Hybrid system derivation

  1. xray

    xray Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Ben
    Vehicle(s):
    2019 JLU Rubicon
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Posts:
    122
    Liked:
    49
    Check out this article:
    https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2017-chrysler-pacifica-hybrid-test-review

    I have been reading up on the Pacifica Hybrid system. So it retains a V-6 + a 16KW battery, good for 30 electric miles. Once the juice runs low, it reverts to about 28MPGs, which is not stellar.

    So this is where I am having misgivings about the entirety of this system heading to a Wrangler. It's crazy complex. Basically, like the Prius system but with all the baggage of trusting Chrysler to not screw this up. Toyota has been doing this for years, and has a solid reputation with engines and their hybrid system.

    Problem #2. There is no way to control which mode you're in. It could be electric, or gas, the system decides. The Prius plugin and the Mini both give you the option to go fully electric. Not sure if the Jeep will have the same lack of control, but it's all new ground to tread anyway.

    Problem #3. Price. A Rubicon is 45k well equipped; adding 8k in a complex system and battery seems like a crazy idea for bankrupting yourself on the initial purchase.

    I guess what I am thinking is that I'd get a fully electric Jeep 10 years out, but not risk it now. Need solid state batteries, and a fully electric bulletproof drivetrain.
     
    Chino78 likes this.
  2. macintux

    macintux Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    John
    Vehicle(s):
    2005 LJR
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts:
    824
    Liked:
    846
    Considering I’m lucky to get 14 in my LJ, 28 sounds pretty good. Were it possible to control when it’s all electric, I’d seriously consider it.

    But, I love my stick shift too much, so I’ll probably just take your approach to it. Wait.
     
  3. Blood Type J+

    Blood Type J+ Well-Known Member

    Vehicle(s):
    99 TJ Sport 6-cyl
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2018
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Posts:
    136
    Liked:
    182
    That's a completely different setup. The Wrangler has a mild-hybrid system that can boost torque at low rpms by running stored electricity through the starter/generator.

    There is no electric-only mode. The system is engineered to boost torque and supply current from the 48v subsystem to the 12v feed if needed but supposedly a failure or depleted battery in the 48v system will not impair the 12v system or gas-only operation.

    Reliability/squirrelliness? We'll see once they start escaping into the wild.

    More details here: https://www.jlwranglerforums.com/fo...hybrid-system-components-mgu-cables-ppu.2140/
     
  4. OP
    OP
    xray

    xray Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Ben
    Vehicle(s):
    2019 JLU Rubicon
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Posts:
    122
    Liked:
    49
    You're talking about the wrong system. This thread and this section is for the Plug-in hybrid not the mild-hybrid BSG or otherwise, but I see how you could get the systems confused.
     
    BearJewJonny and Blood Type J+ like this.
  5. manuka

    manuka Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Craig
    Vehicle(s):
    2018 Wrangler JLUR (on order), 2017 Chevy Volt
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2018
    Location:
    Michigan
    Posts:
    77
    Liked:
    102
    I am looking forward to the plug in Wrangler and to see how they decide to configure it. I am driving my second Volt today, and I am getting a JL (hopefully next week). If they do the Plug-In Wrangler correctly, I could replace both with a single Wrangler in 2020.

    I too would miss a stick shift in the Wrangler, but I would be willing to so for the proper setup.

    I feel the auto industry is missing a bit of an opportunity by offering Plug-In's as small sedans only. The Pacifica is a great first step for larger Plug-Ins, but it has a ways to go to. As a Volt driver for over 4 years, I feel Chrysler is dead wrong about drivers not wanting to think about maximum efficiency on a Plug-In. The Plug-In owners I have talked with bought it exactly for that reason. In order to compare the cost of gas with electric, and avoid the MPGe game, many look at cost per 100 miles. A vehicle that gets 20 MPG uses 5 Gal to go 100 miles. At a cost of $2.50/gal, that is $12.50/100 Miles, or $17.50/100 Miles if gas ever returns to $3.50. A typical EV can go 100 miles on less than $4.50 worth of electric. A bit more where electricity is higher than the national average. With a very efficient car the savings disappears unless gas costs more. So, my argument is that the biggest benefit is on the vehicles with the lower MPG, which is not where the auto industry started.

    My $0.02.....
     
    xjgary and FranklinFlyer like this.
  6. pedro6

    pedro6 New Member

    First Name:
    Nick
    Vehicle(s):
    XUV 3000
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA
    Posts:
    1
    Liked:
    0
    For the technical issues, with the help of CRM Software Development you can easily able to get all the derivations oriented the Hybrid system and the other system connections for the automobiles. And here, you can able to get and simplify all the assemble parts of it also.
     
Loading...

Share This Page