Newbie to Lifts

Deepc408

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Hello Fellow Jeepers!

I am looking to lift my stock 2020 Sahara. I admit im a newbie to this.

Questions I have :

1) Is it better to go with a Mopar 2.5" lift installed by a Mopar service department or go with another lift kit and installer?

2) With a 2.5" Lift, can I still use stock Sahara wheels and rims? Will it look funky?

3) By lifting the Jeep, does it affect MPG? Roll over risk?





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702SaharaJL

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Hello Fellow Jeepers!

I am looking to lift my stock 2020 Sahara. I admit im a newbie to this.

Questions I have :

1) Is it better to go with a Mopar 2.5" lift installed by a Mopar service department or go with another lift kit and installer?

2) With a 2.5" Lift, can I still use stock Sahara wheels and rims? Will it look funky?

3) By lifting the Jeep, does it affect MPG? Roll over risk?
Personally, I went with the Mopar lift and had the dealer install it to not mess with any warranty's. I would definitely upgrade your wheels and tires as well..The stock wheels would look funny IMO with the lift. I went with 37's.

And Im not too sure if it increases the rollover risk.

There's a lot of options out there, have fun shopping!
 
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Deepc408

Deepc408

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Personally, I went with the Mopar lift and had the dealer install it to not mess with any warranty's. I would definitely upgrade your wheels and tires as well..The stock wheels would look funny IMO with the lift. I went with 37's.

And Im not too sure if it increases the rollover risk.

There's a lot of options out there, have fun shopping!
Thank you!! Did you end up getting the 2" lift or more? How did you feel before and after the lifft? Any difference in ride quality?
 

Fonzilla85

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What type of use are you planning to get out of your rig? I’d say run some trials stock, that way you can get an idea as to how much lift and what additional components may be beneficial.
I’m running the Dynatrac 2” lift, somewhat similar to the mopar lift. These setups are solid for a weekend warrior like myself. If you need something a bit more advance, I’d say look into Metalcloak or Rock Krawler, they have really good systems, no knock on any other companies as these are the only ones I’ve considered and researched.
The wheels will look small with a lifted rig, so just some to think about. Again, just my take, I’m sure some of the more knowledgeable members will add and fill in any necessary info.
 

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Hello Fellow Jeepers!

I am looking to lift my stock 2020 Sahara. I admit im a newbie to this.

Questions I have :

1) Is it better to go with a Mopar 2.5" lift installed by a Mopar service department or go with another lift kit and installer?

2) With a 2.5" Lift, can I still use stock Sahara wheels and rims? Will it look funky?

3) By lifting the Jeep, does it affect MPG? Roll over risk?
Welcome! Sorry in advance for the novel.
To answer your questions:
1). I may be biased, but I wouldn't bother with Mopar. A lot of people hype it up, but I've seen those same people in passing 6 months later on the forum mentioning they're buying parts from several manufacturers to correct issues with the Mopar lift (steering geometry, death wobble, noises, etc). Ultimately, you get what you pay for, so you want to go with a properly engineered lift from a quality manufacturer. I hear people saying "I don't plan on doing a lot of hardcore off roading", all the time, and then they cheap out on a lift so they can spend $3k on tires and fancy rims. Don't be one of those people. if you spend the money on properly engineered kit from a quality manufacturer, it will ride better than stock and last longer as well.

Off the top of my head, quality manufacturers I've dealt with IRL and I've seen enough good, thorough reviews on to recommend: Rock Krawler, MetalCloak, Clayton, Evo being the best based on completeness of the kit, handling and performance. Personally, Rock Krawler are local to me and i've used them on my TJ's so I'll be going with them when the time comes. They have a few different kits for each level, but it basically boils down to Adventure Series or XFactor. Adventure series is "Service Free" joints with 70 degrees misalignment (flex), and XFactor is heim joints with Jam Nuts that offer 90 degrees Misalignment. I've used XFactor in the past and LOVED it for performance, but since I'm in the rust belt and this Jeep is a daily driver, I'm probably going Adventure series this time around. Whatever you decide, make sure you use an installer that is approved by your suspension manufacturer.

And no, aftermarket parts won't void your warranty- if your dealer says so, they have no idea what they're talking about; They can refuse to work on modified vehicles (as their policy), but under the Magnusson Moss act, they would have to prove the aftermarket parts were the direct result of the breakage. That said: dealers and OEM's know they can bury you in court and will fight you every step of the way. It's rarely an issue if you're familiar with off roading and working on/ modifying your vehicle, however it is something to be wary.

2). If you go 2.5" lift, you'll probably want to upgrade tires. for 2.5" most people will go to 35x12.5x167R (315/70/17R or whatever the metric equivalent is). Some will go 37's but that may be overkill for you.

If you want to keep stock wheels, you'll likely need spacers. I believe 1.75" spacers for 12.5" wide tires are what most people run. If you're going with new wheels, Backspacing should be 4-4.5" for 12.5" tires, if I recall correctly. I'm currently going through this same debate: I like my OEM Rubi wheels but I think I can get more functionality out of some aftermarket ones.

3). Yes. By lifting a vehicle, you're adding ground clearance at the cost of raising the center of gravity (usually). This may technically make the vehicle more prone to rollovers. That said, a Wrangler isn't a sports car. Drive it like the big box on big wheels it is and not a Lamborghini and you should be fine. A quality engineered suspension kit should also help on road manners as well. a $500 lift kit will handle and perform like $500, a $3k kit will handle and perform like a $3k kit. I've had both and can vouch for that. I made the mistake of going with a $500 kit on one of my old TJ's and while it was OK, and got me down the trail, it had a real rough, somewhat twitchy ride on the street, and lifted wheels all the time off road. My other TJ had a $3k Long arm Kit and that thing handled amazing. I could take on ramps at 50mph on 33" tires, and Fully flex my suspension off road to keep tires on the ground and keep the wheels moving.

Your MPG will also likely drop because you're raising your center of gravity (more wind resistance) and larger tires (which means more rolling mass). Depending on how large you go, you can regear to help a little bit, but ultimately it is a bit of a losing battle, because physics.

Something to also keep in mind: Whenever you lift a vehicle, any issues present may be amplified. Again, I found this out the hard way with my $500 kit on one of my past TJ's.

I know it sounds a bit harsh and bleak, but I've loved every Jeep I've ever owned, and have routinely left my various "daily drivers" home to drive the Jeeps- to the point where when I had to consolidate? The Jeeps always won. And whenever it came time to buy again? Wrangler was the first (and only) vehicle I would consider. Because I love big, stupid, 4x4 hot wheels. If you treat it right and build it right, it will last forever and go anywhere.

Hope this helps.
 
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Deepc408

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Welcome! Sorry in advance for the novel.
To answer your questions:
1). I may be biased, but I wouldn't bother with Mopar. A lot of people hype it up, but I've seen those same people in passing 6 months later on the forum mentioning they're buying parts from several manufacturers to correct issues with the Mopar lift (steering geometry, death wobble, noises, etc). Ultimately, you get what you pay for, so you want to go with a properly engineered lift from a quality manufacturer. I hear people saying "I don't plan on doing a lot of hardcore off roading", all the time, and then they cheap out on a lift so they can spend $3k on tires and fancy rims. Don't be one of those people. if you spend the money on properly engineered kit from a quality manufacturer, it will ride better than stock and last longer as well.

Off the top of my head, quality manufacturers I've dealt with IRL and I've seen enough good, thorough reviews on to recommend: Rock Krawler, MetalCloak, Clayton, Evo being the best based on completeness of the kit, handling and performance. Personally, Rock Krawler are local to me and i've used them on my TJ's so I'll be going with them when the time comes. They have a few different kits for each level, but it basically boils down to Adventure Series or XFactor. Adventure series is "Service Free" joints with 70 degrees misalignment (flex), and XFactor is heim joints with Jam Nuts that offer 90 degrees Misalignment. I've used XFactor in the past and LOVED it for performance, but since I'm in the rust belt and this Jeep is a daily driver, I'm probably going Adventure series this time around. Whatever you decide, make sure you use an installer that is approved by your suspension manufacturer.

And no, aftermarket parts won't void your warranty- if your dealer says so, they have no idea what they're talking about; They can refuse to work on modified vehicles (as their policy), but under the Magnusson Moss act, they would have to prove the aftermarket parts were the direct result of the breakage. That said: dealers and OEM's know they can bury you in court and will fight you every step of the way. It's rarely an issue if you're familiar with off roading and working on/ modifying your vehicle, however it is something to be wary.

2). If you go 2.5" lift, you'll probably want to upgrade tires. for 2.5" most people will go to 35x12.5x167R (315/70/17R or whatever the metric equivalent is). Some will go 37's but that may be overkill for you.

If you want to keep stock wheels, you'll likely need spacers. I believe 1.75" spacers for 12.5" wide tires are what most people run. If you're going with new wheels, Backspacing should be 4-4.5" for 12.5" tires, if I recall correctly. I'm currently going through this same debate: I like my OEM Rubi wheels but I think I can get more functionality out of some aftermarket ones.

3). Yes. By lifting a vehicle, you're adding ground clearance at the cost of raising the center of gravity (usually). This may technically make the vehicle more prone to rollovers. That said, a Wrangler isn't a sports car. Drive it like the big box on big wheels it is and not a Lamborghini and you should be fine. A quality engineered suspension kit should also help on road manners as well. a $500 lift kit will handle and perform like $500, a $3k kit will handle and perform like a $3k kit. I've had both and can vouch for that. I made the mistake of going with a $500 kit on one of my old TJ's and while it was OK, and got me down the trail, it had a real rough, somewhat twitchy ride on the street, and lifted wheels all the time off road. My other TJ had a $3k Long arm Kit and that thing handled amazing. I could take on ramps at 50mph on 33" tires, and Fully flex my suspension off road to keep tires on the ground and keep the wheels moving.

Your MPG will also likely drop because you're raising your center of gravity (more wind resistance) and larger tires (which means more rolling mass). Depending on how large you go, you can regear to help a little bit, but ultimately it is a bit of a losing battle, because physics.

Something to also keep in mind: Whenever you lift a vehicle, any issues present may be amplified. Again, I found this out the hard way with my $500 kit on one of my past TJ's.

I know it sounds a bit harsh and bleak, but I've loved every Jeep I've ever owned, and have routinely left my various "daily drivers" home to drive the Jeeps- to the point where when I had to consolidate? The Jeeps always won. And whenever it came time to buy again? Wrangler was the first (and only) vehicle I would consider. Because I love big, stupid, 4x4 hot wheels. If you treat it right and build it right, it will last forever and go anywhere.

Hope this helps.
Very helpful insight!! I appreciate you writing this. Based on what I am reading, I will do a bit more research and test some trails to see what lift kit would work best for me. Will update once I get more input :)
 

Terminex

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I have a sahara and went through the same thoughts as you. Here is the process i went through.

1: immediately bought some rubicon wheels, synergy wheel spacers, and 35” falken wildpeak at3w tires. Figured I’ll drive it like it is and just enjoy it until the warranty expires.

2: two days later i bought a rubicon suspension & installed it with 1/2” front spacers.

3: 2 weeks later IInstalled the longer front lower control arms from the mopar 2” lift kit.

4: installed adjustable track bars front & rear since my axles were about 1” more to the driver side than passenger side.

5: after debating for about 12 month i installed the rancho 2.5/ 3.5 sport lift. (It is the same kit, just nets 2.5” lift on a rubicon, 3.5” on a non Rubi. I also installed teraflex Alpine IR front lower & rear upper adjustable control arms. (Also did the rancho spring perches)

6: after a month i went ahead and installed the rancho geometry correction brackets. (Not required since the adjustable control arms corrected the caster, but i wanted to fix the angle of the arms for a better ride & handling)

7: realized i had 750k in hilton points that were expiring, so i traded in the points for front upper & rear lower alpine IR adjustable control arms.

8: even though i have the replacement steel steering box, i still wasn’t happy with the steering. I added a synergy drag link, and a rusty’s track bar brace.

Now, a couple items about why i made some of the brand / part choices i made.

-Ranch lift for 2 important reasons
1: i wanted adjustable shocks, and have been VERY happy with the Rancho RS9000XL shocks in everything i have used them in. (Just be sure to remove, grease, and reinstall the adjusters before you install the shocks)
2: the Rancho lift gave me a reasonable height lift for a very good value.

once you start doing your research you will quickly realize that most “budget” lifts do not really include everything you will need. (Need is going to be subjective to every person)

i think you need the relocation brackets or the front lower control arms, and you also need rear upper adjustable control arms.

i also think you need to measure both axles for center and will most likely need front & rear adjustable track bars.

I went with the Teraflex Alpine IR for the control arms because I love the IR capability. The IR allows smoother control arm movement, and great flex. The thing that i REALLY love though, is that with the IR bushings you can torque everything while the jeep is on jacks / stands. Everything else you have to be on the ground and level so that the bushings are not bound up in the wrong position.



i was turned off by multiple things on the Mopar lift. I think it is dramatically overpriced for what you get. It is well known that the lower control arms in the kit are not long enough. There are still many dealers that see the lift and will give you trouble even though “it is a Mopar lift”.

With what i know now, i am not sure what i would change if anything.

i like the Teraflex alpine IR control arms more than any other options out ther, but i do not think i would be interested in their full lift, as the adjustable shocks are VERY expensive, and most people seem to agree that they are REALLY stiff.

The most important takeaway i learned from the entire process is to always remember that EVERY thing you touch on the suspension is part of the steering geometry equation. I.e. a lift without relo brackets or control arms changes caster. Even with control arms it will change axle center unless you have all 4 adjustable control arms. If you do adjustable control arms instead of brackets, you change how the axle absorbs bumps in the road. This in turn changes the feel of the shocks. You also need to ensure that your shocks are properly matched to the springs, and that both are a match for the weight of your vehicle.

sorry, didn’t mean to write a novel.....
 

RubiSc0tt

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Very helpful insight!! I appreciate you writing this. Based on what I am reading, I will do a bit more research and test some trails to see what lift kit would work best for me. Will update once I get more input :)
Also worth mentioning: I try to tell everyone to drive it stock first. It will teach you to be a better driver. Line choice is more important when you're closer to the ground. I've had mine for about 2 years now, I've gotten out to Rausch Creek once, and it gave me a good enough feel to get used to this Jeep (which is massive compared to my little TJ's). I'm starting the plan to go to 37's but the way my Jeep is set up and wheels in stock form, I could easily leave it alone for a while and still have a lot of fun.
 

hijinx

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Also worth mentioning: I try to tell everyone to drive it stock first. It will teach you to be a better driver. Line choice is more important when you're closer to the ground. I've had mine for about 2 years now, I've gotten out to Rausch Creek once, and it gave me a good enough feel to get used to this Jeep (which is massive compared to my little TJ's). I'm starting the plan to go to 37's but the way my Jeep is set up and wheels in stock form, I could easily leave it alone for a while and still have a lot of fun.
Heyyyy. I don’t mean to butt into the talk here but you seem VERY informed on suspension/wheels!

i have been searching all over for what I would need to lift my JLUR, and it’s hard. I don’t know much about the stuff, but I’m trying to learn but can’t find the setup I’d need. I don’t think?

I have a 20 JLU Rubicon Recon and I’m looking to put a 3.5” lift and 37s on it. With the 3.5” am I going to need long arms? I was thinking of going with the Teraflex Sport ST3 with falcon Monotubes as it seems to have everything I’d need, at least I THINK.

I was also checking out the MC Game Changer.

Anyhow, I keep finding different things on this, and thought I would ask you, since that novel you wrote was SUPER informative! Just not for a rubicon 😂 Also your name, so I figured you’d know about Rubis lol.
 

RubiSc0tt

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Heyyyy. I don’t mean to butt into the talk here but you seem VERY informed on suspension/wheels!

i have been searching all over for what I would need to lift my JLUR, and it’s hard. I don’t know much about the stuff, but I’m trying to learn but can’t find the setup I’d need. I don’t think?

I have a 20 JLU Rubicon Recon and I’m looking to put a 3.5” lift and 37s on it. With the 3.5” am I going to need long arms? I was thinking of going with the Teraflex Sport ST3 with falcon Monotubes as it seems to have everything I’d need, at least I THINK.

I was also checking out the MC Game Changer.

Anyhow, I keep finding different things on this, and thought I would ask you, since that novel you wrote was SUPER informative! Just not for a rubicon 😂 Also your name, so I figured you’d know about Rubis lol.
I only know because I did it wrong so many times with my first Jeep, I eventually got it right. That poor Jeep....

anyway I recently had a similar question, being that most of my knowledge is in TJ's. so, I got you covered. Give it a read.
quick advice based on my research:
-37's shouldn't need 3.5".
- I always recommend Rock Krawler as they're local to me and I've known them for years, but the MetalCloak stuff is on par with them. Nothing really wrong with Teraflex either, i just know RK/MC are pretty much industry leaders in my experience (IRL, reading forum reviews from experienced users, etc).
-Long arm kits are designed for more flex/ better handling. I loved the Long arm on my TJ, but with the JLUR platform- I don't really NEED one (Yet. I guess). Any other questions, I'll do the best I can to answer. There's a lot of really excellent knowledge on this forum.
 
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hijinx

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I only know because I did it wrong so many times with my first Jeep, I eventually got it right. That poor Jeep....

anyway I recently had a similar question, being that most of my knowledge is in TJ's. so, I got you covered. Give it a read.
quick advice based on my research:
-37's shouldn't need 3.5".
- I always recommend Rock Krawler as they're local to me and I've known them for years, but the MetalCloak stuff is on par with them. Nothing really wrong with Teraflex either, i just know RK/MC are pretty much industry leaders in my experience (IRL, reading forum reviews from experienced users, etc).
-Long arm kits are designed for more flex/ better handling. I loved the Long arm on my TJ, but with the JLUR platform- I don't really NEED one (Yet. I guess). Any other questions, I'll do the best I can to answer. There's a lot of really excellent knowledge on this forum.
Thanks! I read that article. I have searched the forums and Google and like everything is so all over. It’s hard to find exact info. Most of what I find is for the JLU not rubicons. Which doesn’t help because I have different parts that are stronger in areas so I don’t always have to do what the sports are doing. I’m just not versed in suspension well enough to know exactly what those parts are haha

edit: the link you posted says it can’t be found
 

RubiSc0tt

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Thanks! I read that article. I have searched the forums and Google and like everything is so all over. It’s hard to find exact info. Most of what I find is for the JLU not rubicons. Which doesn’t help because I have different parts that are stronger in areas so I don’t always have to do what the sports are doing. I’m just not versed in suspension well enough to know exactly what those parts are haha

edit: the link you posted says it can’t be found
Weird. This is the thread:
https://www.jlwranglerforums.com/forum/threads/2-5-lift-what-do-i-need-to-do.64322/
 

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