KC HiLites - What products of theirs did you install?

Jeep Generation

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---> KC ADVENTURE FURTHER GIVEAWAY <---


Hey Everyone. If you didn't know, KC is doing an awesome contest right now for their customers. Part of their 50 year celebration. Video above and here is the link to submit...

---> CLICK HERE FOR KC ADVENTURE FURTHER GIVEAWAY <---

So besides from that, what KC products are you all running?
Post PICTURES and VIDEOS of your installs and adventures here as well!!!





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Jeep Generation

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Here is our '18 JLUR with a few KC Products. I'll leave videos of the installs below in the next few posts. Lets see your Jeeps with KC!!!
 
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Jeep Generation

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Jeep Generation

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Jeep Generation

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Jeep Generation

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Halstem1

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I have some questions... I was originally looking to do baja designs on my light upgrades. However, I really like the look of the pro6 on the A-pillars. That has me down a rabbit hole because I like everything to match. So first, I watched the video but didn't see a comparison of the before and after on the fog lights. As far as the volume of light, do you think they put off more? or just change to amber? I know that is probably hard to gauge since the color change but just curious your impressions. Second, I think you did the 40 degree wide beams on the A-pillar. How do you feel about that? I was going to do a driving or spot pattern. I thought the 40 degree would reflect too much off the hood. Thanks!
 

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Because of your video I ordered the fog light replacements from KC in clear this weekend. Even though I have already ordered I see both Rigid and Baja Designs also make replacements, do you have any impression of the difference between the three?
 
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I have some questions... I was originally looking to do baja designs on my light upgrades. However, I really like the look of the pro6 on the A-pillars. That has me down a rabbit hole because I like everything to match. So first, I watched the video but didn't see a comparison of the before and after on the fog lights. As far as the volume of light, do you think they put off more? or just change to amber? I know that is probably hard to gauge since the color change but just curious your impressions. Second, I think you did the 40 degree wide beams on the A-pillar. How do you feel about that? I was going to do a driving or spot pattern. I thought the 40 degree would reflect too much off the hood. Thanks!
Hi Mike, it is very easy to go down the Jeep rabbit hole. I do it all the time, lol. The stock halogen fog lights are not very good at all. They don't put out much light. I should have did a before shot, sorry about that. I have no experience with the stock LED fogs, so I cant say anything about that. The new KC Gravity G4 puts out a lot of light, way more than the stock halogen. It is a crisp clean light also. The Amber LED is amazing, cuts through the fog and rain so much better. Since it is their Gravity LED technology, it shoots the light back into the reflector. This captures more light and controls the light much better than just shooting a LED outward.

As far as the Pro6, I love the wide 40 on the A-Pillar. I have them angled to the side and down a bit, kinda like ditch lights. It gives me a lot of up close light on my sides. I don't get a glare on the hood, maybe because of the angle I have them at, or the hood decal. I have my Pro6 bar up top to give me light every else in front of me. I added the curve on the second to last on each side. Made a huge change on the light coverage. Between 2-3 and 6-7 of the 8 lights. Depends on your final set up plan on what light to run. If you run spot on your A-Pillar, you'll want to add some spots on your bumper also. Kinda like the Jeep in the Slim Lite video. Those are all spots beam patterns. I'll link some more info after this post for some reading on beam patterns and lights.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.
 
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@Halstem1 here is the video I was talking about with the Slim Lite Spot Beam Pattern on the A-Pillar and Bumper.
 
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@Halstem1 Here is some info for you on Beam Patterns.

WHAT’S THE BEST BEAM PATTERN AND WHAT ARE THEIR DIFFERENCES?
Picking a beam pattern is very subjective, and it often boils down to what your use will be. For that reason, the best beam pattern for you might be vastly different than the ideal beam pattern for someone else. In general, you are aiming for the most balanced, overall lighting configuration, which is a blend of some of these beam patterns. You wouldn’t want only spot pattern lights on your vehicle as you wouldn’t have great short range and peripheral illumination, conversely you also don’t want only fog beams because then you wouldn’t see objects you’re approaching that are farther away at longer distances. Here’s an explanation to some of the most common beam patterns and what their best uses are for.

Fog Beams: A true fog beam projects a beam pattern that is very wide horizontally (often 135 degrees or wider) but has a sharp vertical cut-off. Fog lights are intended to be mounted below the headlights(e.g. 10-24 inches above the ground) and are designed to shine below layers of fog, rain, snow, and even dust. This pattern lights up a pathway close to the ground but does not light the airborne particles in the line of sight while driving. These also only illuminate a short range distance from the vehicle and will not throw light very far. If you’re often driving in foggy, rainy, snowy, or dusty conditions, then fog beam light will greatly benefit your visibility.

FOGBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg


Wide-40 Beams:Lights that feature a Wide-40 beam are a hybrid between a fog beam and a driving beam light. They have a wide pattern, but also have increased brightness and light distance compared to a fog light pattern but do not have quite as much distance as a driving beam light. These are typically not street legal so they are a good option for you if you want something for off-road use only that has a very bright, and wide beam.

WIDEBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg


Driving Beams/Spread: Lights with a driving beam pattern are designed to supplement your high beam headlights and illuminate a path much further down the road. Driving Lights produce a rectangular shaped beam pattern that can reach further and wider than your headlights. Sometimes, depending on the manufacturer, a light with a driving beam pattern is not street legal and therefore cannot be used on roadways and when there is oncoming traffic. However, KC’s LED Driving lights all comply with both SAE and ECE regulations, while meeting street legal standards mandated by the Department of Transportation (DOT). Driving lights are very useful to create visibility near the sides of roadways and areas directly in front of the vehicle. They are great for all around trail riding as well. Spread beam lights are similar to driving beams but tend to be brighter, wider and sometimes taller as they are not required to follow specific SAE or ECE safety standards. Spread beam lights are great lights for multi-purpose off-road use and offer versatile, balanced lighting.

DRIVINGBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg
SPREADBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg


Spot Beams (Long Range): Spot or Long Range lights are able to penetrate deep into the night. Lights that have a spot beam pattern produce a tighter, more focused circular beam of light (often called a pencil beam) that reaches far down the road to see way out ahead toward the horizon even at higher speeds. Because this light pattern is very narrow, there is not much light on the sides. Spot beam lights are best when paired with other beam patterns to fill the areas closer to the vehicle, for a complete area of light beam coverage. Vital to the performance of these lights is where they are aimed.

SPOTBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg


Flood Beams: Flood beams are nearly the opposite of a spot beam and they create a wide, evenly distributed pattern of light that floods an area with an extremely tall vertical and wide horizontal light pattern. Due to the light being evenly distributed across a large area, they often are not very intense which proves beneficial in reducing glare when reflected off nearby objects around the vehicle.These lights are typically used as work lights, scene lights, and back-up lights to see a broader area at shorter distances. Construction and agricultural type vehicles often use these types of lights.

FLOODBEAM-PATTERS_BLOG.jpg






IS AN AMBER OR WHITE LIGHT BETTER?
In some conditions, and amber light will perform better but in other conditions a white light will perform better. This question really comes down to if you’re ever off-roading in the conditions where an amber light could prove beneficial. Generally speaking, an amber light will excel in dusty, foggy, rainy, or snowy conditions as they appear to cut through airborne particles much better than a more intense, white light does. However, a white light often appears much brighter even if they have the same power output.

Amber and white lights are different simply in their color temperature, which is how the perceived color of light is measured. Color temperature is most commonly measured in terms of degrees Kelvin (K). Lower values of around 2500-4000K appear more yellow/amber (warm) and higher values of 4000-7000K begin to appear white and even into the blue/violet range at the upper end (cool). Higher color temperatures have shorter wavelengths, which results in light bouncing off/reflecting off of particles in the air causing poorer visibility in dust, fog, rain, or snow.

For the most balanced lighting setup, a combination of amber lights and white lights is best — or at least having the option to turn your white light into an amber light with a clip-on transparent cover, etc.

KC_KELVIN-CHART_BLOG.jpg


amber_clear_direct_comparison_2-300x225.jpg
 
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Jeep Generation

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Because of your video I ordered the fog light replacements from KC in clear this weekend. Even though I have already ordered I see both Rigid and Baja Designs also make replacements, do you have any impression of the difference between the three?
Hi Scott, good to hear the video helped out. Here is my opinion of the 3 lights.

I would clear away from the Rigid. They aren't bad, just the quality of the light isn't the same quality as KC and Baja. They don't tend to last as long. I'm not sure what kind of warranty Ridid or Baja have, but KC offers a 23 year warranty. Their stuff is made to last, very solid. Now a big difference between the KC G4 Fogs and the Baja Fogs, is that KC uses their gravity LED technology. It reflects the LED back towards the reflectors where it captures and controls all of the light. When an LED is shot straight out, a lot of the light is lost and isn't controlled as well. Because of the Gravity LEDs, they have a smooth lens, so it doesn't restrict the light. Baja and Rigid both shoot the LED straight out and use the lens to make the beam pattern instead of the reflectors making the pattern. Instead of having a smooth lens for their fogs, they have patterns and lines in the lens. This doesn't control or capture the light as well. I'll link a video below from KC where they explain all of the components of off-road lights.

Now a side note, KC is the original off road lighting company. Been around since 1970. They not only make great quality products with newer technology deigns, they have amazing customer service. Then to top it all off, what really sets them apart in my opinion, is how involved they are with the community. They aren't just selling lights, they are part of the community. Example, the CEO is out in National Parts with his kids picking up trash and doing trail clean ups. Giving up his weekend to clean up our public lands from time to time. Not just him, but many of the KC people, they are all part of the community. They give back.

Hope this helps, let me know if you have any other questions.
 
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@Focker here is the video I was talking about. They explain the different parts of the light.
 

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