New Jeep Wrangler to include gasoline, diesel, mild hybrid, full hybrid

AVENTUS

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Concerns about anything new are legit. I love my '64 Willys Wagon, but electrics are coming. Sealing for water crossing would be a solvable challenge. Electric powertrains are so much simpler than the gas ones we are all used to. And the performance - wow. Two words: instant torque!

What would be cool is a plug-in hybrid Jeep. You drive it to the trailhead in hybrid-electric mode (many EVs now have an "EV later" button) and then switch over to EV mode for the trail.
the "aluminum air" batteries will finally make capacity and cost low enough to do away with fossil fuels In a decade or so
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The Great Grape Ape

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Possibly, but Aluminium batteries are not 'rechargeable' in the traditional sense, so you would need to swap out components at a re-fueling station of some kind to swap out anodes every 600-1000 miles. Not sure how attractive that is as an alternative, requiring another network of stations, etc.
Easy fire & forget aspect to plug-in hybrid that can use household power, grid power or existing fuelling stations keeps it as the most attractive solution for the foreseeable future, but 2030 may be a completly different story.

Storage capable body panels also helps in possibly greatly extending the range of existing technology until they can better figure out replacement tech like Al-air.

http://www.compositesworld.com/articles/composites-in-class-a-body-panels-integrating-energy-storage
 

AVENTUS

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Possibly, but Aluminium batteries are not 'rechargeable' in the traditional sense, so you would need to swap out components at a re-fueling station of some kind to swap out anodes every 600-1000 miles. Not sure how attractive that is as an alternative, requiring another network of stations, etc.
Easy fire & forget aspect to plug-in hybrid that can use household power, grid power or existing fuelling stations keeps it as the most attractive solution for the foreseeable future, but 2030 may be a completly different story.

Storage capable body panels also helps in possibly greatly extending the range of existing technology until they can better figure out replacement tech like Al-air.

http://www.compositesworld.com/articles/composites-in-class-a-body-panels-integrating-energy-storage
from what I read, FUJI's NEW "aluminum air" batteries are rechargeable.
 

The Great Grape Ape

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from what I read, FUJI's NEW "aluminum air" batteries are rechargeable.
Fuji talked about ionic solutions in the fall, but I have seen no follow-up publishing of success in that respect.

They still haven't figured out anode decay though even with the ionic solution, it just slows the rate of decay meaning you'd still need to swap after X number of discharges, and they would become progressively less efficient over time meaning the last few charges might only get you 20% (some saying 13% after 5 cycles). The current implementations seem best fit as very long life low draw battery for backup applications or single time use acting like Super Alkalines.

Still seem a while off for multiple discharge/charge cycles.

Their current solution for Al corrosion is still to have a removable Anode you could swap out after X distance and replace with fresh untis, which is doable, but still a bit of a pain, especially when were talking about multiple anodes per vehicle. Heck people moan about simple things like DEF, I don't think anything requiring more than pulling out one single box/slab/whatever would gain wider acceptance.

Also they are nowhere near those theoretical maxes that attract people to the platform, in large KW implementations needed for things like EV cars it requires way more cells than current Li-ion.

It may be the future, but like I said, that's a 2030s era option, not something in the life of a JL, I'd suspect a Hydrogen JL befor Al-air battery powered option.
 

AVENTUS

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1. Is there a definitive timeline for the full hybrid ?

2. Does this full hybrid have the ability to have each half of the system operate independently ?
----battery can power Wrangler fully and small 4cyl engine can stay off.
----small 4cyl can power vehicle fully when battery is drained.

3. Is there a timeline for a full electric Wrangler with no 4cyl in it ?
 

nemesis

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Imagine the range anxiety when guys are off road in wilderness in their electric Jeep lol.
I wouldn't mind seeing an HEV Wrangler with an electric motor on each hub (negating the complex gearbox and traction control) and a highly efficient 3-5kw diesel generator constantly charging the battery pack and also offering a source of 120/240v power for camping and site work.
 

AVENTUS

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I wouldn't mind seeing an HEV Wrangler with an electric motor on each hub (negating the complex gearbox and traction control) and a highly efficient 3-5kw diesel generator constantly charging the battery pack and also offering a source of 120/240v power for camping and site work.
This is the best idea I've read here in quite a while !!!!!
 

DanW

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Isn't this basically how the Chevy volt works?
Exactly. That's how a locomotive works, too. It could be a torque monster! The problem is that it would be incredibly expensive to build right now. Costs would have to come way down to make it practical.
 
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