Is the eTorque really a hybrid?

Is the eTorque really a hybrid?


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IdahoJOAT

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I was going over some of the showcases and noticed one called a hybrid Rubicon. A 2018 with the 2.0.

Is the eTorque system really considered a hybrid system?
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o||4xe||o

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I was going over some of the showcases and noticed one called a hybrid Rubicon. A 2018 with the 2.0.

Is the eTorque system really considered a hybrid system?
Word games: it's a "mild" hybrid. I know there are a lot of haters, but I really liked it on my Ram 1500 and would willingly buy it again.
 

jeepoch

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No, eTorque is not technically a hybrid. It is a misnomer to even be called a mild-hybrid.

Hybrids employ fully electric motor(s) that provide the primary tractive motive force. The ICE engine is used just to run a generator which then charges the vehicle's main battery. This allows the vehicle to operate without needing an external (plugged-in) recharge.

[Edit]
I'm not considering the older generations of vehicles such as the 1st gen Prius. My description is more of current and future implementations. I suppose you can argue any electric assist is a hybrid. I'm just outlining the Wrangler's adaptations. The 4xe is a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) with a 2.0L Turbo and not with one but two electric motors. The first is connected by a belt to the crankshaft and is 33kW. The second replaces the torque converter inside the transmission and is 100kW. Both of these can provide tractive motive force on their own allowing the 2.0L ICE to be disengaged. Thus making the 4xe a true hybrid. This is the pure basis of this thread.

The eTorque system uses a much (much) smaller electric motor, coupled to the Internal Combustion Engine's crankshaft. Therefore it does not provide the primary tractive motive force. It rather just assists the normal powertrain to build initial torque and momentum up to about 2-3 mph. After that, it drops out completely and contributes no further to any powertrain output energy. In fact it becomes a small amount of drag reducing the overall output power potential.

The primary reason behind eTorque is to eliminate the god-awful mini motorcycle sized AUX battery for the Engine Start Stop (ESS) system. The small bump push of the little motor is specifically used to restart motion when the engine has been turned off during idling events. Instead of 'eTorque' it should be called 'ASS' or yet Another Start Stop. But that is nowhere near as sexy for the marketing brochure. This propaganda deflects it's true purpose and make it look like something more useful than it really is.

The marketing genius that came up with 'eTorque' probably got a big-ASS bonus.

Jay
 
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JDub11

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Which hybrids only use the motor as a generator.
 

Killed by Death

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THe primary reason behind eTorque is to eliminate the god-awful mini motorcycle sized AUX battery for the Engine Start Stop (ESS) system.
Exactly why I ordered the 3.6 eTorque system. At least it's covered under the longer emissions warranty. That said, neither motor needs two batteries for ESS to function.

Not that I use it, but ESS works just fine on my other vehicles with one battery. My wife's BMW X3 went 4 1/2 years before crapping out.
 

Rescue119

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Exactly why I ordered the 3.6 eTorque system. At least it's covered under the longer emissions warranty. That said, neither motor needs two batteries for ESS to function.

Not that I use it, but ESS works just fine on my other vehicles with one battery. My wife's BMW X3 went 4 1/2 years before crapping out.
That and it's a lot smother transition. I don't even notice it compared the the ess
 

jeepoch

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Which hybrids only use the motor as a generator.
I'm no expert with the total list of true hybrid cars but I can say with confidence that almost all (if not every modern) diesel train locomotives are 100% hybrids. The diesel does nothing except turn the generator.

Hybrids are primarily electric motor vehicles. The industry refers to this technology as PHEV (Plug-in, Hybrid Electric Vehicle) emphasis on ELECTRIC VEHICLE. EV's implement either a large electric motor connected to the transmission or more commonly four smaller electric motors connected directly to each wheel. The latter configuration totally eliminates the transmission, drive-shaft, axles and differentials.

If the internal combustion engine (not an electric motor) connects directly to the transmission and powertrain, it is not a hybrid by industry definition. Hence the term 'mild' in reference to eTorque is only confusing consumers (hence this poll). It shouldn't really be called a 'hybrid' of any sort.

Jay
 

Jeff79

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That and it's a lot smother transition. I don't even notice it compared the the ess
If anyone is interested in the Technician training on etorque, here's a recording of a presentation...https://youtu.be/Hr1GkYYUR4s?t=92
 

Jeff79

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turbosix

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No, eTorque is not technically a hybrid. It is a misnomer to even be called a mild-hybrid.

Hybrids employ fully electric motor(s) that provide the primary tractive motive force. The ICE engine is used just to run a generator which then charges the vehicle's main battery. This allows the vehicle to operate without needing an external (plugged-in) recharge.


The eTorque system uses a much (much) smaller electric motor, connected directly to the Internal Combustion Engine's crankshaft. Therefore it does not provide the primary tractive motive force. It rather just assists the normal powertrain to build initial torque and momentum up to about 2-3 mph. After that, it drops out completely and contributes no further to any powertrain output energy. In fact it becomes a small amount of drag reducing the overall output power potential.

THe primary reason behind eTorque is to eliminate the god-awful mini motorcycle sized AUX battery for the Engine Start Stop (ESS) system. The small bump push of the little motor is specifically used to restart motion when the engine has been turned off during idling events. Instead of 'eTorque' it should be called 'ASS' or yet Another Start Stop. But that is nowhere near as sexy for the marketing brochure. This propaganda deflects it's true purpose and make it look like something more useful than it really is.

The marketing genius that came up with 'eTorque' probably got a big-ASS bonus.

Jay
You typed a lot of shit to be wrong in the first sentence of the second paragraph.
 

jaymz

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I'm no expert with the total list of true hybrid cars but I can say with confidence that almost all (if not every modern) diesel train locomotives are 100% hybrids. The diesel does nothing except turn the generator.

Hybrids are primarily electric motor vehicles. The industry refers to this technology as PHEV (Plug-in, Hybrid Electric Vehicle) emphasis on ELECTRIC VEHICLE. EV's implement either a large electric motor connected to the transmission or more commonly four smaller electric motors connected directly to each wheel. The latter configuration totally eliminates the transmission, drive-shaft, axles and differentials.

If the internal combustion engine (not an electric motor) connects directly to the transmission and powertrain, it is not a hybrid by industry definition. Hence the term 'mild' in reference to eTorque is only confusing consumers (hence this poll). It shouldn't really be called a 'hybrid' of any sort.

Jay
The Chevy Volt works like a diesel locomotive. Has a gas engine that is essentially a generator. It does nothing other than charge the batteries that run the electric motors. It’s I guess it’s actually a hybrid of an all electric and a hybrid.


A Prius (among others I’m sure) has both the ICE and the electric motor connected to a planetary gear set (transmission) and it is absolutely a hybrid by industry definition.
 

viper88

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No, eTorque is not technically a hybrid. It is a misnomer to even be called a mild-hybrid.

Hybrids employ fully electric motor(s) that provide the primary tractive motive force. The ICE engine is used just to run a generator which then charges the vehicle's main battery. This allows the vehicle to operate without needing an external (plugged-in) recharge.


The eTorque system uses a much (much) smaller electric motor, connected directly to the Internal Combustion Engine's crankshaft. Therefore it does not provide the primary tractive motive force. It rather just assists the normal powertrain to build initial torque and momentum up to about 2-3 mph. After that, it drops out completely and contributes no further to any powertrain output energy. In fact it becomes a small amount of drag reducing the overall output power potential.

THe primary reason behind eTorque is to eliminate the god-awful mini motorcycle sized AUX battery for the Engine Start Stop (ESS) system. The small bump push of the little motor is specifically used to restart motion when the engine has been turned off during idling events. Instead of 'eTorque' it should be called 'ASS' or yet Another Start Stop. But that is nowhere near as sexy for the marketing brochure. This propaganda deflects it's true purpose and make it look like something more useful than it really is.

The marketing genius that came up with 'eTorque' probably got a big-ASS bonus.

Jay
FCA should consider rescinding the bonus. No one really knows what it is or how it works. Not even the dealers. :LOL:
 

JDub11

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I'm aware of how a diesel locomotive works. We were talking about cars. I didn't realize the volt had a generator. I thought it was only electric. Are there any others?
 
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