Jeep Wrangler 4xe will be name of PHEV Hybrid Electric model. Coming late 2020

Toycrusher

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You don't need a full-sized ICE. While obviously lighter and smaller, the Volt (1.5L 4) and the BMW i3 (0.65L 2-cylinder from a scooter) use small displacement engines to generate power for the electric motor. The 1.5L in the Volt gives it a total range of 420 miles (8.9 gallon fuel tank) and an MPGE of 106. So... no it's not double the cost for zero benefit. Especially since most of the time you're running on electric power only and using no gas at all.
Application is the issue. The Volt and i3 were passenger cars with little to no payload or work duty requirements. As such, either of those cars could be pushed down the road with a 60 hp 3-cylinder motor sufficiently. In the volt, at highway speed the electric motor actually turned off and a clutch connected the ICE directly to the wheels as that was more efficient then generating electricity. Plus, the Volt was sold at a pretty significant loss to GM.

In a truck or Jeep application, the load requirements are exponentially higher than a passenger car. Big tires, loaded down heavy, or towing, there are times we are at WOT asking for everything the little pentastar can supply. For instance, running 80mph down the highway requires double the horsepower and fuel as running at 50 mph. Just how big and heavy of a battery are you going to install to try to make up the difference? What happens when the battery runs out? Are you willing to drop your speed down to 50 instead of 80 until you get to your destination because that's all the horsepower your "range extender" makes?





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Toycrusher

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Some would say commuter/efficiency and short distance commercial are the majority or pretty darn close to the majority of vehicles on the road.
Which is exactly why a Tesla model 3 makes a great second vehicle. But you aren't going to save the planet buying 2nd vehicles...
 

AnnDee4444

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If you want one, go buy one. I’m not going to stop you nor do I care. I simply won’t purchase one based off of a friends experience, a friend whom I've known for 10 years. Results may vary. Go buy one.
I'm having way to much trouble following this conversation. It's all over the place.
 

JandS

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One factor not yet discussed is weight, specifically the fact that a plug in hybrid will be over 6000 GVWR. That will make it eligible for a Section 179 deduction which is a huge incentive for any business owner who will be able to write off the entire purchase price of the vehicle in year 1.

I have been waiting for the hybrid for exactly that reason - the tax benefit will likely be worth $15,000 - $20,000 to me, depending on the cost of the vehicle and our tax rate. That is before the plug in credit from the feds.

FWIW, the diesel qualifies as well.
 

KnG818

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One factor not yet discussed is weight, specifically the fact that a plug in hybrid will be over 6000 GVWR. That will make it eligible for a Section 179 deduction which is a huge incentive for any business owner who will be able to write off the entire purchase price of the vehicle in year 1.

I have been waiting for the hybrid for exactly that reason - the tax benefit will likely be worth $15,000 - $20,000 to me, depending on the cost of the vehicle and our tax rate. That is before the plug in credit from the feds.

FWIW, the diesel qualifies as well.
Blank the incentive...if I wanted an incentive I'd buy a Prius
 
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56nomad56

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Not a fair comparison....start with the weight differences of those vehicles to a JLUR.
That's why I stated "While obviously lighter and smaller...". I agree the Wrangler would need a larger ICE to charge the battery system. But nothing like a 3.0L V6 or Hemi.
 

56nomad56

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Application is the issue. The Volt and i3 were passenger cars with little to no payload or work duty requirements. As such, either of those cars could be pushed down the road with a 60 hp 3-cylinder motor sufficiently. In the volt, at highway speed the electric motor actually turned off and a clutch connected the ICE directly to the wheels as that was more efficient then generating electricity. Plus, the Volt was sold at a pretty significant loss to GM.

In a truck or Jeep application, the load requirements are exponentially higher than a passenger car. Big tires, loaded down heavy, or towing, there are times we are at WOT asking for everything the little pentastar can supply. For instance, running 80mph down the highway requires double the horsepower and fuel as running at 50 mph. Just how big and heavy of a battery are you going to install to try to make up the difference? What happens when the battery runs out? Are you willing to drop your speed down to 50 instead of 80 until you get to your destination because that's all the horsepower your "range extender" makes?
Your arguments make a lot of sense from a physics standpoint. Obviously (or maybe not) Jeep's engineers must have asked the same questions and faced the same issues, and come up with a solution that offers some benefit beyond what is already available; if not superior, why bother with the development costs? I'll wait to see the specs before I decide whether it's worth it to our particular family situation.
 

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