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Mishimoto

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Hey everybody!

We're excited to be back on the forums to announce the pre-sale of our 2018+ Jeep Wrangler JL & 2020+ Gladiator 3.6L performance air intake! As always, we're happy to share our R&D process with you all. This intake shares a lot of the development process with our 2.0T intake, so if you haven't checked that out, take a look.

Our R&D post is below and you can find more details on the pre-sale on our website: Mishimoto 2018+ Jeep Wrangler JL 3.6L Performance Intake Pre-Sale

Thanks!
-Steve

As automotive technology advances and manufacturers try to squeeze more power out of every drop of fuel, forced induction (specifically turbocharging) is becoming increasingly prevalent. But, while forced induction can make a 4-cylinder as powerful as an engine twice its size, nothing compares to a naturally-aspirated engine’s linear powerband. Natural aspiration is power in its purest form – a one-to-one connection of right foot and forward motion.

For many Jeep enthusiasts, the simplicity of natural aspiration has kept them loyal to the 3.6L Pentastar V6 in their 2018+ Wrangler JL or 2020+ Gladiator. That simplicity also makes modifying an N/A engine straightforward. Unlike modern turbocharged systems that usually require a tune to gain power from bolt-on modifications, N/A powerplants benefit tremendously from anything that improves airflow to or from the engine. One of those simple modifications that many enthusiasts install is an intake. While intakes on turbocharged engines usually just increase turbo sounds, a well-tuned intake on a naturally-aspirated engine can make significant power.

...Continue Reading>>>



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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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Hey everybody,

Just wanted to let you know that the pre-sale for this is still going and share this quick behind the scenes look at our testing!


Thanks!
-Steve
 

Fire Burns

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CARB compliant? I live in Caliunicornia.
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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CARB compliant? I live in Caliunicornia.
This intake is CARB approved! The EO number for this intake is #759-9 and your order should ship with a sticker.

Thanks!
-Steve
 

Fire Burns

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This intake is CARB approved! The EO number for this intake is #759-9 and your order should ship with a sticker.

Thanks!
-Steve
Hey guys, getting a CARB EO number is no small feat for a relatively small company like @Mishimoto. This means they've really done their homework and invested a bunch or time (and money) to get through the CARB red tape! Bravo!
 
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redracer

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What are the filtration specs of the dry filter? My 1st concern of any intake is the quality of filtration and protection of my engine.
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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Hey guys, getting a CARB EO number is no small feat for a relatively small company like @Mishimoto. This means they've really done their homework and invested a bunch or time (and money) to get through the CARD red tape! Bravo!
Thanks! CARB testing is a long and somewhat-annoying process, but we're really happy we got it for this intake :)

Is the filter proprietary, or is there an off the shelf replacement?
This is a custom-spec'd filter and is built to seal the airbox, but we do offer both the dry and oiled filters for sale separately.

What are the filtration specs of the dry filter? My 1st concern of any intake is the quality of filtration and protection of my engine.
I've asked our engineer for the exact efficiency percentage, but our filter removes particles down to 5 microns. Both our oiled and dry filters use multiple layers of woven cotton fabric that is more durable and filters better than the cotton gauze found in most performance filters. Our filters also use a stainless steel mesh (as opposed to soft aluminum mesh in other filters) and more rigid casings that prevent gaps in the filter material and around the edges of the filter. The oiled version also uses an electrostatically-charged oil that attracts and holds small particles that may otherwise pass through the filter material. This filter material is used on many 24 Hours of LeMans cars. While it's not a dusty trail, that race puts a huge amount of strain on tight-tolerance engines and any little failure can be disastrous.

Thanks!
-Steve
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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What are the filtration specs of the dry filter? My 1st concern of any intake is the quality of filtration and protection of my engine.
@redracer Just wanted to follow up with you on this - our filters are rated at an efficiency of 99.6% at 653 CFM using ISO coarse dust.

Thanks!
-Steve
 

rubileon

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@redracer Just wanted to follow up with you on this - our filters are rated at an efficiency of 99.6% at 653 CFM using ISO coarse dust.

Thanks!
-Steve
Steve, how many CFMs is the stock filter? And have you measured the filter in the Mopar cold air intake?

Thanks
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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Steve, how many CFMs is the stock filter? And have you measured the filter in the Mopar cold air intake?

Thanks
Hi @rubileon,

The stock filter does not have a CFM rating that we're aware of, and we have not tested the MOPAR intake. When we (and OEM manufacturers) test filters, we do so by measuring the pressure drop they create at various CFM. Most filters can flow enough air volume to function on even very high-performance vehicles, but the differentiating factor is how much work the engine has to do to pull that air in. This is measured as pressure drop and, because the work the engine does is fixed by it's volumetric efficiency, it is an effective means of measuring how well an intake will perform on an engine.

We also do not usually test just the filter alone, but rather we test the entire system as a whole. The fitler is often a major restriction on stock intakes, but just testing the filter doesn't tell us much, as even a high-flowing filter can be negated by something like a poorly designed airbox.

Feel free to let me know if you have any other questions!
-Steve
 

rubileon

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Hi @rubileon,

The stock filter does not have a CFM rating that we're aware of, and we have not tested the MOPAR intake. When we (and OEM manufacturers) test filters, we do so by measuring the pressure drop they create at various CFM. Most filters can flow enough air volume to function on even very high-performance vehicles, but the differentiating factor is how much work the engine has to do to pull that air in. This is measured as pressure drop and, because the work the engine does is fixed by it's volumetric efficiency, it is an effective means of measuring how well an intake will perform on an engine.

We also do not usually test just the filter alone, but rather we test the entire system as a whole. The fitler is often a major restriction on stock intakes, but just testing the filter doesn't tell us much, as even a high-flowing filter can be negated by something like a poorly designed airbox.

Feel free to let me know if you have any other questions!
-Steve
Thanks for that very informative reply.

In regards to the airbox, since the Pentastar uses temperature and MAP sensors and not a MAF sensor, I know there are no error caused by intakes with no resonators but does a lack of resonators affect performance or are they just there just to reduce induction noise?
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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Thanks for that very informative reply.

In regards to the airbox, since the Pentastar uses temperature and MAP sensors and not a MAF sensor, I know there are no error caused by intakes with no resonators but does a lack of resonators affect performance or are they just there just to reduce induction noise?
No problem! In the case of both the Pentastar and the Hurricane engines, the resonators on the intake affect performance. The purpose of the resonators is to effectively bounce air back into the cylinders to increase volumetric efficiency. We go into detail about how resonators and plenum tuning work in this post: https://www.mishimoto.com/engineering/2019/10/jeep-wrangler-intake-2018-rd-pt8/

Basically, when the intake valve closes, the momentum of the incoming air creates a slug of compressed air behind the valve. As pressure in the intake plenum drops, that slug of compressed air moves back towards the plenum. The job of the resonator is to help bounce the air back towards the valve at a speed which coincides with the next time the intake valve opens, forcing the compressed air into the cylinder along with the volume of air the piston draws in naturally, effectively boosting the volumetric efficiency of the engine.

The volume of the resonator and the size of the opening into the main intake tube determine the speed at which the compressed air returns to the cylinders and therefore determines where in the RPM range peak volumetric efficiency is reached. Engineering Explained also made a great video about intake tuning a few years ago that explains this concept:
Hope that answers your question! :)

-Steve
 

rubileon

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No problem! In the case of both the Pentastar and the Hurricane engines, the resonators on the intake affect performance. The purpose of the resonators is to effectively bounce air back into the cylinders to increase volumetric efficiency. We go into detail about how resonators and plenum tuning work in this post: https://www.mishimoto.com/engineering/2019/10/jeep-wrangler-intake-2018-rd-pt8/

Basically, when the intake valve closes, the momentum of the incoming air creates a slug of compressed air behind the valve. As pressure in the intake plenum drops, that slug of compressed air moves back towards the plenum. The job of the resonator is to help bounce the air back towards the valve at a speed which coincides with the next time the intake valve opens, forcing the compressed air into the cylinder along with the volume of air the piston draws in naturally, effectively boosting the volumetric efficiency of the engine.

The volume of the resonator and the size of the opening into the main intake tube determine the speed at which the compressed air returns to the cylinders and therefore determines where in the RPM range peak volumetric efficiency is reached. Engineering Explained also made a great video about intake tuning a few years ago that explains this concept:

Hope that answers your question! :)

-Steve
Thanks again, Steve. Makes sense.

One more, if you don't mind... what's the purpose of the JL's ambient air duct? Is it to create a mild ram effect to reduce pumping losses or is it to cool down the airbox with ambient air? What do they measure when optimising it? I imagine it quite difficult to simulate, being behind the complex grille, radiator, etc. around there?
 
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Mishimoto

Mishimoto

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Thanks again, Steve. Makes sense.

One more, if you don't mind... what's the purpose of the JL's ambient air duct? Is it to create a mild ram effect to reduce pumping losses or is it to cool down the airbox with ambient air? What do they measure when optimising it? I imagine it quite difficult to simulate, being behind the complex grille, radiator, etc. around there?
I don't mind at all :like: In most cases, the ambient air ducting is just to reduce intake air temps. In the case of the JL, the ambient air duct pulls air from the fender (behind the liner), so there's no positive pressure from the vehicle moving forward. Even for vehicles that do have a forward-facing duct, there are so many variables that I wouldn't think it would effectively increase VE except in very specific circumstances. Optimization is likely a combination of engineering budget and packaging considerations :giggle:

-Steve
 

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