rkj__

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Neat, but I wouldn't do any significant plowing with anything less than a 3/4 ton pickup truck with heavy duty cooling and transmission.
That said, light duty vehicles can be great for "insignificant" plowing, IMO. By insignificant, I mean a single driveway.

I bought a light duty plow for my half ton last season. I enjoyed clearing my driveway (~300ft long), while sitting in the heated cab of my truck. The plow never left my driveway. I have no intentions of ever driving down the road with the plow attached.
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MaineBumpkin

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I've seen a few Jeeps with plows around here and I've been plowing for about 40 years years now. I've used 1/2 ton trucks, 3/4 ton trucks and a Tacoma to plow our private road and a couple of neighborhood drives. I've never had a serious problem with any of the vehicles as a result of plowing. That said, I quickly decided to steer clear of putting a plow on our Jeep because the push plates kill the approach angle (based on what I have seen for plow options).

I'd encourage checking out the Fisher HT. Fisher has been doing this for a LONG time and I've had very good luck with their plows.
 

Had-a-few-Jeeps

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I plowed with a ‘97 TJ for a few years and never had a issue. I set up the Jeep to handle the extra weight of the plow (6.5’ Sno-Way) by using Grand Cherokee V8 springs, and Timbren (?) overload bags. The Jeep sagged just a little with the plow on, and drove great the rest of the year. I found that if you used good common sense when plowing (push at 2”, keep your speed down in transport and angle the blade properly to prevent overheating, don’t use it as a bulldozer) and otherwise don’t use the Jeep and plow carelessly,you should be fine. I handled light commercial lots and driveways with zero issues. Just my two-cents.
 

That Guy

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I too am looking at plow options for a JL; I just moved to 7800 feet in Colorado and have a ~700' paved driveway that's a steady 10.5% grade and switchbacks up the hill to the road (I live on the side of a mountain outside Denver). We also have an accessory drive that goes to the septic tanks that may need plowed as well, it's a whopping 21% grade, I'd plow it from the top down.

Can anyone hear speak to mounting a plow on anything other than a stock JL with 33" tires and plastic bumpers? I'd like to get a Rubicon Xtreme Recon for rock crawling in the summers, and use it to plow (just my) drive in the winter, or possibly a used 2019 JL Ultimate that's been factory lifted with the Fox shocks and has 35" tires. Plow dealers are saying I can't mount a plow to a Wrangler that's been lifted (eg the 1.5" stock lift of the Recon) or on 35" tires, or one with steel bumpers, but modding the crap out of stock and making things work that aren't "supposed" to seems to be the Jeep owner way so I'm hoping someone here can point me in the right direction!

And FYI, I looked at ATV and small-tractor plow setups but for my elevation and driveway length/ grade, even the owners of the used ones I've been looking at have told me neither of these will likely work for my property. I'd really rather not get a farm tractor with a front loader or a heavy duty truck, they're not nearly as much fun as a Jeep and I have several friends who rock crawl in the summers and I'd love to join them. I'd also happily remove the plow mount in the summer and reattach in the winter. I'm wondering if getting a second set of wheels and putting 33" (or shorter) tires on them and putting them on in the winter could also make this work?

Thanks for any advice you can give.
 
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Robellion

Robellion

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Honestly with those grades and lengths I would definitely look into a small tractor with nice chains on the wheels. As I think you will probably be able to do it going downhill on a stock Jeep, it's just that one mistake you make that gets you stuck. I spoke to a guy who owns the West Kill brewery here in West Kill, NY (Catskills), and he uses a pretty big John Deer Tractor with enclosed cabin/heat to go up and down his mountain side with no problems- Go Tractor, it's also the cheapest way to go. Small to Mid size with a plow should run you less than 30 grand.
 

That Guy

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Thanks for the feedback; I'm really hoping to avoid a tractor for the following reasons:

1) it costs me $4k to resurface the drive and I just had it done, I don't want to chew it up with chains;

2) In Evergreen (roughly where I live) we don't get a lot of snow through most of the winter, surprisingly. We get a number of 3-9" storms, but the "big dumps" don't come until the spring, usually March through May, and we may have 3-4 of these a year on average that dump 12-18" in one storm. My drive is jet black and south facing, and with the amount of sun we get the sun really bakes the drive and helps clean and dry it off, as long as the rays can get down to the asphalt. And our valley has an inversion that keeps it about 5 deg F WARMER than Denver in the winter, so I'm hoping something less intense than a tractor could do the job;

3) I don't really have room to store: my car, my wife's car, my motorcycle, AND a full-size farm tractor in the garage. Plus my 4x4 sprinter camper van won't fit in the garage so sits in front of the 3rd bay where I park my motorcycle. I don't really have space to garage a tractor and easily get it in and out in the winter; I was planning on trading my car in for a Jeep (or I guess a heavy-duty truck if that's all I can make work) to solve the storage problem. A tractor doesn't do that for me. And because I actually live on the side of a mountain, while I have 10 acres, I don't have a way DOWN to the flatter areas on the property where I could build another garage and store a tractor because on one side of the house I have a steep-sloping boulder field, and on the other side is the leech field that I can't drive across.

4) A tractor at this point would be a $30-40k single-use item because of the limitations of the property. We do have about 5 acres of flat land below us that comes within 15 feet of the road, but I'd need to get an easement from one of my neighbors to actually put in a drive and access that section. At that point I could see the utility of a tractor; but at the moment, it would ONLY be useful to plow the drive.

So in the end, if I can't make this work with a Jeep, I'll suppose I'll have to go with a heavy-duty truck, but I'd definitely prefer a Jeep!

Thanks again!
 
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Robellion

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Humm- well in that case use a non-lifted stock Rubicon. Get the Meyer pro blade for it, lock up the axles and go to town! I suggest thinner winter tires with possible non-link chains as well. Those don't rip up the driveway I believe.
 

bkgray115

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I too am looking at plow options for a JL; I just moved to 7800 feet in Colorado and have a ~700' paved driveway that's a steady 10.5% grade and switchbacks up the hill to the road (I live on the side of a mountain outside Denver). We also have an accessory drive that goes to the septic tanks that may need plowed as well, it's a whopping 21% grade, I'd plow it from the top down.

Can anyone hear speak to mounting a plow on anything other than a stock JL with 33" tires and plastic bumpers? I'd like to get a Rubicon Xtreme Recon for rock crawling in the summers, and use it to plow (just my) drive in the winter, or possibly a used 2019 JL Ultimate that's been factory lifted with the Fox shocks and has 35" tires. Plow dealers are saying I can't mount a plow to a Wrangler that's been lifted (eg the 1.5" stock lift of the Recon) or on 35" tires, or one with steel bumpers, but modding the crap out of stock and making things work that aren't "supposed" to seems to be the Jeep owner way so I'm hoping someone here can point me in the right direction!

And FYI, I looked at ATV and small-tractor plow setups but for my elevation and driveway length/ grade, even the owners of the used ones I've been looking at have told me neither of these will likely work for my property. I'd really rather not get a farm tractor with a front loader or a heavy duty truck, they're not nearly as much fun as a Jeep and I have several friends who rock crawl in the summers and I'd love to join them. I'd also happily remove the plow mount in the summer and reattach in the winter. I'm wondering if getting a second set of wheels and putting 33" (or shorter) tires on them and putting them on in the winter could also make this work?

Thanks for any advice you can give.
It comes down to plow angle. The higher you lift the jeep the harder it is to have the plow sit low enough to keep it from flipping over right away. your best bet for a lifted jeep is get a plow that connects with a 2" hitch so you can lower the hitch to where it needs to be.
 

That Guy

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It comes down to plow angle. The higher you lift the jeep the harder it is to have the plow sit low enough to keep it from flipping over right away. your best bet for a lifted jeep is get a plow that connects with a 2" hitch so you can lower the hitch to where it needs to be.
I thought of that, the Wingman uses a 2" receiver hitch, as does the SnowSport HD. But I can't figure out how I'd get the receiver hitch lower--would I need to have a custom bracket fabricated by a welding shop? That's why I was checking here, to see if anyone had done this. Thanks!
 

four low

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I have a front hitch, 2" receiver, on my 2 door JL. It is frame mounted, tucked up high enough not to be a problem . I got it from E-Trailer, there were 2 choices, I got the one with the most ground clearance, "Hidden Hitch " brand I believe.
I wouldn't hesitate to do light plowing with my JL.
BUT, the best way to move snow is with a snow blower, no snow walls to deal with, you can send snow well away from your work area. Living in Central New York, I see plenty of snow, and have moved it for many years with a compact diesel 4x4 tractor, front bucket, rear blower, no cab , used to do 1,200 ' road, plus shop and house. Now just 500' driveway, shop and house. Not a big cost, and a small 4x4 tractor, under 28 hp , with front bucket is so handy to have for all sorts of chores. Pay attention to the PTO hp when matching to a blower , you get power loss through the drive train.
 

bkgray115

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I thought of that, the Wingman uses a 2" receiver hitch, as does the SnowSport HD. But I can't figure out how I'd get the receiver hitch lower--would I need to have a custom bracket fabricated by a welding shop? That's why I was checking here, to see if anyone had done this. Thanks!
If I was doing it for light duty use I would just a drop hitch with a extention adapter. It would be easier to just weld one up to where you need it.
 
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