Installing and rotating tires yourself

IronScott

Well-Known Member
First Name
Scott
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
1,178
Location
NW Arkansas
Vehicle(s)
2019 JLU Sahara, 1992 Jeep YJ, 2002 Chevy Silverado
I just bought/ordered a set of tires and wheels from Northridge online including TPMS and balancing. My JL Sahara is built but still in shipping stages, so I'm in preparation mode. I'm fully capable of removing wheels and putting them back on but is there anything I should be aware of or cautious of when swapping the stock wheels/tires for these aftermarkets? I did order a set of hubcentric rings and a new set of lug nuts, which supposedly should work with these wheels.

[edit] I know about tire size differences on speedometer/odometer. I have a Tazer in-hand already.
Advertisement

 

Andy2434

Well-Known Member
First Name
Andy
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
903
Reaction score
1,208
Location
Las Vegas/San Francisco
Vehicle(s)
'19 Billet JLUR, ‘20 Mustang GT/Prem/6MT/PP1
Occupation
Retired/Leisure
Do you have a torque wrench to properly torque the lug nuts? If so, you are good to go.
 

Rhinebeck01

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2018
Messages
8,297
Reaction score
10,636
Location
.
Vehicle(s)
2018 2dr. Rubi
@IronScott

Well, I will talk to you like I would talk to someone that had not done this deed before....

Well for the stock lugs, you will need a 19mm socket or you can use a 3/4" socket. You may need a breaker bar to crack the lugs loose as the factory really has them on there...

JL Manual says 130 ft/lb torque for wheel lug nuts and 59 ft/lb on the spare tire lugs. DO use a torque wrench when tightening a wheel. Do a Google search and learn how to torque properly.

Most guys that have commented here have not torqued to the 130 and have gone with 128 or so.

I myself carry a 15" breaker bar and a 19mm socket in the back of the JL just in case I ever need to change a flat. A breaker bar will get the job done when that cutsey tool that FCA supplies gives to little leverage.

A hint in regard to carrying the breaker bar. Get a 18" piece of foam pipe insulation from Home Depot and just lay the breaker bar in it. Now, you can take that breaker bar cradled in the foam and place it right in the little compartment in the back with the jack. The foam covering on the bar will prevent rattles..

With your new wheels, be real careful to be sure the lugs you bought work aok with them..... DON'T crank down on them until you see that they align with the wheel holes, etc.. You do not want to damage the wheel.

Remember, tightening the lugs in a cross pattern reduces the likelihood of things shifting and flexing, which means that your lugs will stay tight after you torque them. See the pic below...

Capture.PNG


View attachment 114997

View attachment 114998
 

Attachments

  • 0 bytes Views: 0
  • 0 bytes Views: 0
OP
OP
IronScott

IronScott

Well-Known Member
First Name
Scott
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
1,178
Location
NW Arkansas
Vehicle(s)
2019 JLU Sahara, 1992 Jeep YJ, 2002 Chevy Silverado
@IronScott

Well, I will talk to you like I would talk to someone that had not done this deed before....

Well for the stock lugs, you will need a 19mm socket or you can use a 3/4" socket. You may need a breaker bar to crack the lugs loose as the factory really has them on there...

JL Manual says 130 ft/lb torque for wheel lug nuts and 59 ft/lb on the spare tire lugs. DO use a torque wrench when tightening a wheel. Do a Google search and learn how to torque properly.

Most guys that have commented here have not torqued to the 130 and have gone with 128 or so.

I myself carry a 15" breaker bar and a 19mm socket in the back of the JL just in case I ever need to change a flat. A breaker bar will get the job done when that cutsey tool that FCA supplies gives to little leverage.

A hint in regard to carrying the breaker bar. Get a 18" piece of foam pipe insulation from Home Depot and just lay the breaker bar in it. Now, you can take that breaker bar cradled in the foam and place it right in the little compartment in the back with the jack. The foam covering on the bar will prevent rattles..

With your new wheels, be real careful to be sure the lugs you bought work aok with them..... DON'T crank down on them until you see that they align with the wheel holes, etc.. You do not want to damage the wheel.

Remember, tightening the lugs in a cross pattern reduces the likelihood of things shifting and flexing, which means that your lugs will stay tight after you torque them. See the pic below...
Thanks for the response. I'm aware already of most things you mentioned. Just trying to make sure I'm not missing something. I did not have a good breaker bar until recently when I needed it for my old Silverado. I wish I had bought it years ago. Would've saved a lot of headaches with stubborn bolts and lug nuts.

Good tip on the foam on the breaker bar. Thanks!

I've ordered hubcentric rings for the wheels and new lug nuts, since apparently the stock ones won't work. It was like pulling teeth to get information about the lug nuts. Amazing when you spend so much money with a company and need a very simple answer and can't get a straight response. I'm pissed about it but not going to disparage the company unless I can't get the aftermarket lugs to work.

Again, thanks for the response.
 

KDB

Well-Known Member
First Name
Kevin
Joined
Apr 10, 2018
Messages
436
Reaction score
695
Location
WI
Vehicle(s)
2018 2 Door JLR
Vehicle Showcase
2
That’s a new pattern I haven’t seen before. I routinely follow the 5 tire rotation protocol for rear wheel drive vehicles of:

Spare to RR
RR to RF
RF to LR
LR to LF
LF to spare
 

OldGuyNewJeep

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2017
Messages
3,211
Reaction score
5,293
Location
CT
Vehicle(s)
2018 Wrangler JL, 2016 Yukon XL
That’s a new pattern I haven’t seen before. I routinely follow the 5 tire rotation protocol for rear wheel drive vehicles of:

Spare to RR
RR to RF
RF to LR
LR to LF
LF to spare
From one of the other (many) threads on this topic (there is no right or wrong pattern, just be consistent):

upload_2018-11-29_20-47-30.jpeg
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
5,243
Reaction score
5,586
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
Rhinebeck1, great info on the breaker bar and the handy tip for storing, it is true that it's rare for most of us that haven't had 14mm lugs to realize how much force you'll need to break the lug nuts free w/ that wimpy wrench in the tool kit (not to mention having enough leverage to tighten them up adequately to get to a repair shop).

Also, be sure to get 4 jackstands for worry free rotations and many other repairs, not worth the chance of using two jackstands for one end and a hydraulic jack for the other. Chances for a hydraulic jack failing might be slim, but not worth a life threatening incident.
 

Covfefe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2017
Messages
1,058
Reaction score
1,171
Location
USA
Vehicle(s)
JLUSS
That’s a new pattern I haven’t seen before. I routinely follow the 5 tire rotation protocol for rear wheel drive vehicles of:

Spare to RR
RR to RF
RF to LR
LR to LF
LF to spare
It's easier to remember, because it's basically just a loop with a cross
 
OP
OP
IronScott

IronScott

Well-Known Member
First Name
Scott
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
1,178
Location
NW Arkansas
Vehicle(s)
2019 JLU Sahara, 1992 Jeep YJ, 2002 Chevy Silverado
Thanks, guys! Great help.
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
5,243
Reaction score
5,586
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
Another thing you might consider, just getting a cheap 1/2" drive Harbor Freight torque wrench w/ a small extension and socket. This comes in a plastic case, could easily be stored in the jeep and are pretty accurate for lug nut torque downs. Can be had w/ coupons for about $12 :)
 

cohocarl

Well-Known Member
First Name
Carl
Joined
Jun 4, 2018
Messages
176
Reaction score
222
Location
Mid-Michigan
Vehicle(s)
'21 Honda Passport, '18 Crosstrek, '16 Cherokee
I usually put either some black or painter's tape around the outside of the socket I'm using for the lug nuts which might save a paint chip. (especially if the lug nuts in the wheels are recessed a ways and there's little clearance.)

If I remember, the manual states 130lb/ft for the lug nut's...I only torqued my new wheels down to 100. Will check the tq in a week or so.
One thing I thought was odd. When I was cracking the stock lug nuts loose before I jacked it up (The lug nuts had never been off), I could loosen them with one finger on my 24" breaker bar. It took a little effort, but I could do it fairly easily on nearly all of them. They absolutely were not torqued down to 130lb/ft.
 

blnewt

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brad
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
5,243
Reaction score
5,586
Location
New Mexico
Vehicle(s)
2019 Jeep JL V6 SportS, (Retired 74 CJ-5, 80 CJ-7)
I usually put either some black or painter's tape around the outside of the socket I'm using for the lug nuts which might save a paint chip. (especially if the lug nuts in the wheels are recessed a ways and there's little clearance.)

If I remember, the manual states 130lb/ft for the lug nut's...I only torqued my new wheels down to 100. Will check the tq in a week or so.
One thing I thought was odd. When I was cracking the stock lug nuts loose before I jacked it up (The lug nuts had never been off), I could loosen them with one finger on my 24" breaker bar. It took a little effort, but I could do it fairly easily on nearly all of them. They absolutely were not torqued down to 130lb/ft.
Good tip about the painters tape on socket :handsinair:
Maybe the factory still has their impact guns set to JK lug nut torque???
 
Advertisement

Extreme Terrain
 
Advertisement
Top