Input Requested: Fox Shocks on Rubicon

Brock9281

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I’m looking to add a Rubicon Express economy kit to my Rubicon. Was told the 2” kit will add 2” to front and a little less in rear to level using shock spacers.
For extra was told I could have Fox Shocks 2.0 added.

Question is how different will the Fox Shocks make JLUR ride and drive? This is being added for 1) a little extra height 2) run 35s with proportionate wheel well look. I’m wanting to keep the ride/drive as pleasant as possible as this is my daily driver and will be taken on road trips to beach, etc.

Thanks!

 

Themistocles

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First shocks are most valuable when they are valved to pair with your springs/vehicle usage & weight. I would ask whether these are off-the shelf Fox 2.0s or if Rubicon Express has specifically had them valved to match their lift (which would mean OEM springs because the lift is just a spacer lift.) I suspect the answer here is they are just off the shelf units...which does decrease their value a bit. Now with that said Fox makes really great shocks (have four Fox 2.5" DSC shocks from Accutune sitting in the back of my Jeep about ready to be installed).

To me the answer has to come from what you want and how you think the Jeep works currently. You say you want to "keep" the ride as pleasant as possible. I take that to mean you like the stock ride and don't want to lose that comfortable ride as you add stuff. You also lay out a usage model for your vehicle that is pretty mild. In this case, I am not sure the benefit of a set of Fox shocks would be worth the cost (unless you have money to spend...in which case why not?) The kits comes with shock extensions so you can re-use your OEM shocks. This will keep you as close as possible to your OEM ride. If you like it, why throw money at a problem that doesn't exist?

My 2 cents...if you are looking for someplace to spend some money that will have the biggest bang for the buck in your suspension...find some adjustable length lower control arms and put those on instead of replacing your shocks. I would not replace OEM shocks unless one or more of the following were true.
1. I did not like the OEM ride and wanted to change it​
2. I was going to use the vehicle in a way that exceeded the capabilities of the OEM shock​
3. I was going to change the geometry of the suspension in such a way that the OEM shocks no longer fit the suspension​
 
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Brock9281

Brock9281

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First shocks are most valuable when they are valved to pair with your springs/vehicle usage & weight. I would ask whether these are off-the shelf Fox 2.0s or if Rubicon Express has specifically had them valved to match their lift (which would mean OEM springs because the lift is just a spacer lift.) I suspect the answer here is they are just off the shelf units...which does decrease their value a bit. Now with that said Fox makes really great shocks (have four Fox 2.5" DSC shocks from Accutune sitting in the back of my Jeep about ready to be installed).

To me the answer has to come from what you want and how you think the Jeep works currently. You say you want to "keep" the ride as pleasant as possible. I take that to mean you like the stock ride and don't want to lose that comfortable ride as you add stuff. You also lay out a usage model for your vehicle that is pretty mild. In this case, I am not sure the benefit of a set of Fox shocks would be worth the cost (unless you have money to spend...in which case why not?) The kits comes with shock extensions so you can re-use your OEM shocks. This will keep you as close as possible to your OEM ride. If you like it, why throw money at a problem that doesn't exist?

My 2 cents...if you are looking for someplace to spend some money that will have the biggest bang for the buck in your suspension...find some adjustable length lower control arms and put those on instead of replacing your shocks. I would not replace OEM shocks unless one or more of the following were true.
1. I did not like the OEM ride and wanted to change it​
2. I was going to use the vehicle in a way that exceeded the capabilities of the OEM shock​
3. I was going to change the geometry of the suspension in such a way that the OEM shocks no longer fit the suspension​
Great insight, much appreciated as this is my first Jeep!
I have a 2021 Rubicon 4 door. Not gonna lie and say this will be a “mall crawler” so the tires and stance is really for looks.
Drive now is good although I could stand for the steering to be a lighter tighter although I’m sure that expected with a Jeep.
For the Fox Shocks, would imagine they are off the shelf. Work being performed will be either at Southern Off-road Specialist or Fortec in the Roswell/Cumming area.
 

Themistocles

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When I first started club racing sport bikes I was told be our local track pro, when I asked a similar question about what I should do to my CBR, to forget the engine and focus on suspension. The engine was more powerful than I could use as is, and if I couldn't safely put the power to the ground and keep traction, then all more power would do would be to kill me faster. I listened to that advice, put on the best steering damper made and Ohlins shocks front and rear. I then upgraded brakes and tires. I then worked on rider geometry. After all that was done and I felt like there were times I was starting to ask something of the engine that it couldn't give, I started to work on HP. Then an old lady who could barely see over the wheel turned left in front of me going into a mall and destroyed my bike...but the story holds. Do the important stuff first, not the flashy stuff.

In the Wrangler everyone wants to go high and put on big tires...to me the first thing is steering. Wrangler steering sucks...make sure you have the aluminum steering box replaced. Put on something like the Steer Smarts sector shaft brace. Throw a good steering stabilizer on (the Fox ATS is great), maybe replace your track bar and tie rod. When you do raise it and put on bigger tires don't forget to correct your geometry, extend your brake lines, consider your driveshaft, etc.

So in short...instead of dumping money into the new shocks...spend it on your steering. Save shocks for another day...at least that is how I would do it knowing what I know now.
 
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LOBBS

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When I first started club racing sport bikes I was told be our local track pro, when I asked a similar question about what I should do to my CBR, to forget the engine and focus on suspension. The engine was more powerful than I could use as is, and if I couldn't safely put the power to the ground and keep traction, then all more power would do would be to kill me faster. I listened to that advice, put on the best steering damper made and Ohlins shocks front and rear. I then upgraded brakes and tires. I then worked on rider geometry. After all that was done and I felt like there were times I was starting to ask something of the engine that it couldn't give, I started to work on HP. Then an old lady who could barely see over the wheel turned left in front of me going into a mall and destroyed my bike...but the story holds. Do the important stuff first, not the flashy stuff.

In the Wrangler everyone wants to go high and put on big tires...to me the first thing is steering. Wrangler steering sucks...make sure you have the aluminum steering box replaced. Put on something like the Steer Smarts sector shaft brace. Throw a good steering stabilizer on (the Fox ATS is great), maybe replace your track bar. When you do raise it and put on bigger tires don't forget to correct your geometry, extend your brake lines, consider your driveshaft, etc.

So in short...instead of dumping money into the new shocks...spend it on your steering. Save shocks for another day...at least that is how I would do it knowing what I know now.
Along these same lines, I grew up with hot rods and muscle cars. Took an interest in 4x4s much later. Re-gear to the tire size you plan on running. Even 4.10s on the Rubicon are barely adequate for the stock 33s. People that slap bigger, heavier wheels and tires on and say they don't need to re-gear are lying to themselves because it isn't a flashy mod. It is expensive tho. But it's not seen as optional really anywhere but in the 4x4 world for some reason. I can't wait for my tires and rear gears to come off backorder so I can get them installed. Then I'll worry about adding more lift.
 

dpike

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fox 2.0s on my Clayton 2.5" lift are much more plush than the OE rubicon suspension.

 

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