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Jeep Wrangler 4xe will be name of PHEV Hybrid Electric model. Coming late 2020

Night Ryder

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diesel_jeep found this on the Mopar website: https://www.mopar.com/en-us/my-vehicle/owners-manual.html
Looks like its getting the 2.0 turbo. Interestingly, if you select the Sahara PHEV on the drop down menu, it lists it as having 3.73 gears Also, it only lists Sahara and Rubicon as PHEV
wrangler-phev-png-png.png
 

Bren

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I think you guys are on to something here. I would like to see a full electric Wrangler with an on-board ICE to charge the batteries. Sort of like the diesel-electric locomotives. You could ditch the transmission completely, and possibly even the transfer case.
This is how the BMW i3 works. There's a 33hp scooter engine in the trunk. It has no connection to the drivetrain, it only charges the batteries.

The problem is it doesn't do it quite fast enough. The BMW i3 is VERY clever, and they made the thing super lightweight (relatively) by completing rethinking the design and manufacture from first principles. The passenger module is a carbon-fiber / plastic composite, the door panels are glued on, the interior panels are made from hemp, the tires are custom super narrow things that look like they belong on a motorcycle more than a car. The whole thing is weird (and awesome) in the name of weight savings. Meanwhile the car doesn't really do a great job of keeping up with demand if a) you're running the heater + b) at highway speed + c) experience a sustained incline. In moments like that, the buffer between what the batteries need to sustain output and what the motor is able to supply goes into a net negative, and the car has to go into a turtle mode (limiting to 45mph and reducing climate) so that the motor's "buffer" can catch up with energy demand.

I mention this because the Wrangler would not benefit from all of this engineering and would simply be heavy, and so clearly the generator would have to be bigger and at what point does that generator become something approximately equivalent to a 2.0T? That's the question I'd love for an engineer on here to answer.

Super interesting to think about though.
 

AnnDee4444

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This is how the BMW i3 works. There's a 33hp scooter engine in the trunk. It has no connection to the drivetrain, it only charges the batteries.
I've heard this before, but never really looked into it. Does it retain the CVT from the scooter to power the generator? I can't find any photos that show otherwise. If so, it seems like a terrible decision, as the CVT would loose around 25% of it's efficiency before any generating is actually done. Either way, I was thinking the range extender would be more for slower speed off-roading than freeway speeds.

After seeing how the ZF transmission incorporates the electric motor, I'm actually pretty impressed with their design. https://www.zf.com/products/en/lcv/products_50899.html
 

Toycrusher

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This is how the BMW i3 works. There's a 33hp scooter engine in the trunk. It has no connection to the drivetrain, it only charges the batteries.

The problem is it doesn't do it quite fast enough. The BMW i3 is VERY clever, and they made the thing super lightweight (relatively) by completing rethinking the design and manufacture from first principles. The passenger module is a carbon-fiber / plastic composite, the door panels are glued on, the interior panels are made from hemp, the tires are custom super narrow things that look like they belong on a motorcycle more than a car. The whole thing is weird (and awesome) in the name of weight savings. Meanwhile the car doesn't really do a great job of keeping up with demand if a) you're running the heater + b) at highway speed + c) experience a sustained incline. In moments like that, the buffer between what the batteries need to sustain output and what the motor is able to supply goes into a net negative, and the car has to go into a turtle mode (limiting to 45mph and reducing climate) so that the motor's "buffer" can catch up with energy demand.

I mention this because the Wrangler would not benefit from all of this engineering and would simply be heavy, and so clearly the generator would have to be bigger and at what point does that generator become something approximately equivalent to a 2.0T? That's the question I'd love for an engineer on here to answer.

Super interesting to think about though.
You are spot on. This is the exact reason why, although EV vehicles have been around for a century and a half, and ICE vehicles for nearly as long, nobody has made a successful business model out of combining the two in any application other than light duty personal transportation.
 

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Night Ryder

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You are spot on. This is the exact reason why, although EV vehicles have been around for a century and a half, and ICE vehicles for nearly as long, nobody has made a successful business model out of combining the two in any application other than light duty personal transportation.
Uh, locomotives?
 

Toycrusher

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Uh, locomotives?
Very different application. The diesel electric setup is used for traction management, not for efficiency. Direct mechanical drive would be more efficient IF they could manage traction losses.
 

Thinman

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I'm new to Jeeps but am actually a bit surprised at the relative indifference to the location of the charger port. Kinda kills two or three pretty popular mods until they are somehow reworked. (basic light bracket, over windshield light bracket, full rack).

When I first saw it I was kinda waiting for the uproar
 

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I'm new to Jeeps but am actually a bit surprised at the relative indifference to the location of the charger port. Kinda kills two or three pretty popular mods until they are somehow reworked. (basic light bracket, over windshield light bracket, full rack).

When I first saw it I was kinda waiting for the uproar
The problem with accessories that use the cowl is exactly this - only one accessory can use it. So you have to pick.
 

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I'm new to Jeeps but am actually a bit surprised at the relative indifference to the location of the charger port. Kinda kills two or three pretty popular mods until they are somehow reworked. (basic light bracket, over windshield light bracket, full rack).

When I first saw it I was kinda waiting for the uproar
I bet there will be kits to move the plug location and convert back to the standard cowl piece. Or companies will just make a different shaped PHEV specific bracket.

All these modifications take electricity or increase drag... which don't play nice with the PHEV anyway.
 

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Karl_in_Chicago

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Very different application. The diesel electric setup is used for traction management, not for efficiency. Direct mechanical drive would be more efficient IF they could manage traction losses.
Yes but it was you who said, direct quote (emphasis mine): "This is the exact reason why, although EV vehicles have been around for a century and a half, and ICE vehicles for nearly as long, nobody has made a successful business model out of combining the two in any application other than light duty personal transportation."

Can we agree that locomotives are not light duty transportation AND that cargo rail is (still) a successful business model? Hell you can't swing a dead cat around here without hitting a rail yard.
 

AnnDee4444

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I'd imagine PHEV drivers will do the interior light bar (that was thoroughly bashed on here) for this reason.
Why was it bashed? I though it looked like a pretty good design.
 

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Yes, but it would still function the same way, once the high capacity batter is mostly depleted the engine will still need to run in order to charge the battery. You still get the added torque the electric motor produces AND the torque of the ICE at the same time. Compare the acceleration of a Prius in EV mode only compared to when the ICE is also on, its a world of difference.
MOst all the major EV manufacturers produce vehicles that go 300+ miles on a single charge. Why does everyone think Jeep can't achieve something even close to these numbers? Geez, I would think they could build a Wrangler EV, even with its terrible aerodynamics, to get 150 miles out of a single charge it they tried. Oh course they would want to charge $95,000 for it before a single option.
 

AnnDee4444

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MOst all the major EV manufacturers produce vehicles that go 300+ miles on a single charge. Why does everyone think Jeep can't achieve something even close to these numbers? Geez, I would think they could build a Wrangler EV, even with its terrible aerodynamics, to get 150 miles out of a single charge it they tried. Oh course they would want to charge $95,000 for it before a single option.
Jeep Wrangler JL Jeep Wrangler 4xe will be name of PHEV Hybrid Electric model. Coming late 2020 1
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