New “Specialty” Jeeps

TrailScooter

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Just returned from a week in Moab; saw a Jeep sponsored Level 2 charger with a solar panel to off set some of the electrical costs. "...times, they are a changing..."

I fear change. It's, so, different. How do you rev an EV to impress the ladies. Where do you put the high rise fuel injected turbo chargers. To that point, what sticks out of the hood and shakes around to get all those Tim Allen grunts from your friends.

Then there's the "I lost because I got a tank of bad electricity".. How does that work?


No! Change is bad. You'd know this if you ever had a child. I'd do almost anything to get out of changing.
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displayname

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Just returned from a week in Moab; saw a Jeep sponsored Level 2 charger with a solar panel to off set some of the electrical costs. "...times, they are a changing..."
I do wonder if those will still be there in 3-5 years. Or if they'll still have a Jeep logo.
 

pnut

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Well, I know I’m an old guy and not “kewl”, but frankly the new “specialty” Jeeps are something I totally fail to get. You’ve got the 4XE and the 392. Both cost more money ( a 392 a LOT more money), burn more fuel (4XE is significantly worse than the 2.0 or 3.6 when running the engine). The hybrid also adds a ton of complexity, and I’m sure your insurance agent will be your new best buddy when you insure the 392😏. I just don’t see the point of either option. Neither will do anything that a regular gasser won’t do (ok, the 392 will wear out tires faster when doing burnouts😏), neither will go places lower models won’t. The top speed of the hot rod is still only 99 mph... unless a guy is just driven to have something “different” and has a lot of money to throw away I can’t figure what the “gain” would be to owning either model. The hybrid “might” have an edge is you commute in yours daily and the total trip is under 20 miles, but you’re dragging around a lot of extra weight and a lot of electrical and mechanical complexity to get that short 20 mile “gas free” trip. My 2.0 has consistently been mid 20’s on combined roads and I can baby it and hit 30. (I don’t, but I have just to see if I could). Anyway, different strokes for different folks I guess, but both models to me look like solutions in search of a problem😳. YMMV
It's all about personal taste, what are your priorities when buying any vehicle, and I'm sure what you can afford too.

Why does one person buy a Prius, and another a Jeep? Same even within Jeeps, why some people adore the soft top, but others will never take off the hard top. All about what turns your crank.

PS - I just bought a 392 with the sky top, and it's everything I ever wanted in a Jeep.
 

TBULL52

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I traded my 2018 JLUR for a 2021 JLUR 4Xe and I couldn't be happier. The extra 100HP was my main reason for buying it and It has been worth every penny. Add that to the fact that I paid 47,500 for the 2018 and got 46,200 for it in trade plus a 7500 tax rebate and the decision was simple. The acceleration on the 4Xe is night and day better than the 3.6 JLUR. I made if 565 miles on my first full (17 gallons) tank of gas. So the gas savings will be significant, I do charge it just about everyday and have calculated that cost to be about $26 a month added to the utility bill. But honestly I wouldn't care if this thing only got the 17 MPG that I was getting with the 2018 JLUR 3.6, the extra acceleration adds so much to the enjoyment of driving this jeep. It's faster, quieter, and handles better (I'm assuming because of the lower center of gravity). I have not had it off road yet but all reviews say that it is amazing. I do realize there is some risk with the new technology (atleast new to Wranglers) but there were risk when I bought my 2018 JLUR in March of 2018 as it was an "All New" Jeep at the time. In closing as with everything Jeep, to each his/her own. Make it yours and enjoy it
 

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Wind is a disaster and the acres of solar panels are not the answer either. But nice try, keep trying to make me feel guilty I'm sure when I'm 80 I'll give a shit.
No one's trying to "make you feel guilty", but we are trying to point out the fallacies you've bought into and continue to perpetuate. Not sure where you're seeing "wind being a disaster". Well, unless you believe the propaganda that TX is shoving about the boondoggle of their grid. Renewables and green is more than just wind and solar, but they certainly are big parts of replacing fossil fuel generation.
 

plex

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My uncle used to say no way he is going to buy an ABS-equipped car, because "no stinky electrics can pump the brakes faster than I do".

He still grunt till this day because all cars are equipped with ABS, in fact almost all motorcycles do now.

I know, change is hard.
 

RedundanT

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No one's trying to "make you feel guilty", but we are trying to point out the fallacies you've bought into and continue to perpetuate. Not sure where you're seeing "wind being a disaster". Well, unless you believe the propaganda that TX is shoving about the boondoggle of their grid. Renewables and green is more than just wind and solar, but they certainly are big parts of replacing fossil fuel generation.
Take a walk near a midwest wind farm and count the dead birds. Tidal energy will work great in the fly over states. LOL No such thing as "green" energy. Yes we need something to replace fossil fuels, the answer just isn't here yet.
 

csjlu

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Take a walk near a midwest wind farm and count the dead birds. Tidal energy will work great in the fly over states. LOL No such thing as "green" energy. Yes we need something to replace fossil fuels, the answer just isn't here yet.
Legitimate point made, and I agree that no clean energy source exists. It's about minimizing the impact, where possible. But if tidal works on the coasts, it does free up capacity to use more fossil inland. As for bird mortality adjusted for kilowatt hour of electricity generated, a prelim study suggests that fossil does not fair as well as wind.

The study estimates that wind farms and nuclear power stations are responsible each for between 0.3 and 0.4 fatalities per gigawatt-hour (GWh) of electricity while fossil-fueled power stations are responsible for about 5.2 fatalities per GWh....The paper concludes that further study is needed, but also that fossil-fueled power stations appear to pose a much greater threat to avian wildlife than wind and nuclear power technologies.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421509001074
 

Mark D

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Well, I know I’m an old guy and not “kewl”, but frankly the new “specialty” Jeeps are something I totally fail to get. You’ve got the 4XE and the 392. Both cost more money ( a 392 a LOT more money), burn more fuel (4XE is significantly worse than the 2.0 or 3.6 when running the engine). The hybrid also adds a ton of complexity, and I’m sure your insurance agent will be your new best buddy when you insure the 392😏. I just don’t see the point of either option. Neither will do anything that a regular gasser won’t do (ok, the 392 will wear out tires faster when doing burnouts😏), neither will go places lower models won’t. The top speed of the hot rod is still only 99 mph... unless a guy is just driven to have something “different” and has a lot of money to throw away I can’t figure what the “gain” would be to owning either model. The hybrid “might” have an edge is you commute in yours daily and the total trip is under 20 miles, but you’re dragging around a lot of extra weight and a lot of electrical and mechanical complexity to get that short 20 mile “gas free” trip. My 2.0 has consistently been mid 20’s on combined roads and I can baby it and hit 30. (I don’t, but I have just to see if I could). Anyway, different strokes for different folks I guess, but both models to me look like solutions in search of a problem😳. YMMV
392 = Bling and excess cash. I'm with you on the XE. Just to much going on between the makem go pedal and the wheels.
 

Yogi

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Yes we need something to replace fossil fuels, the answer just isn't here yet.
I'll beg to differ a little bit on that statement.
You are absolutely correct that we need to replace fossil fuels. Where I differ is that we do actually have the answer in electricity, but there are three fundamental problems with electricity;
1) How do we create it without raping and pillaging some other part of the environment?
2) How do we move it in much larger quantities than we move it today?
3) And, how do we store it once we get it to where we need it?

Once those questions are answered, we're good to go. Maybe there really is an Arc Reactor out there somewhere :)
 

COJLGirl

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If the 4xe was available in Punk'n Orange I would have been talking to dealers about trading my V6 JLUR on on.
That’s awesome! I struggled with selling my Punk’n JLUR because I love that color so much, but I ultimately sold it to Vroom and ordered a new 4xe. It’s perfect for me because I work from home and most of my trips are within a 2 to 7 mile radius. I’ll be pretty much all electric.
 

dgoodhue

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I would have ordered a 4Xe if I knew when the production timeline was going to be. In early February it was still unknown. I would bought it for more power. I have short commute as well. Everyone assumes that Prius owners are all the same. My friend uses a Prius for his work vehicle, he drives 35-40K miles a year. He has a collection of muscle cars, he focus isn't green or the environment, it is on cost savings.

My ex-wife wanted a Prius to save the planet. She hated the way the Prius drove and bought VW TDI. It was was kind of funny right after our divorce to see her driving a TDI, because the DPF cracked so she driving around sooty rear bumper and muffler while she was waiting for the VW TDI buyback...
 

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I'll beg to differ a little bit on that statement.
You are absolutely correct that we need to replace fossil fuels. Where I differ is that we do actually have the answer in electricity, but there are three fundamental problems with electricity;
1) How do we create it without raping and pillaging some other part of the environment?
2) How do we move it in much larger quantities than we move it today?
3) And, how do we store it once we get it to where we need it?

Once those questions are answered, we're good to go. Maybe there really is an Arc Reactor out there somewhere :)
  1. Solar, wind, tidal, geothermal all exist right now and meet those guidelines. Implementation is a big part of this. Such as using BIPV (Building-integrated PhotoVoltaics) as building materials, wind can be set up anywhere there's sufficient, and predictable wind patterns, offshore farms could be a huge source of power. Tidal is predictable, and the basics of it are already in place. The scale needs to be built up. Geothermal generation and heat pumps for heating cooling and power generation exist and can be tapped in many locations.
  2. HVDC transmission for grid to grid, and long-distance is already a thing. It simplifies many of the issues surrounding AC transmission. Longer distance, ability to connect vastly different supplies together, removes the need to synchronize AC grids and ease of storage (for your third issue). The various hydro utilities need to invest in it, however.
  3. Storage options are coming on rapidly. These include various Li-Ion chemistries, stored compressed air, hydro pumped storage, flywheel storage, hydrogen storage, flow batteries, and solid-state storage.
 
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Yogi

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  1. solar, wind, tidal, geothermal all exist right now and meet those guidelines. Implementation is a big part of this. Such as using BIPV (Building-integrated PhotoVoltaics) as building materials, wind can be set up anywhere there's sufficient, and predictable wind patterns, offshore farms could be a huge source of power. Tidal is predictable, and the basics of already in place. The scale needs to be built up. Geothermal generation and heat pumps for heating cooling and power generation exist and can be tapped many locations.
  2. HVDC transmission for grid to grid, and long-distance is already a thing. It simplifies many of the issues surrounding AC transmission. Longer distance, ability to connect vastly different supplies together, removes the need to synchronize AC grids and ease of storage (for your third issue). The various hydro utilities need to invest in it, however.
  3. Storage options are coming on rapidly. These include various Li-Ion chemistries, stored compressed air, hydro pumped storage, flywheel storage, hydrogen storage, flow batteries, and solid-state storage.
Was under a bit of a time constraint earlier and you have highlighted all of the good stuff :)
One of the more fascinating solutions for storage is molten salt. Lithium based batteries are making huge technological leaps at an incredible pace. A brave new world for sure, and exciting :)
 
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