Mopar 2 inch lift Reviews

DanW

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Sparty

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I am assuming everyone is disconnecting on the trail. If i didnt i wouldve already rolled lol. Yeah i am talking auto transmission with the sport gearing. I am tackling obstacles that are eating my stock skids, and i need to get rid of cross member and get a better skid asap. I am doing "hard" stuff but nothing extreme. Torque on the wheels has never ever been an issue at all. The gearing stuff is very overestimated by folk here on the internet. I am sure there is a 1% of people tackling obstacles well beyond my level and for them it is probably very important.

But I am doing stuff most people would consider way out of their comfort zone and regearing is not really worth it with the auto transmission. Lockers definitely are.

Ive wheeled my jeep at every stage from bone stock sport. It is funny as your level increases you are like wow this thing is so capable. Then you get stuck and realize you need bigger tires and better suspension. Then you get stuck and start feeling that traction sucks and you need a locker. Then you keep trying harder stuff and realize you need even more lift, real skids and bigger tires. Then you stop for a second and realize maybe it is time to chill out and stop pushing the jeep further lol. Better transfer case or gearing has never really been an issue for me. I am sure if i keep leveling up eventually it will. But i would seriously have to start pushing gnarly stuff and I am rethinking how far do i wanna go. I am already doing black diamond trails here in california, and some times picking harder lines on purpose. i think this is enough for me.
I built up from a Sport when I had my TJ. Agreed on most points.


However, when trying to crawl with a manual, regear and the 4:1 transfer case of a Rubicon is essential. Otherwise you're just lunging over obstacles all day
 

sourdough

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My apologies to the OP. I guess I derailed this tread in the first page. In a deleted post someone mentioned how his lifted sport could do anything a Rubicon could do. I posted piss'n into the wind and with the wind as an analogy of wheeling a Sport vs Rubicon. Some took it personal and it was off to the races posting about driver skill and all sorts off topic posts. I found it funny that a memeber posted a couple times berating me personally, calling me a Rubicon snob and didn't know what I was talking about. He quoted me but then extrapolated what I said into his own butt hurt narrative. I was disappointed that folks liked his posts when his rant had no truth. I deleted my posts because, why post reality and reason when ignorance and bull shit is favored. Thankfully, this tread has come back to reality. IMO, Non-Rubicon packaged Wranglers are not as off road capable as a Rubicon packaged Wrangler. That is all I inferred.

How have I come to this opinion. I have experienced the evolution of factory Jeep 4x4's. I grew up in the Sierra's and have owned 4WD's and wheeled for 50+ years in all states from the Rocky's west. Built Willy's, Jeeps and Toyota's into the equivalent of the Rubicon package long before FCA produced a Rubicon packaged Wrangler. One of my builds was featured in JP mag. Sept. '01 during E.J.S. It has always been true that Willys/Jeep/Toyota owners that wheel often, modify and seldom keep them stock. Because low gears, traction and ground clearance have always been the safest and most reliable fun way to enjoy non maintained trails wherever they are. A couple years ago I purchased a JLR knowing from experience it is the most capable 4x4 that I could buy new. When you wheel trails harder than 5, you will find out why a Rubicon packaged Wrangler is a very good option and still just a starting point for modifications.
BTW, to the poster that challenged me to wheel the Rubicon with him in May. I hope you like sloppy wet snow and cold...
frozen miner.jpeg

Snow lasts a long time in the Sierra's. Think snow wheeling and camping if it's a normal winter. BTDT, when I lived in Tahoe City for 7 years during the '70's. Now at 70 yrs. of age, I wheel and camp the high country late June thru early Oct.. I'll pass on the offer.
 
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jeepoch

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@sourdough,

I don't believe you derailed this thread. After all why would anyone want a lift in the first place. Your posts give experience and insight as to the reasoning behind why you would want to consider one in the first place.

Also, I was one of the posters to state that I take my Sport where typically only Rubicon's go. I didn't intend to detail this thread either by debating the really cool things (as you point out) that the Rubicon package offers. No debate, Rubicon's rock. Truthfully, I'm jealous. Really.

My point is that with a [Mopar] lift and a few other modifications, I've been able to at least play with the big boys. In any competition with a Rubicon, my Sport and I would like be embarrassed regularly. Regardless, I am at least in the game.

Would I be able to do that without a lift in a stock Sport, not a chance. But that was why I responded (in a polite way). Rubicon's are awesome but that doesn't mean you absolutely have to have one in order to play outside on difficult terrain. I can take my Sport nearly anywhere a Rubicon could. Not necessarily everywhere, but damn close.

The moral of the story is that yes no matter the trim, a Mopar (or any lift) is a great investment. It will make any stock Wrangler a way more capable off-road vehicle.

Jay
 

Yogi

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$1800 CDN? When was that? I just got a quote for $2800 CDN installed with alignment. And that's with a pretty good price on the lift.
Also. Do you have part number for the Mopar track bar? When I asked, they pointed me towards Rubicon Express or Rancho track bars.
April/May 2019.
Part # is 68394087AA ... It's a factory number and the "AA" denotes an upgraded/updated factory part. When I got mine there were two listed, the original and this upgraded/updated part. We went with the newest one as it was supposed to work with Mopar 2" lift. Apparently it's like 1/2" longer than the original.
That being said, if you are planning on going higher at a later date, I would suggest something like a Street Smarts/Yeti adjustable track bar right from the outset.
 

Dyolfknip74

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Part # is 68394087AA ... It's a factory number and the "AA" denotes an upgraded/updated factory part. When I got mine there were two listed, the original and this upgraded/updated part. We went with the newest one as it was supposed to work with Mopar 2" lift. Apparently it's like 1/2" longer than the original.
That being said, if you are planning on going higher at a later date, I would suggest something like a Street Smarts/Yeti adjustable track bar right from the outset.
Ya, now with a discount, lift alone is $2100 CDN and install $600ish.

I ended up getting Rancho front and rears.

As soon as they get here, she's going in.
 

Bullwinkle

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Alex,

I certainly respect your viewpoint. There are likely a boatload (pun intended) of Jeepers that drive a certain way no matter what trim level they are piloting. Can't deny that. However, you know as well as almost all Jeep enthusiasts that lockers are one of the most desired pieces of equipment for just about any real serious 4 wheel situation. At least one single non-slipping wheel on any axle will provide motive power. This is what makes Rubicons so much more desirable for off-road applications.

Open differentials on the other hand don't enjoy the same physics. Without lockers, any spinning wheel on that axle renders that entire axle useless. With open diffs power is routed (by design) to the wheel with the least resistance. In other words the one with the least amount of traction. This in the bigger picture provides the way cool ability to turn the axle without binding or generating tire hop. That's why you can't run lockers on hard, dry pavement. It would grind, shave off and make mincemeat out of your diff gears pretty quickly.

Try running your lockers on pavement and make a tight turn. You won't be doing that very often.

So the Jeepers who don't have lockers must be way more cognizant of TRACTION. If any wheel on both axles (at the same time) slip then all motive effort is lost. This means that BOTH wheels on at least one axle must have traction in order to maintain momentum. This is Jeep physics 101. No way around it. Clearly if you don't take this limitation into account and (like the Rubicon jocks) just hit the throttle, you'll very quickly lose inertia and come to an unwanted stop (with all four wheels still slipping just spinning faster).

So for the Sports pilots, if you don't lay off the accelerator and use the least amount of torque to maintain traction, then you are going to run into trouble pretty quickly. [That's not a threat, that's a promise.] A heavy foot always raises the probability for even more wheel slip. Sports must therefore always use just the minimum power to maintain traction (period).

Rubicon jockeys with the lockers generally find that applying more (not less) power gets them out of trouble in most circumstances. Typically at least one wheel finds traction and vehicle momentum can be maintained. Still this creates more stress and a higher potential to break things.

In summary, if your driving all Jeep trims in the exact same way, you are asking for trouble. Driving a Sport with too much throttle, will generally be problematic. While driving a Rubi gives you the possibility of applying more power it's not always the best technique. Regardless, most people certainly would enjoy the Rubicon experience just because it's fun to apply more (not less) power to get out of sticky situations. It requires a lot more situational awareness, concentration and discipline to lay off the throttle. Sports drivers excel with the difficult skill of having a 'feather' foot.

Lastly, one MAJOR advantage that JL's have over their predecessors is that they all employ something called Brake Lock Differential (BLD). This is enabled even on Rubicon's when it's lockers are not engaged. This is a software implemented feature that detects wheel slip on any wheel. When one wheel on any particular axle is spinning faster than it's opposite side, the brake on the faster spinning (slipping) wheel is automatically applied. Thus keeping some amount of power available on the opposite wheel. With lockers engaged, both wheels spin at the exact same rate so the BLD doesn't apply.

So I suppose the argument can be made that the JL can tolerate someone who drives the Sport much more like a Rubicon. But, it's always a good idea to use the least amount of torque to maintain traction independent of trim type.

So if you are going to drive every Jeep trim level the same, it's safest and most optimal to always drive it like a Sport.

[Edit]
In addition to the diffs there is also the matter of sway bar disconnects. Good luck with articulation on a stock sport.

Since this thread is more about lifting your rig, I'm also assuming that the entire suspension in general is being examined as a whole with the overall goal is achieving a much better off-road experience.

For me and my Sport, the Mopar lift, wheels, 35's and a sway bar disconnect were by far my best mods. My Jeep is a thing of joy both on and especially off-road. I may not have a Rubi, but I certainly know I can go anywhere they do. Although admittedly they can play in the insane rock crap all they want. Regardless, if you do get a lift (no matter the type), don't skimp on the rubber. TRACTION will always be your friend no matter the trim. Everything else is just a bonus.

Jay
Does the sport S have the sway bar disconnect? LOL, does the sport S have a sway bar at all? Sorry, My ignorance with my jeep and what it has and or needs is immeasurable...
 

DanW

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Does the sport S have the sway bar disconnect? LOL, does the sport S have a sway bar at all? Sorry, My ignorance with my jeep and what it has and or needs is immeasurable...
No and yes. But adding a manual sway bar disco is pretty easy.
 

cavguy

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April/May 2019.
Part # is 68394087AA ... It's a factory number and the "AA" denotes an upgraded/updated factory part. When I got mine there were two listed, the original and this upgraded/updated part. We went with the newest one as it was supposed to work with Mopar 2" lift. Apparently it's like 1/2" longer than the original.
That being said, if you are planning on going higher at a later date, I would suggest something like a Street Smarts/Yeti adjustable track bar right from the outset.
I have not seen evidence to suggest that the 68394087AA track bar is any longer than any other of the factory tracking bar's on the JL. In fact, the STAR publication only states that the 68394087AA track bar "features stiffer bushings at the pivot ends".
 

jeepoch

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Does the sport S have the sway bar disconnect? LOL, does the sport S have a sway bar at all? Sorry, My ignorance with my jeep and what it has and or needs is immeasurable...
Lyle,

No the Rubicon is the only Jeep model with Sway Bar disconnect functionality with a switch from the dash. For all the other trims, they are always mechanically connected unless you disconnect them manually. This requires wrenching them off.

Some Jeepers wrench them off when 4 wheeling and then back on when done. While on-road at highway speeds the sway bars need to be connected in order to help prevent roll. One word of caution, the sway bars should not be permanently disconnected for safety. While off-road at low speeds though, disconnected sway bars provide maximum articulation allowing the greatest possible contact of both front wheels to whatever terrain is encountered.

Fortunately, there are Sway Bar Quick Disconnect Link Kits available that allow Sports and Sahara's to disconnect them. But, they still need to be disconnected and reconnected manually.

I have the Teraflex Quick Disconnect kit and it works pretty well. The sway bars can be disconnected quickly and easily, but contrary to their sales brochure, I find that I still have to crawl under the vehicle to reconnect the driver's side link.

Jay
 

Bullwinkle

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Lyle,

No the Rubicon is the only Jeep model with Sway Bar disconnect functionality with a switch from the dash. For all the other trims, they are always mechanically connected unless you disconnect them manually. This requires wrenching them off.

Some Jeepers wrench them off when 4 wheeling and then back on when done. While on-road at highway speeds the sway bars need to be connected in order to help prevent roll. One word of caution, the sway bars should not be permanently disconnected for safety. While off-road at low speeds though, disconnected sway bars provide maximum articulation allowing the greatest possible contact of both front wheels to whatever terrain is encountered.

Fortunately, there are Sway Bar Quick Disconnect Link Kits available that allow Sports and Sahara's to disconnect them. But, they still need to be disconnected and reconnected manually.

I have the Teraflex Quick Disconnect kit and it works pretty well. The sway bars can be disconnected quickly and easily, but contrary to their sales brochure, I find that I still have to crawl under the vehicle to reconnect the driver's side link.

Jay
Thank you...I think someone mentioned needing to fabricate (nothing major, just necessary, from what i understood) a better method of holding the disconnected sway bar ends so they didn't rattle or catch on anything...I didn't quite follow how he did that? or how that part works? Thanks again
 

Bullwinkle

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Tell me you have a Rubicon without telling me you have a Rubicon. You’re better than us peasants with sports.

I guess the old CJ’s that have literally gone anywhere, YJ’s and TJ’s as well with their 30/35’s must have not gotten the memo either.

Where have you brought your Rubicon that a sport can’t go?
Can I put 35"s on 17 x 9 wheels? i have 285/70/17's now, that's just under 33 as you already know.
 

Dyolfknip74

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Thank you...I think someone mentioned needing to fabricate (nothing major, just necessary, from what i understood) a better method of holding the disconnected sway bar ends so they didn't rattle or catch on anything...I didn't quite follow how he did that? or how that part works? Thanks again
When I was using quick disconnects on my JK, I would just zip tie or velcro strap them out of the way.
 
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