system.
I don't think anyone is advocating "eliminating' the eTorque system from a vehicle built with it. Some may pref5 - er to not have it in the first place due to the extra weight and complexity (exposed heating and cooling lines running from the front of the vehicle to the battery back, etc).

You may be referring to eliminating the diesel emissions system. That is something that owners of modern diesels do, as eliminating them and retuning has a lot of advantages:
1 - No need to fill up the urea adBlue tanks - sames money, time weight.
2 - No need for all the heat, wasted fuel, degraded performance of DPF regen.
3 - Retune for increased power and performance.
4 - Cooler running engine.
5 - etc.
 

gerlbaum

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No, I was just curious if someone has pulled it off or if it could be simplified. My question wasn’t related to deleting a diesel. I haven’t seen a lot of older hybrids running around but that doesn’t mean they aren’t out there. It doesn’t seem like a simple system. I mean, what’s the reliability? I honestly don’t know. I’d rather have to replace a $1300 dpf in 9 years than have to figure out why a hybrid isn’t functioning correctly. But I’ve never turned a wrench on a hybrid. I was able to swap the test pipe and dpf filter on my 15 dodge 3500 in 2 hours. I had to do it every two years for emissions.
 

gerlbaum

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That being said, I don’t think any of the emissions stuff is related to the power loss issue. That discussion kind of derailed this thread.
 

gerlbaum

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I had the same thing happen to me in Flagstaff in summer when the Jeep was new. I had been driving for a few hours and stopped for fuel. Got back on the freeway and had no power. Pulled over, restarted it, and it was all good again. Lesson learned to not jump on it after a long drive and quick stop. Also, I don’t recall, but I’m sure I should have let the vehicle idle a bit longer before shutter her down. A warning would be lovely though.
Add a turbo timer.
 

Kurlon

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I haven’t seen a lot of older hybrids running around but that doesn’t mean they aren’t out there.
They're all over the place. I traded my 2006 Toyota Highlander Hybrid after 13 years and 230k miles because I didn't want to sink the cost of new catalytic converters into it. There are Priuses with all sorts of crazy odometer readings happily buzzing along.
 

AZ-Chris

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Casey250 was going on a trip on a convoy of 2 Wrangler/Gladiators diesels. Both reached 118C temp and limited power - they couldn't go over 50MPH (80KM/h). Check out the youtube video. One was regered, the other not both experienced exactly the same issue at exactly the same time.
Casey 250 experienced a different problem than what started this thread. Casey and the EPIC Gladiator experienced excessively high oil temperatures that resulted in derating the engine. The high oil temperatures are related to the high engine loads encountered when driving highway speeds on severe mountain grades (typically 7% grades at altitudes over 1K ft), frequently exacerbated by towing.

That being said, I don’t think any of the emissions stuff is related to the power loss issue. That discussion kind of derailed this thread.
The problem that started this thread, I believe, is also related to high engine temperatures (but not necessarily high oil temperatures) that cause the inlet air temperatures to exceed normal operating parameters. The diesel emission systems and turbo chargers are frequently blamed for contributing to this problem as the residual heat transfers to the engine compartment and gets trapped under the hood once the vehicle stops. Normally, for longer duration stops, the heat dissipates sufficiently where the inlet air under the hood has sufficiently cooled to the point engine operating conditions are not affected . . . not so when the stops are short.
 
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dbrford

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I had this happen after a short stop this weekend. It was not related to coolant, oil, trans temps, they all were at a lower temp than documented derates from towing and grades.

Temp outside was over 100f just coming out of Las Vegas, stop was roughly 10 minutes. Not a fun experience at all in my Jeep that I had just picked the day before.
 

gerlbaum

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Casey 250 experienced a different problem than what started this started this thread. Casey and the EPIC Gladiator experienced excessively high oil temperatures that resulted in derating the engine. The high oil temperatures are related to the high engine loads encountered when driving highway speeds on severe mountain grades (typically 7% grades at altitudes over 1K ft), frequently exacerbated by towing.



The problem that started this thread, I believe, are also related to high engine temperatures (but not necessarily high oil temperatures) that cause the inlet air temperatures to exceed normal operating parameters. The diesel emission systems and turbo chargers are frequently blamed for contributing to this problem as the residual heat transfers to the engine compartment and gets trapped under the hood once the vehicle stops. Normally, for longer duration stops, the heat dissipates sufficiently where the inlet air under the hood has sufficiently cooled to the point engine operating conditions are not affected . . . not so when the stops are short.
Still fail to see the relationship but I’m not an expert. Regardless a turbo timer would solve it. They’ve been around forever then you don’t need to worry about the shut down time because it will do it for you based on temp. They’ve been around since before diesel emissions because you were never supposed to shut a turbo engine off while it was still hot to prevent oil build up in the turbo.
 

gerlbaum

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I normally turn auto off, off. To me, logic would dictate if you keep it enabled it won’t shut the diesel down until certain parameters are met. Therefore, couldn’t one keep it enabled, put it in park, lock the doors, and run into a store? If parameters are met it would shut down while you’re in the store. If not, you would come back out to a running vehicle.

Anyway, I’m just think out loud.
 

AZ-Chris

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When the inlet air temperature is outside the normal engine operating parameters, the computer cannot (and does not) get enough oxygen into the cylinders for proper combustion. The air trapped under the hood during a stop soaks into all the plumbing lines in the engine and heats the inlet air beyond normal parameters. Had the engine been left to idle, rather than shut off, the fan would have moved the hot air out of the engine compartment so that the heat soak wouldn't be as severe.

Heat soak, I believe, is also what causes the power steering pump to overheat when rock crawling. I just encountered this problem recently on the trail. Fortunately, I was able to activate the Cooldown Mode provided by the Tazer JL Mini which just turns the engine fan on high, overriding what the engine computer would normally do.
 

gato

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Casey 250 experienced a different problem than what started this thread. Casey and the EPIC Gladiator experienced excessively high oil temperatures that resulted in derating the engine. The high oil temperatures are related to the high engine loads encountered when driving highway speeds on severe mountain grades (typically 7% grades at altitudes over 1K ft), frequently exacerbated by towing.
Different symptoms, but both related to heat management failures. I.e. the engine could not shed heat sufficiently and power was pulled from the driver.

Casey250 and EPIC were not towing and they could not get past 50MPH, outside temp was ˜90F, the Jeeps had gear but no passengers. Still got to the point that power was pulled from the driver and the similarly equipped gasoline Jeeps/vehicles just blew past them and kept going normally.

No matter how you cut it, there are simply too many stories of heat management with the Jeep's diesel engine, leading to power loss.

 

AZ-Chris

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Both the Casey 250 and EPIC Gladiator are running heavy (beyond the rated GVWR). When their engines derated, they were on a steep highway mountain pass and their oil temperatures (and probably coolant) were beyond normal operational parameters. Since adding my lift and 37s, I have been very close to these parameters myself (oil temperature of 251 F), but fortunately have yet to have my engine derate. I'm not towing either, but towing will make matters much worse.

I have personally discussed this very video and the high oil temperature problem with the folks at BulletProof Diesel and they are actively working on developing an auxiliary oil cooler. BulletProof Diesel has purchased a Diesel Gladiator to serve as a test mule/development platform.
 

gerlbaum

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No matter how you cut it, there are simply too many stories of heat management with the Jeep's diesel engine, leading to power loss.
People with the 2.0t are having similar issues. Heat issue with turbo engines.
 
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